embedded OEM key

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  1. Posts : 3,257
    Windows 10 Pro
       #11

    NavyLCDR said:
    No, it doesn't. Again, (and again, and again) the previous version Windows key has nothing to do with Windows 10.
    While it's true that it doesn't use the key from the BIOS/FW it does need to send the original key to MS's activation servers, so that when you transfer a copy to a new PC (assuming it's retail) it will continue to activate, even after the 1 year mark. Otherwise, there would be no way for servers to know that your older OS was eligible for upgrading after the free 1 year upgrade was up.

    The key is acquired from the activated copy of windows, not the BIOS/FW though.
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  2. Posts : 61,577
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
       #12

    Mystere said:
    But, by doing that, you're giving the impression that they should be used to install and activate. In other words, you're confusing people.



    It's best to not post anything that's just going to confuse matters more.
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  3. Posts : 3,846
    Windows 3.1 to Windows 10
       #13

    Yeah, maybe it is me.. Just thinking that these are not secret keys and
    that they have nothing to do with activation of the Windows 10 UPGRADE

    So may be best to just say "YOU MUST UPGRADE A QUALIFING OS" to get those keys
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  4. Posts : 61,577
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
       #14

    Kyhi said:
    Yeah, maybe it is me.. Just thinking that these are not secret keys and
    that they have nothing to do with activation of the Windows 10 UPGRADE

    So may be best to just say "YOU MUST UPGRADE A QUALIFING OS" to get those keys
    The problem is that it makes people think that you can activate with those keys, but in reality you can't.

    Those are just generic keys used to install with instead. The activation is registered for the free Windows 10 on Microsoft activation servers for the PC only after upgrading from an activated Windows 7/8.1 on that PC.

    People don't even need to use the generic keys to install with since they just select "skip" when asked for a key during Windows Setup.
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  5. Posts : 3,846
    Windows 3.1 to Windows 10
       #15
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 3,257
    Windows 10 Pro
       #16

    Brink said:
    Those are just generic keys used to install with instead. The activation is registered for the free Windows 10 on Microsoft activation servers for the PC only after upgrading from an activated Windows 7/8.1 on that PC.
    Doh!

    Now I understand what these keys are for, and why some people say they entered the key and it worked.

    By way of explanation, let's enter the wayback machine to the release of Windows 8.1. When this was released, many people wanted to install clean, but didn't have an 8.1 key, they only had an 8.0 key. If you tried to enter the 8.0 key in the prompt you get when you boot from media, it would not allow you to install. So Microsoft released "generic keys" that would allow you to install. These were 8.1 keys that passed the basic "boot key" check (this doesn't check if the key is valid, only that it is of the correct type, since when booting the CD you don't have network access).

    After you had Windows 8.1 installed with the Generic key, you could enter the 8.0 key in the "Change Key" section, and that would get applied and then activate correctly. You couldn't use the generic key to activate.

    Now, back to Windows 10....

    There are three ways to use ISO media to install, one is to upgrade directly through the Media Creation Tool, the second is to create the ISO media, mount it, then run the setup from within windows.. The third is to boot from CD and run the setup.

    Now, here's where people are running into trouble. If you boot from media, and use the generic key, this will allow you to install Windows 10. But it won't activate! Unlike Windows 8.1, you can't change the key to your Windows 7 or 8.x key and get it to activate. The only way is to do an upgrade install, by using Windows Update, or the first two methods I mention above.

    If you choose to do a clean install when you mount the media and run the setup program, then it will *NOT* accept the generic key, because at this point it will try to validate it against the activate servers because you have internet access when running inside your already running Windows.

    This finally explains the apparent incongruity of some people claiming they could use the generic key when installing, and other people were not able. Either way, using that key is ineffective.

    So, you may ask, what is the point of the generic key? Well, there is no point for anyone upgrading. However, let's say you want play around with Windows 10 before upgrading, or before buying a full key. You can use that key to install and play around with it, it will eventually expire though as using the OS unactivated is treated like an evaluation version.
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  7. Posts : 61,577
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
       #17

    Mystere said:
    Doh!

    Now I understand what these keys are for, and why some people say they entered the key and it worked.

    By way of explanation, let's enter the wayback machine to the release of Windows 8.1. When this was released, many people wanted to install clean, but didn't have an 8.1 key, they only had an 8.0 key. If you tried to enter the 8.0 key in the prompt you get when you boot from media, it would not allow you to install. So Microsoft released "generic keys" that would allow you to install. These were 8.1 keys that passed the basic "boot key" check (this doesn't check if the key is valid, only that it is of the correct type, since when booting the CD you don't have network access).

    After you had Windows 8.1 installed with the Generic key, you could enter the 8.0 key in the "Change Key" section, and that would get applied and then activate correctly. You couldn't use the generic key to activate.

    Now, back to Windows 10....

    There are three ways to use ISO media to install, one is to upgrade directly through the Media Creation Tool, the second is to create the ISO media, mount it, then run the setup from within windows.. The third is to boot from CD and run the setup.

    Now, here's where people are running into trouble. If you boot from media, and use the generic key, this will allow you to install Windows 10. But it won't activate! Unlike Windows 8.1, you can't change the key to your Windows 7 or 8.x key and get it to activate. The only way is to do an upgrade install, by using Windows Update, or the first two methods I mention above.

    If you choose to do a clean install when you mount the media and run the setup program, then it will *NOT* accept the generic key, because at this point it will try to validate it against the activate servers because you have internet access when running inside your already running Windows.

    This finally explains the apparent incongruity of some people claiming they could use the generic key when installing, and other people were not able. Either way, using that key is ineffective.

    So, you may ask, what is the point of the generic key? Well, there is no point for anyone upgrading. However, let's say you want play around with Windows 10 before upgrading, or before buying a full key. You can use that key to install and play around with it, it will eventually expire though as using the OS unactivated is treated like an evaluation version.
    Correct, but you can install Windows without having to enter a key to evaluate it unactivated.

    What will make this even more confusing for folks is that this only applies to the free Windows 10 upgrade offer.

    If you purchased Windows 10 (OEM or retail), then you'll get a product key to activate with as usual.
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  8. Posts : 3,257
    Windows 10 Pro
       #18

    Brink said:
    Correct, but you can install Windows without having to enter a key to evaluate it unactivated.

    What will make this even more confusing for folks is that this only applies to the free Windows 10 upgrade offer.

    If you purchased Windows 10 (OEM or retail), then you'll get a product key to activate with as usual.
    Good point, so really there is absolutely no use for the generic key.

    Indeed, it's hard to keep qualifying every statement to say it applies to the upgrade.
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  9. Posts : 61,577
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
       #19

    I hear that.
      My Computers


 

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