Can't upgrade to Windows 11  

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  1. Posts : 61
    Windows 10 Pro version 1909 build 18363.1556
    Thread Starter
       #11

    Thanks! I will keep that in mind. Thank you, again!

    - - - Updated - - -

    - - - Updated - - -

    hsehestedt said:
    If you get to a point where you want to try Windows 11 on that system, look me up, I'd be happy to help.

    BTW, just a thought. If you have enough hard disk space, it's possible to install Windows 11 alongside your current Windows installation. You can install it to a Virtual HD. The nice thing about that is that you can fully test Win 11 to see how it works while keeping Win 10. If you decide to get rid of Win 11 it is literally about a one minute cleanup job. You simply delete the virtual HD and modify the boot entry to get rid of the Win 11 option. If you have any interest, let me know and I can shoot you links to all you need to know!
    Just to be clear, I should wait until I upgrade my CPU, then create a VHD, right? I did practice making a VHD on one of my drives, then deleted it until I install a new pcu. Thanks a lot!
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  2. Posts : 3,755
    Windows 11 Pro, 22H2
       #12

    Nothing says that you have to wait until you replace the CPU, but if you plan to do so fairly soon, waiting is just fine.
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  3. Posts : 1,600
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit v21H2
       #13

    The following screenshots are from last year when my desktop computer had an AMD Ryzen 7 1700X CPU which did not support Windows 11. I used Hyper-V to create a virtual machine for Windows 11. Note Hyper-V has options to emulate what is necessary to satisfy the Windows 11 requirements.

    Note for the 2nd screenshot the virtual machine on the left is Windows 11 and the one on the right is Windows-FX. Windows-FX under the hood is Linux but has its desktop look like Windows 11.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Can't upgrade to Windows 11-health-check.jpg   Can't upgrade to Windows 11-windows-11-hyper-v.jpg  
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  4. Posts : 3,755
    Windows 11 Pro, 22H2
       #14

    bimfi,

    You can install Windows 11 on unsupported with some simple procedures. Below are my personal notes on the topic. Forgive the rough nature of the notes, I wrote these just as reference for myself, so if anything is unclear, please ask!

    First, I need to give you the standard disclaimer: While installing Windows 11 on unsupported seems to work great for most people, there is always a chance that some future update could break something. I will note that that I, and many others, have had great success running Win 11 on unsupported hardware.

    Okay, about the notes that follow:

    This may seem long, but that is because it offers multiple different methods for accomplishing the task of installing Windows on unsupported hardware. You just need to pick the method that you wish to use.

    In addition, Win 11 now tries to force you into logging on with a Microsoft account during setup. I include methods for working around this as well.

    Again, any questions, please feel free to ask. You may also want to bounce over to Windows 11 Forum where there is lots of discussion on this topic.

    -----------------

    * Upgrade Installation *

    Method 1
    ========

    When installing Windows 11 as an upgrade, Windows will make use of the file \sources\appraiserres.dll to determine the system requirements for installation. To bypass the system requirements, you can replace that file.

    Simply delete or rename the file \sources\appraiserres.dll. Replace the file that you deleted or renamed with a fake appraiserres.dll. You could simply create a text file and rename it to appraiserres.dll. If you prefer, you could also just grab the appraiserres.dll from a Windows 10 distribution.

    You can now run setup without the Win 11 specific system requirements being imposed upon you.

    Method 2
    ========

    NOTE: If you follow the steps in method 1, you do not need to follow the steps outlined in method 2.

    You can bypass the TPM 2.0 and CPU requirements during an upgrade by making the following change to the registry:

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup]
    "AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU"=dword:00000001

    You make this into a .REG file if you wish. Then, simply double-click that file to merge the contents into the registry. If you want to do this, open notepad, paste in the following lines between the "----" lines (not including those lines), and save it to a file with a .REG extention:

    ----
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup]
    "AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU"=dword:00000001
    ----

    NOTE: This registry setting bypasses the need for a supported CPU and a TPM 2.0 but a TPM 1.2 would still be needed. If you still do not meet this requirement, then please follow the steps in method 1 instead.

    References
    ==========

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...b-2ce77ac7c70e


    * Clean Install *

    IMPORTANT: Be sure to read both PART 1 and PART 2 below. Part 1 describes how to bypass the initial Windows hardware requirements. Part 2 describes how to create a local user account and bypass the need to login with a Microsoft account later on in the installation.


    PART 1 - This section describes how to bypass the initial hardware requirements for Windows 11.
    Be certain to also read the PART 2 section below.

    How to Bypass Windows 11 Installation Requirements with a Clean Install

    Note: All methods below have the same goal, which is to set registry entries in Windows PE to bypass the Windows setup requirements. This will NOT affect the final installation of Windows. It only affects the registry entries of Windows PE which is loaded in memory during setup.


    Method 1 - Using an Autounattend.xml Answer File

    Note: The answer file provided here does nothing except to bypass the Windows 11 system requirements.

    If you want to create an answer file on your own, these are the steps to include the entries that bypass Windows 11 system requirements.

    Create a new answer file or modify an existing answer file with the following entries:

    Add the component Microsoft Windows Setup\RunSynchronos\RunSynchronousCommand to Pass 1 windowsPE.

    Set the following values:

    Order: 1
    Path: reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassTPMCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f

    Repeat the above steps 4 more time (for a total of 5 "RunSynchronousCommand" entries) with the following entries:

    Order: 2
    Path: reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassSecureBootCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f

    Order: 3
    Path: reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassRAMCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f

    Order: 4
    Path: reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassStorageCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f

    Order: 5
    Path: reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassCPUCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f


    Method 2 - Manually Modify the Registry for Windows Setup

    At the first static screen where Windows setup requests information from you during setup, press SHIFT + F10 to open a command prompt.

    Type regedit and hit ENTER. Add the following entries:

    HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig BypassTPMCheck reg_dword 0x00000001
    HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig BypassSecureBootCheck reg_dword 0x00000001
    HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig BypassRAMCheck reg_dword 0x00000001
    HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig BypassStorageCheck reg_dword 0x00000001
    HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig BypassCPUCheck reg_dword 0x00000001

    Close the Registry Editor and the command prompt. Continue installation normally.


    Method 3 - Using a .reg file

    Create a file with the extension .reg. Place the following text between the "----" sections in that file. Don't include the "----" lines.

    ----
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig]
    "BypassTPMCheck"=dword:00000001
    "BypassSecureBootCheck"=dword:00000001
    "BypassRAMCheck"=dword:00000001
    "BypassStorageCheck"=dword:00000001
    "BypassCPUCheck"=dword:00000001
    ----

    Save the file.

    Drop this registry file onto your install media. After starting setup, when you reach the first static screen where information is requested by setup, press Shift + F10 to open a command prompt. Navigate to the drive letter where the .reg file is located and then run it. You can run it by simply typing the name of the file and pressing <ENTER>. Close the command prompt and continue installation of Windows as usual.


    Method 4 - Using a Batch File

    Create a text file with the extension .bat. Place the following in that file:

    @echo off
    reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassTPMCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f > NUL
    reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassSecureBootCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f > NUL
    reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassRAMCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f > NUL
    reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassStorageCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f > NUL
    reg add HKLM\System\Setup\LabConfig /v BypassCPUCheck /t reg_dword /d 0x00000001 /f > NUL

    NOTE: The "> NUL" simply suppresses the output from being displayed for "silent" operation.

    Drop this file onto your install media. After starting setup, when you reach the first static screen where information is requested by setup, press Shift + F10 to open a command prompt. Navigate to the drive letter where the .bat file is located and then run it. You can run it by simply typing the name of the file and pressing <ENTER>. Close the command prompt and continue installation of Windows as usual.


    Part 2 - This section describes how to create a local account during installation and
    bypass the requirement to logon with a Microsoft account in Windows 11 Pro.

    If you have a network connection:

    When you reach the screen where you have a choice to "Set up for personal use" or "Set up for work or school", select "Set up for work or school" and click on "Next".

    On the next screen, select "Sign-in options", then "Domain join instead". Don't worry, we are not joining a domain!

    On the next screen, supply the local user name that you want to create and then continue through setup as normal.


    If you do NOT have an Internet connection:

    When you reach the screen where Windows wants to connect you to a network to create a local user account, press SHIFT + F10 to open a command prompt, and then run "OOBE\BypassNRO". The system will reboot. After rebooting, you will start back up at the screen asking you to select the correct keyboard layout. When you get back to the "Let's connect you to a network" screen, you will have an option to select "I don't have internet". Choose that option. On the next screen, select "Continue with limited setup". Enter your local user account name, and then continue with setup as usual.
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  5. Posts : 61
    Windows 10 Pro version 1909 build 18363.1556
    Thread Starter
       #15

    Purchased my upgrade CPU (Ryzen 5 5600X). Now I am waiting for some free time to install it.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 61
    Windows 10 Pro version 1909 build 18363.1556
    Thread Starter
       #16

    I need help!
    Today I swapped out my Ryzen 5 1600X cpu with the Ryzen 5 5600X cpu. Everything went smoothly, or so I thought. Cleaned the dust from the rig, replaced the cpu, removed the Video card and blew out the dust, removed and reseated the RAM, reinstalled the cpu heat sink that was on my previous build, then plugged power back in and powered it up. What I got was nothing other than power to the mobo. No POST, no display on my monitors. Thinking that I may have unseated something, I took the PC to the work desk and reseated everything that I could. When that did not work, I swapped cpu with original. The PC powered up, telling me that I had a new cpu installed and needed to go into setup. This was odd, because this was the original cpu and should not have been recognized as a new one. This led me to believe that the PC HAD recognized the new cpu but because I had no display monitor, I could not see this. So, I took the original cpu out, again, and put in the new cpu. I did not touch any other component other than the cpu and heat sink, then powered it back up. Again, nothing is happening. I have no monitor displays, and the PC does not go into POST or setup.

    I don't know where to begin my troubleshooting. I don't want to believe that the new cpu is bad. I am 99.9% sure that my mobo supports the newer cpu. Any help would be great. Thanks!
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  7. Posts : 3,755
    Windows 11 Pro, 22H2
       #17

    According to the ASUS Web Site, to support your new CPU, you must have BIOS version 6026 or newer.

    My suggestion: plug-in the original CPU and verify that you are at this BIOS level or newer; upgrade if you are not at this level.

    If you are already at the required BIOS level, try performing a CLEAR CMOS operation to see if that helps. This is usually accomplished with a jumper on the motherboard. See your user guide for details.
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 3,516
    several
       #18

      My Computer


  9. Posts : 61
    Windows 10 Pro version 1909 build 18363.1556
    Thread Starter
       #19

    thank you. I will do that right now
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 3,516
    several
       #20
      My Computer


 

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