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  1.    29 Mar 2016 #1

    replacing laptop HDD with SSD after W10 upgrade


    replacing laptop HDD with SSD after W10 upgrade and activation

    If I clean install W10 to the new SSD, will Windows activate automatically.....

    thanks
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    29 Mar 2016 #2
    Join Date : Jul 2014
    San Jose, California
    Posts : 2,196
    Ubuntu14.04x64 MintMate17x64 Win10Prox64

    Yes. Replacing any device except the mother board will not affect activation.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    29 Mar 2016 #3

    Quote Originally Posted by topgundcp View Post
    Yes. Replacing any device except the mother board will not affect activation.
    Thanks, does MS store some sort of code based on the hardware matched to IP address ? just wondered how it works
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  4.    29 Mar 2016 #4

    Hi there

    I don't think even the CIA, Deuxieme Bureau, Russian security service or even the Mossad know how activation works these days -- although it seems to be based on some sort of Digital signature when you read the literature coming from Ms.

    I've re-installed the same W10 system (from new) on to a laptop in Iceland, Belgium and the UK and no problems with activation so it's not IP address based.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    29 Mar 2016 #5
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,551
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by reddwarf4ever View Post
    Thanks, does MS store some sort of code based on the hardware matched to IP address ? just wondered how it works
    When Windows boots, each time it creates a Hardware ID based upon a whole bunch of different factors/hardware serial numbers that go into a formula. The formula is weighted so that only a motherboard change is supposed to trigger a new Hardware ID. All the other factors are used to only make each computer's Hardware ID different from each others. When you first upgraded to Windows 10, the previous OS activation was used to activate Windows 10. When that happened, the Hardware ID and digital entitlement for Windows 10 was stored on Microsoft activation servers.

    After the initial upgrade, when Windows 10 starts (and probably periodically while running), Windows calculates the Hardware ID. As long as the Hardware ID remains unchanged and Windows 10 was previously activated, it stays activated.

    When you do a clean install of Windows 10, there is no previous activation to activate Windows 10 with. So it calculates the Hardware ID, sends that information to Microsoft activation servers which match it to the stored digital entitlement and that is returned to activate the Windows 10. Then upon each startup, Windows 10 calculates the same Hardware ID which matches the current activation on the computer and it stays activated without having to contact Microsoft activation servers.

    When you change the motherboard, Windows 10 starts up and it calculates a different Hardware ID. The change in Hardware ID triggers the deactivation of Windows 10. Then Windows 10 goes through the same routine - it sends the Hardware ID to Microsoft activation servers. If that Hardware ID was never provided to MS activation servers before with a Windows 10 activation, then the server returns that no match is found, and Windows 10 starts nagging you to provide a product key to activate it with.

    That's the basics of it. What actually gets sent to Microsoft activation servers is an Installation ID which is a combination of the Hardware ID, the Product ID (version of Windows 10), and the Product Key. So, actually changing any of those will trigger a deactivation and Windows 10 seeking activation again from Microsoft activation servers.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  6.    29 Mar 2016 #6

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    When Windows boots, each time it creates a Hardware ID based upon a whole bunch of different factors/hardware serial numbers that go into a formula. The formula is weighted so that only a motherboard change is supposed to trigger a new Hardware ID. All the other factors are used to only make each computer's Hardware ID different from each others. When you first upgraded to Windows 10, the previous OS activation was used to activate Windows 10. When that happened, the Hardware ID and digital entitlement for Windows 10 was stored on Microsoft activation servers.

    After the initial upgrade, when Windows 10 starts (and probably periodically while running), Windows calculates the Hardware ID. As long as the Hardware ID remains unchanged and Windows 10 was previously activated, it stays activated.

    When you do a clean install of Windows 10, there is no previous activation to activate Windows 10 with. So it calculates the Hardware ID, sends that information to Microsoft activation servers which match it to the stored digital entitlement and that is returned to activate the Windows 10. Then upon each startup, Windows 10 calculates the same Hardware ID which matches the current activation on the computer and it stays activated without having to contact Microsoft activation servers.

    When you change the motherboard, Windows 10 starts up and it calculates a different Hardware ID. The change in Hardware ID triggers the deactivation of Windows 10. Then Windows 10 goes through the same routine - it sends the Hardware ID to Microsoft activation servers. If that Hardware ID was never provided to MS activation servers before with a Windows 10 activation, then the server returns that no match is found, and Windows 10 starts nagging you to provide a product key to activate it with.

    That's the basics of it. What actually gets sent to Microsoft activation servers is an Installation ID which is a combination of the Hardware ID, the Product ID (version of Windows 10), and the Product Key. So, actually changing any of those will trigger a deactivation and Windows 10 seeking activation again from Microsoft activation servers.
    Amazing, what an explanation, thank you.....it's nice to be able to understands his finally
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  7.    31 Mar 2016 #7

    thought best to make an image of the laptop HDD before fitting the new ssd, then copy the image to it.....acronis reporting difficulty reading HDD.....so thought I would do a live upgrade using media creator.....sorted out some issues with my PC....is it possible to perform this with a CD created with the media tool.....I.e. an upgrade which is totally non destructive ?

    thanks
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    31 Mar 2016 #8
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,551
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by reddwarf4ever View Post
    ....is it possible to perform this with a CD created with the media tool.....I.e. an upgrade which is totally non destructive ?

    thanks
    With the old OS running, just insert the DVD like you would if you wanted to play a movie or copy data files. From within Windows, run setup.exe on the DVD.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    31 Mar 2016 #9

    will that be the same as a live upgrade ???
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  10.    31 Mar 2016 #10
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 9,551
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by reddwarf4ever View Post
    will that be the same as a live upgrade ???
    Yep.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
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