The prosecution and penalty for the transfer of an OEM license. Solved

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  1.    #21

    Bree said: View Post
    Excellent explanation, but one minor addition, that last change (the unique embedded OEM key) was introduced with Windows 8.
    Yes good point, but I don't think they got a Digital License? At least not when Windows 8 was first introduced? Thats kind of why I didn't mention it. I'm sure somebody will correct me if I'm wrong. I haven't run Windows 8 on my laptop for a long time.
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  2.    #22

    Another difference is you can add a SLIC table to pretty well any motherboard that uses legacy BIOS. If you go to the dark side of the Internet. You can also wipe it out if you flash with the wrong BIOS file.
    Not going to happen with embedded OEM keys. To the best of my knowledge they are burned in by the OEM and flashing your BIOS does not alter and or remove them, or add them. Thats more to Microsoft's liking l would think.
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  3. Bree's Avatar
    Posts : 11,933
    10 Home x64 (1903) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #23

    alphanumeric said: View Post
    Yes good point, but I don't think they got a Digital License? At least not when Windows 8 was first introduced? Thats kind of why I didn't mention it. I'm sure somebody will correct me if I'm wrong. I haven't run Windows 8 on my laptop for a long time.
    I haven't run it at all, held on to 7 for as long as possible then skipped to 10

    The embedded key was introduce for 8, that why I specifically said 'just that last change'. But as far as I can make out from Brink's tutorials on EightForums the activation worked the same way as in W7, a valid key had to be entered (typed, or read from the firmware) there was no such thing as 10's 'skip entering a key and activate from a digital licence'.

    Activate Windows 8 Online Tutorial | Windows 8 Help Forums
    Clean Install - Windows 8 Tutorial | Windows 8 Help Forums
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  4.    #24

    bobkn said: View Post
    It's not obvious why they couldn't file charges for theft of products or services
    Does using Activation TroubleShooter count as theft given the following?

    jimbo45 said: View Post
    An individual can't be held responsible for any defects in Ms's software
    Also, if it were a defect, it would have been fixed long ago.
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  5.    #25

    This is basically right from the horses mouth, and was posted on Microsoft's Private Yammer group. The original poster advised it was not under NDA (I specifically asked) so I can repost it here after removing any names etc. As far as I know he is a Microsoft employee and this is in his area of expertise.


    My recommendations to anyone delivering support to Windows users and this is not NDA.
    The Windows OEM License and an upgrade from an OEM License limits the use to the PC that it shipped on. But Microsoft has an exception process that will allow the license to be used after a repair (including Motherboard Replacement) if there is no sign of abuse on the license. To access this exception process you can run the Activation Troubleshooter and click that you have gone through a hardware change. This only works if prior to the hardware change you were running Windows with a Microsoft Account and that same account is used on the PC after the hardware change.
    Here is the help article.
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...ardware-change

    Use of a retail edition of Windows 10 to opt-in to Insider Builds would almost always indicate the end-user started with 'retail' media and a provided/included/downloaded product key which would seem to indicate an existing way back to their last retail release -i.e. the one they started with. Note: Joining an Insider Build using an OEM edition of Win10 is not a retail release edition and should not be interpretted otherwise.
    Additionally, the known inability to return to non-Insider build would be consistent with information made available(by MSFT) when joining the Insider program.
    •The experimental and early prerelease software and services might not be tested.
    •You might experience crashes, security vulnerabilities, data loss, or damage to your device
    •If you choose to stop receiving Windows Insider builds during a development cycle and need to recover your PC to a current Production Build, **you will need to install an earlier version of Windows using the Media Creation Tool**
    •Some of you might have want to roll back to your original operating system to no longer receive Windows Insider builds on one or more of your devices
    •If you do want to completely leave the Windows Insider Program, you’ll need to unregister, unenroll and **recover your device to a supported public build**.
    If a rollback works, then it remains as a potential method; if not, the methods to return to a non-Insider build seem quite clear even exclusive of long standing advice ==> routinely image your device using MSFT or 3rd party tools and always before major o/s changes.
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  6. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,656
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
       #26

    Hi there
    @alphnumeric

    Thanks for the explanation from Ms.

    It basically re-iterates the point which I think can be stated in Plain English is that if the wretched thing activates without you using any 3rd party bypass software etc and there's no obvious abuse of the license then you are "Free to Go".

    Also very sensible advice too -- always have plenty of backup so you can roll back or whatever without encountering other activation etc problems.

    Cheers
    jimbo
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  7.    #27

    I clipped and pasted that info to a text document as soon as I got the not under NDA reply. Figured it would come in handy at some point. It's not often that you get any good info that's repeatable outside of Microsoft's private forums. Some of my other inquiries went totally unanswered from anybody from Microsoft. Just other MVP's chiming in with no real answer. That's how it goes some times.
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  8. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,656
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
       #28

    alphanumeric said: View Post
    Another difference is you can add a SLIC table to pretty well any motherboard that uses legacy BIOS. If you go to the dark side of the Internet. You can also wipe it out if you flash with the wrong BIOS file.
    Not going to happen with embedded OEM keys. To the best of my knowledge they are burned in by the OEM and flashing your BIOS does not alter and or remove them, or add them. Thats more to Microsoft's liking l would think.
    Hi there
    Why not simply replace the BIOS although probably on modern mobos you'll not be able to unsolder it and insert a new one without breaking part of the printed circuit.

    You might also be able to get an expansion card that acts as the basic BIOS rather than the one on the Mobo -- never tried "these dark arts" myself but I do like tinkering around with hardware and still know how to use a soldering Iron / gun.

    Note if you do succeed as always people on this site do not encourage piracy of any sort so please ensure you have legal copy of Windows for the target machine.

    Cheers
    jimbo
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  9.    #29

    I don't want to go into any details as its to do with piracy, but what they do is add a SLIC table to a BIOS file, then flash that file to a PC. No need to bother replacing chips etc.
    Then they just source up the custom OEM install media that mates with that SLIC table. Its kind of why I think they went to the OEM embeded key. Or at least one of the reasons.
    The custom branded install media adds OEM logo's etc. So when you see an HP PC with say Dell logo's all over the place, you start to put two and two together.
    Flashing the BIOS on a Windows 8. 8.1, or 10 PC does not alter the OEM embedded key. It's permanently stored in a section not affected by a BIOS flash. Likely permanently burnt in at the factory.
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  10. Bree's Avatar
    Posts : 11,933
    10 Home x64 (1903) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #30

    alphanumeric said: View Post
    ... when you see an HP PC with say Dell logo's all over the place, you start to put two and two together.
    Actually, that's quite easy to do by accident (as some posters have found to their cost). Just make a recovery drive that includes system files on an OEM Dell PC then use that to do a clean install on an HP, it will include all the Dell branding. I don't think that violates the EULA (well, not the MS one, maybe Dell's).
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