1. Joined : Feb 2015
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 12,902
    Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64-bit 14393 Multiprocessor Free
       26 Jul 2016 #1

    Upgrade your Windows 10 VMs while they're still free


    Courtesy of a discussion with ZDNet's Wizard-of-the-Windows, Ed Bott, I have a few additional thoughts and tricks to share.

    He suggests that, for some VMs, you might want to claim your upgrade entitlement, but stay on a current version until you're ready to go full steam ahead. In that context, he suggests, "For VMs it is usually ludicrously easy to claim a free upgrade. Set a checkpoint first. Do the upgrade. Confirm you have activated and have a digital entitlement. Roll back to the previous checkpoint. Ta-da."

    What I did was simply clone my VMs before upgrading. That way I have a Windows 8.1 version with the same license as the Windows 10 version. While I have no real intention of using the older Windows version, I have a copy around in case I need it. Of course, I'll only use one or the other VM at any given time. That's one of the ways VMs are very helpful.

    One note: rather than snapshotting, I cloned the entire VM file. I like this approach better because then there's a pure, completely separate file. You don't have to worry about applying all sorts of delta changes to get back to the originating point.
    Virtually overlooked: Upgrade your Windows 10 VMs while they're still free | ZDNet
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  2. Joined : Dec 2015
    Posts : 2,430
    Windows10
       26 Jul 2016 #2

    When you say clone, do you mean a straight copy of VM (as opposed to some kind of cloning tool?

    I basically backup my vms just by copying the vm file directory using file explorer. I cannot (like you) see point of messing with rollback etc.

    With VMWare (not sure about others), if you backup copy a copy of windows 10 with a digital licence eg version 10586, then you decide to open up backup copy at some time, you must select "I moved it" rather than "I copied it", or else the virtual hardware id changes and the install deactivates.

    Of course, you are in potential EULA violation territory, using the "I moved it option", as you could theoretically run two vms from same licence. On my laptop, running two at same time is so slow as to make blatant EULA violation impractical anyway.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  3. Joined : Feb 2015
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 12,902
    Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64-bit 14393 Multiprocessor Free
       26 Jul 2016 #3

    cereberus said: View Post
    When you say clone, do you mean a straight copy of VM (as opposed to some kind of cloning tool?

    I basically backup my vms just by copying the vm file directory using file explorer. I cannot (like you) see point of messing with rollback etc.

    With VMWare (not sure about others), if you backup copy a copy of windows 10 with a digital licence eg version 10586, then you decide to open up backup copy at some time, you must select "I moved it" rather than "I copied it", or else the virtual hardware id changes and the install deactivates.

    Of course, you are in potential EULA violation territory, using the "I moved it option", as you could theoretically run two vms from same licence. On my laptop, running two at same time is so slow as to make blatant EULA violation impractical anyway.
    From the article, I'm guessing, by clone they mean an image copy of the VM, however your hypervisor does it, ie.. VMWare-> copying, Hyper-V -> exporting, and so on.
    The copy, is for, if you accidentally nuke your machine or have a harddrive failure and so on. I have my VM's on a 2nd internal SSD, but @Kari told me I should export a copy of the activated VM to a external disk for safe keeping(I use Hyper-V) according to @Brink's tutorial and Kari's video: Hyper-V Virtual Machine - Export in Windows 10 - Windows 10 Forums

    There are ways to go against EULA on a hardware machines too, so... just don't do it!

    This is primarily for non windows users, that need a VM to run specific software(Mac users, or Linux User, Free BSD and so on).
    Support for the older Windows versions, will eventually end as they reach end of life, and having a digital license for 10 on the VM, will be needed to keep using Windows safely, or if the 3rd party vendor, gives up support for older Windows versions.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  4. Joined : Oct 2013
    A Finnish ex-pat in Germany
    Posts : 9,528
    Windows 10 Pro
       26 Jul 2016 #4

    cereberus said: View Post
    I cannot (like you) see point of messing with rollback etc..
    The Checkpoint feature in Hyper-V is like a restore point on steroids which can be created and applied in seconds. There are multiple reasons to use them. It's clever virtualization, not "messing up" with anything.

    A good example. Two months after first Windows 10 Tech Preview was released, I decided to test if an in-place upgrade from Windows XP to 10 was possible, keeping installed software and files. I did this on Hyper-V virtual machine, installing XP and going from there.

    When XP and software were installed, I created a checkpoint and upgraded to Vista. Checking everything works I again created a checkpoint before upgrading to Windows 7, and so on. At the end my checkpoint list looked like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2014-12-01_03h18_18.png 
Views:	84 
Size:	12.7 KB 
ID:	92149


    (Screenshot from In-place upgrade - XP to 10 without losing the apps - Windows 10 Forums)

    When ready, I could go back to XP in seconds simply applying the checkpoint, then go to Windows 8.1, back to Vista and so on.

    The best part of checkpoints is they can be "forked", creating a new checkpoint subtree. Let's say I wanted to play with Vista a bit more, install loads of software just for fun of it , customize it. what ever. A new fork, subtree of checkpoints had been created from the base Vista checkpoint, allowing me to jump back to any other Windows version on my checkpoint list, then back to Vista > Installed Office checkpoint, from there jump to XP to play a game, back to Vista > Installed RailRoad Tycoon checkpoint, occasionally jump to Windows 10 to do build upgrade and new checkpoint, and so on.


    cereberus said: View Post
    With VMWare (not sure about others), if you backup copy a copy of windows 10 with a digital licence eg version 10586, then you decide to open up backup copy at some time, you must select "I moved it" rather than "I copied it", or else the virtual hardware id changes and the install deactivates.

    Of course, you are in potential EULA violation territory, using the "I moved it option", as you could theoretically run two vms from same licence. On my laptop, running two at same time is so slow as to make blatant EULA violation impractical anyway.
    Hyper-V can only register one instance of a vm with same GUID, that would not work in Hyper-V. I accept and understand that, using same GUID / activation on two machines is clear violation of EULA.

    If a vm with same GUID than an existing vm has will be imported, Hyper-V tells the machine cannot be registered because it already exists.


    Cliff S said: View Post
    ... I should export a copy of the activated VM to a external disk for safe keeping(I use Hyper-V) according to @Brink's tutorial and Kari's video: Hyper-V Virtual Machine - Export in Windows 10 - Windows 10 Forums
    Think exporting a Hyper-V vm as system backup. You might want to wipe your VM disk, reinstall Windows, whatever, an exported VM can always be imported back to Hyper-V keeping the GUID and activation.

    Kari
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  5. Joined : Dec 2015
    Posts : 2,430
    Windows10
       26 Jul 2016 #5

    Kari said: View Post
    The Checkpoint feature in Hyper-V is like a restore point on steroids which can be created and applied in seconds. There are multiple reasons to use them. It's clever virtualization, not "messing up" with anything.

    A good example. Two months after first Windows 10 Tech Preview was released, I decided to test if an in-place upgrade from Windows XP to 10 was possible, keeping installed software and files. I did this on Hyper-V virtual machine, installing XP and going from there.

    When XP and software were installed, I created a checkpoint and upgraded to Vista. Checking everything works I again created a checkpoint before upgrading to Windows 7, and so on. At the end my checkpoint list looked like this:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2014-12-01_03h18_18.png 
Views:	84 
Size:	12.7 KB 
ID:	92149


    (Screenshot from In-place upgrade - XP to 10 without losing the apps - Windows 10 Forums)

    When ready, I could go back to XP in seconds simply applying the checkpoint, then go to Windows 8.1, back to Vista and so on.

    The best part of checkpoints is they can be "forked", creating a new checkpoint subtree. Let's say I wanted to play with Vista a bit more, install loads of software just for fun of it , customize it. what ever. A new fork, subtree of checkpoints had been created from the base Vista checkpoint, allowing me to jump back to any other Windows version on my checkpoint list, then back to Vista > Installed Office checkpoint, from there jump to XP to play a game, back to Vista > Installed RailRoad Tycoon checkpoint, occasionally jump to Windows 10 to do build upgrade and new checkpoint, and so on.




    Hyper-V can only register one instance of a vm with same GUID, that would not work in Hyper-V. I accept and understand that, using same GUID / activation on two machines is clear violation of EULA.

    If a vm with same GUID than an existing vm has will be imported, Hyper-V tells the machine cannot be registered because it already exists.




    Think exporting a Hyper-V vm as system backup. You might want to wipe your VM disk, reinstall Windows, whatever, an exported VM can always be imported back to Hyper-V keeping the GUID and activation.

    Kari
    Thanks. I assume if I put an unactivated PRO on my pc, as an Insider build, it would never remain in existence long enough to actually expire would it?

    Not really a big deal to reinstall anyway as I only want to experiment with Hyper-V before I decide to buy a licence. I accept the vm os will also be unactivated.


    This does not violate any EULA terms does it?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  6. Joined : Feb 2015
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 12,902
    Microsoft Windows 10 Pro 64-bit 14393 Multiprocessor Free
       26 Jul 2016 #6
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  7. Joined : Oct 2013
    A Finnish ex-pat in Germany
    Posts : 9,528
    Windows 10 Pro
       26 Jul 2016 #7

    cereberus said: View Post
    Thanks. I assume if I put an unactivated PRO on my pc, as an Insider build, it would never remain in existence long enough to actually expire would it??
    See Cliff's post:
    I show how to use those free 90 day pre-installed Windows 10 VHDs in these two tutorials for 7 and 8 users as a way to test Windows 10 on real hardware before deciding if upgrade is OK:


    Notice that the process shown in Eight Forums tutorial is exactly the same you'd need to do in Windows 10 to use one of those VHDs on your system, as I tell in our video thread (see the yellow Tip box at the end of the post quote):

    Kari said: View Post

    cereberus said: View Post
    Not really a big deal to reinstall anyway as I only want to experiment with Hyper-V before I decide to buy a licence. I accept the vm os will also be unactivated.

    This does not violate any EULA terms does it?
    Even if you decided not to use the 90 day trial VHD and went with installing PRO without product key on dual boot, it would not be against EULA. You are allowed to install it and use to test before activating.

    If you decide to go native VHD boot route and have any questions or issues, post in this TF tutorial thread: Hyper-V - Native Boot VHD - Windows 10 Forums

    Kari
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


 


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