Windows 10: Windows 10 Update can't update system reserved partition Solved

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  1. Posts : 14
    Windows 8.1 64-bit
       15 Sep 2015 #1

    Windows 10 Update can't update system reserved partition


    Hi:

    I looked for this issue in the forum, but didn't see anything; sorry if it's here and I missed it.

    I'm trying to update from 8.1 64-bit to 10 on my i7 24GB Toshiba laptop. I keep getting the message "Windows 10 couldn't be installed. We couldn't update the system reserved partition."

    The very first try "failed" with an error Code C1900200. After that, every installation attempt shows "canceled" w/ an error Code 8024000B.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Note: "DISK 1" is my primary (boot) disk; "DISK 0" is my data disk. Both disks are 256Gb SSD drives. Other info is in my System Specs.

    I do not see a "reserved partition" on Disk 1; could this be the problem? I'd rather not do a clean install, in order to keep existing programs/settings etc., but will do so if necessary.

    Thanks,
    Don
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    15 Sep 2015 #2

    Install MiniTool Partition Wizard. Shrink your C: drive partition by 350mb and add that 350mb to the 100 mb System Partition.
    Best Free Partition Manager for Windows | MiniTool Partition Free
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 14
    Windows 8.1 64-bit
    Thread Starter
       15 Sep 2015 #3

    Update


    Following Bare Foot Boy's instructions on this Forum, I created a 450MB System Reserved partition on Disk 1 and re-booted.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    However, still same message and error Code 8024000B.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    15 Sep 2015 #4

    rittercon said: View Post
    Following Bare Foot Boy's instructions on this Forum, I created a 450MB System Reserved partition on Disk 1 and re-booted.

    However, still same message and error Code 8024000B.
    That's because the system reserved partition that you created isn't the active boot partition the computer is using to boot with. The initial 100mb system reserved partition is. Delete the new one you created, move the C:\ Drive partition over so it has 350mb free space in front of it, then add that 350mb to the initial 100mb system partition you already had.

    Solved Windows 10 couldn't update system reserved partition - Windows 10 Forums
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  5. Posts : 3,506
    Win_8.1-Pro, Win_10.1607-Pro, Mint_17.3
       15 Sep 2015 #5

    This looks like a GPT initialized disk and UEFI firmware.

    See Sample: Configure UEFI/GPT-Based Hard Drive Partitions by Using Windows PE and DiskPart for the default and recommended disk schema.

    Your setup doesn't seem to have a Microsoft Reserved partition (different from System Reserved) - it has it's own type of MSR. This is a hidden part, so it might only be visible in Diskpart.

    To cut down on any confusion, I would physically swap the drives so that
    Disk 1 becomes Disk 0 and
    Disk 0 becomes Disk 1.

    It's just a matter of of pulling the connectors and reconnecting them to the other port.
    After you have removed the bogus System REserve partition you created (as suggested by NavyLCDR) and swpped the drives,

    Please post a new Disk Management screen shot:

    Method One: Use Disk Management in the x-Menu (right click the Windows logo, select Disk Management)

    Select View > Bottom > Disk list

    Maximize the window and grab the screen shot.

    Method Two: Use a custom MMC to present Disk Management with pertinent information

    If you've already downloaded the custom MMC, go to Step 2 to launch it and then grab the screen shot.

    Step 1: Download this zip file (contains dmDskmgr-vd.mmc)


    Step 2: Double click dmDskmgr-vd.zip to open the compressed folder
    Double click dmDskmgr-vd.mmc to launch the custom Disk Management console
    You'll get an output similar to this:


    Press Alt+PrtScn to grab a snapshot of just the Disk Management window
    Open Paint and Ctrl+V to paste it, then save the image

    Attach the image to a new post.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    15 Sep 2015 #6

    If he swaps the drives, he will also have to change the boot order in bios.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 3,506
    Win_8.1-Pro, Win_10.1607-Pro, Mint_17.3
       15 Sep 2015 #7

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    If he swaps the drives, he will also have to change the boot order in bios.
    nah, a HD boot is a HD boot - it finds the first boot instruction, which should be on the EFI part (I think).

    I could be wrong ,,, I don't have a UEFI system.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    15 Sep 2015 #8

    Slartybart said: View Post
    nah, a HD boot is a HD boot - it finds the first boot instruction, which should be on the EFI part (I think).

    I could be wrong ,,, I don't have a UEFI system.
    UEFI or Legacy bios doesn't matter. When there is more than 1 hard drive installed, you have to tell bios which hard drive to go to boot from unless the bios automatically searches beginning with drive 0 and moving on if it doesn't find boot files there.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  9. Posts : 3,506
    Win_8.1-Pro, Win_10.1607-Pro, Mint_17.3
       15 Sep 2015 #9

    That's the way I understand bootstrapping - use the first boot code found then boot to the OS per the BCD store

    Or change the device boot order (HDD, Optical drive, or Flash drive) and look on that device for the boot code.

    Fair enough, let me restate: I don't have a UEFI system ... and I don't have a system with more than one drive at this time

    I'm basing this on MBR and active partitions (UEFI systems don't normally have the active flag set - some do, not sure why)
    See: Boot Sector

    Wiki: Unified Extensible Firmware Interface - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Booting
    UEFI booting
    .....
    Operating system loaders can be automatically detected by a UEFI implementation, which enables easy booting from removable devices such as USB flash drives. This automated detection relies on a standardized file path to the operating system loader, with the path depending on the computer architecture. The format of the file path is defined as <EFI_SYSTEM_PARTITION>/BOOT/BOOT<MACHINE_TYPE_SHORT_NAME>.EFI; for example, the file path to the loader on an x86-64 system is /efi/BOOT/BOOTX64.EFI.

    Booting UEFI systems from GPT-partitioned disks is commonly called UEFI-GPT booting. It is also common for a UEFI implementation to include a menu-based user interface to the boot manager, allowing the user to manually select the desired operating system (or system utility) from a list of available boot options.
    So, as I said ... I could be wrong, even with the citation.

    Rather than continue our discussion, I suggest that the drives be left alone in order to get on with trouble shooting the issue.

    The reason I posted was to note that I didn't see a System Reserved partition (referencing the error msg in post# 1) and suggest that it might be an MSR. Then I thought more and realized that Disk Management might not present the MSR. The disk swaps was a best guess that the Thread Starter has the disks in the wrong order.

    I enjoy a healthy discussion, but I think I'm only muddying the waters, so I'll bow out. I look in to see where this goes because I'm interested in threads with these types of issues.

    Bill
    .
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  10. Posts : 14
    Windows 8.1 64-bit
    Thread Starter
       15 Sep 2015 #10

    2nd update


    I used MiniTool Resize/Move function to create a 350MB partition in front of my c: drive (Disk 1). I must have done something wrong cause my laptop wouldn't boot, citing an NTFS error. I restored the disk w/ Acronis and am back to original windows 8.1 setup.

    If I use MiniTool "create" function, the newly created 350MB partition is on the "back" (not front) of Disk 1 and can't be added to the existing 100MB. I will take the time to read the MiniTool manual and let you know how it goes.

    The Disk 0 - Disk 1 mix-up has always bugged me just on principal, so I may go ahead and switch locations, even though it may not be an issue.

    Thanks for everyone's help; I appreciate it.
    Don
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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