What is this drive E:?

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  1. Posts : 63
    Windows 10 pro en
       #11

    Another answer can be, a special software like something from Adobe uses hidden sectors for copyprotection. This kind of information is mostly stored in the free sectors after an MBR bootblock. But in this case it's unusual a drive letter was assigned.
    If it's not possible to remove E: , boot into safe mode and try again to remove it. After the E: is removed, check all your siftware to be sure all is working as expected.

    syntoh
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 41,455
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #12

    Please run:

    DiskParInfo.bat - Click here to go to the BSOD batch repository to download and run this batch file.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 7,128
    Windows 10 Pro Insider
       #13

    stanhilliard said:
    No.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Thanks. I will use Macrium. It will not be until tomorrow afternoon.
    The reason I asked is the fact that a card reader can show up as a drive,
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 63
    Windows 10 pro en
       #14

    Winuser said:
    The reason I asked is the fact that a card reader can show up as a drive,
    Then, Diskpart would show it as own Drive K.

    syntoh
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 7,128
    Windows 10 Pro Insider
       #15

    syntoh said:
    Then, Diskpart would show it as own Drive K.

    syntoh
    I just plugged in my USB card reader as a test. File Explorer is showing it as drive E: even though there is no media inserted in it.
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 180
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #16

    I found that I had a Macrium Reflect 7 that had installed 3 years ago. I updated it and it contains much more information about E:
    What is this drive E:?-macrium-reflectv7.3.5555.jpg

    If I interpret this right, Disk 1 is my SSD drive, Disk 2 is my external 2T drive containing partition E:. Disk 3 must be a second internal drive. I must have an E: drive to run an updated Access database that is hard wired to need E: (a known bug in Access) I don't want it to be on the external drive so I am wondering if it seems reasonable to rename the unformated E: to M: and then change Disk 3 partition 1 (G:) to E:?

    Edit: Then I would delete M:
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 41,455
    windows 10 professional version 1607 build 14393.969 64 bit
       #17

    When available please update the progress with post #12.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 920
    Windows 10 Pro
       #18

    What I would be wary of is that some applications can use unallocated, unformatted disk space to store settings, much like the Adobe authentication system and Intel's Optane caching through the RST + Optane drivers.
    However those applications do not tend to give the storage space they use a drive letter.
    Further more I find it highly unlikely that an external drive would be used for this purpose, is it possible the external drive has some form of hardware encryption built in that uses that partition? But again why the drive letter.
    When did you acquire the external drive, did you format it?
    The external drive, F:, is labelled "Backup", does it contain backup data? If so, how did you backup the data? Is the 1Mb partition something to do with your backup method?
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 23,172
    Win 10 Home ♦♦♦19045.4291 (x64) [22H2]
       #19

    stanhilliard said:
    I found that I had a Macrium Reflect 7 that had installed 3 years ago. I updated it and it contains much more information about E:
    What is this drive E:?-macrium-reflectv7.3.5555.jpg

    If I interpret this right, Disk 1 is my SSD drive, Disk 2 is my external 2T drive containing partition E:. Disk 3 must be a second internal drive. I must have an E: drive to run an updated Access database that is hard wired to need E: (a known bug in Access) I don't want it to be on the external drive so I am wondering if it seems reasonable to rename the unformated E: to M: and then change Disk 3 partition 1 (G:) to E:?

    Edit: Then I would delete M:


    I notice you have TWO optical drives. I would change their drive letters to P and Q, to get them out of the way. Then reboot the computer.

    You could also download and install EaseUS Partition Master (free), and it will SHOW and tell us what the E: drive actually is.

    Free partition manager software to resize partitions - EaseUS(R) Partition Master Free





    \Another thing to do would be to open Macrium Reflect and click this...

    What is this drive E:?-image1.png





    Clicking that will "automatically" check mark w/e partitions are necessary to boot Windows.
    Don't actually make a backup...just click the option shown in the RED box then post a screen shot of that.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 13,992
    Win10 Pro and Home, Win11 Pro and Home, Win7, Linux Mint
       #20

    Winuser said:
    I just plugged in my USB card reader as a test. File Explorer is showing it as drive E: even though there is no media inserted in it.
    I've seen the same with a pocketable USB SDHC card reader, also with a 2-bay SATA drive dock with no actual drive in it. I think the electronic interface in each that is what is being identified as a drive.
      My Computers


 

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