1.    18 Apr 2017 #1
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    Posts : 25,272
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro build 17046

    Introducing Power Throttling in Windows 10


    Most people running Windows like having multiple apps running at the same time – and often, what’s running in the background can drain your battery. In this latest Insider Preview build (Build 16176), we leveraged modern silicon capabilities to run background work in a power-efficient manner, thereby enhancing battery life significantly while still giving users access to powerful multitasking capabilities of Windows. With “Power Throttling”¯, when background work is running, Windows places the CPU in its most energy efficient operating modes – work gets done, but the minimal possible battery is spent on that work.

    You may remember some of our January power experiments we mentioned in Build 15002’s release notes. Power Throttling was one of those experiments, and showed up to 11% savings in CPU power consumption for some of the most strenuous use cases. We’ve been hard at work making improvements and listening to Windows Insider feedback since then, so this capability should help many of you see a nice boost in battery life!



    Figure 1 – Task Manager shows which processes are Power throttled

    Note: Power Throttling is currently available only for processors with Intel’s Speed Shift technology, available in Intel’s 6th-gen (and beyond) Core processors – we’re working on expanding support to other processors as well over the next few months.

    How does it work? To give great performance to the apps you’re using, while at the same time power throttling background work, we built a sophisticated detection system into Windows. The OS identifies work that is important to you (apps in the foreground, apps playing music, as well as other categories of important work we infer from the demands of running apps and the apps the user interacts with). While this detection works well for most apps, if you happen to notice an app that is negatively impacted by Power Throttling, we really want to know!! You can do 3 things:

    1. Provide feedback! Please run the Feedback Hub and file feedback under the Power and Battery > Throttled Applications category

    2. Control power throttling system-wide, using the Power Slider. Windows works hardest to keep the processor in its efficient ranges when you’ve selected “Battery Saver” or “Recommended”¯, and turns off completely when you’ve selected “Best Performance”¯.



    3. Opt individual apps out from Power Throttling:

    Manage Battery Usage by App in Windows 10 - Windows 10 Apps Features Tutorials

    • Go to Battery Settings (Settings > System > Battery).
    • Click on “Battery Usage by App”.¯
    • Select your app.
    • Toggle “Managed by Windows”¯ to “Off”.¯
    • Uncheck the “Reduce work app does when in background”¯ checkbox.

    Note that benchmark results may vary with power throttling turned on. While most benchmarks run fine and produce great performance results, some benchmark processes may be affected by throttling. Our general recommendation is to always run performance benchmarks while plugged in, as power throttling does not apply in that case.

    Developer note: Power throttling is designed to work well with applications out of the box, but we recognize that in some cases, application developers may be able to provide additional power savings by having more fine-grained control over Power Throttling. We will have APIs to provide more fine grained control in upcoming flights. Please make sure to watch out for API updates on MSDN.

    *Power throttling is a temporary working name for this capability and may change during the course of the development cycle for the next release of Windows.

    Thanks,

    Bill


    Source: Introducing Power Throttling - Windows Experience Blog


    See also:
    Last edited by Brink; 18 Apr 2017 at 20:18.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  2.    19 Apr 2017 #2
    Join Date : Jul 2014
    Serbia
    Posts : 10,451
    W10 Insider + Linux

    New processors have some of that built in but also have to be backed up by OS. Ryzen for instance has many temperature, voltage and power sensors that are supposed to give best performance for a task without letting it overload anything. It's supposed to keep heat and voltage at minimum. Part of it is adjustable from BIOS/EFI but OS has to take advantage of it.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  3.    19 Apr 2017 #3
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 229
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by CountMike View Post
    New processors have some of that built in but also have to be backed up by OS. Ryzen for instance has many temperature, voltage and power sensors that are supposed to give best performance for a task without letting it overload anything. It's supposed to keep heat and voltage at minimum. Part of it is adjustable from BIOS/EFI but OS has to take advantage of it.
    It's unlikely that desktops have a battery, which is where most ryzen's are likely to be found. I'm not sure if any laptop uses ryzen yet.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    20 Apr 2017 #4
    Join Date : Jul 2014
    Serbia
    Posts : 10,451
    W10 Insider + Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by vgchat View Post
    It's unlikely that desktops have a battery, which is where most ryzen's are likely to be found. I'm not sure if any laptop uses ryzen yet.
    It's not only battery that is of concern but overall efficiency of whole system, less power = less heat (processor as well as rest of the system). GPUs have that built in for a while now. Conventional core parking and other automatic power regulation is/was introducing some lags in performance due to coarseness of steps involved.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

 


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