Windows 10: W10 licence transfer. What happens if I change/upgrade my PC later on? Solved

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  1.    31 Jul 2015 #31

    You two are debating semantics now, rather than process and terms. License is often used to mean key and vice versa. In fact, they used to be referred to as license keys.

    The EULA does mention stand-alone software, which I take to mean the retail box version, not what is downloaded. I would fully expect the retail box version to be transferable to different devices.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  2. Posts : 167
    Windows 7 Ultimate 64
       31 Jul 2015 #32

    DeaconFrost said: View Post
    The EULA does mention stand-alone software, which I take to mean the retail box version, not what is downloaded. I would fully expect the retail box version to be transferable to different devices.
    http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Usete...10_English.htm

    b. Stand-alone software. If you acquired the software as stand-alone software (and also if you upgraded from software you acquired as stand-alone software), you may transfer the software to another device that belongs to you. You may also transfer the software to a device owned by someone else if (i) you are the first licensed user of the software and (ii) the new user agrees to the terms of this agreement. You may use the backup copy we allow you to make or the media that the software came on to transfer the software. Every time you transfer the software to a new device, you must remove the software from the prior device. You may not transfer the software to share licenses between devices.



    So our retail Win 7 / 8 copies retain their original transfer rights after an upgrade to Windows 10.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    31 Jul 2015 #33

    NO WIN10 LICENSE NUMBERS FOR UPGRADES. It is just a generic number for all Win10 upgrades: VK7JG-NPHTM-C97JM-9MPGT-3V66T. The real product key is stored on the motherboard and is the the product key that comes from the initial Win7/Win8.1 OS. This is a completely NEW process that MS is doing for the upgrade. If you want a real Win10 Retail Product Key, you will have to buy a retail copy of Windows 10 Home or Pro. The upgrade is free, MS does not have to provide you a way to move the upgrade around to other hardware. It is just like the old OEM Windows keys in that regard. Don't believe me? Run keyfinder:

    Click image for larger version. 

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      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    31 Jul 2015 #34

    Delicieuxz said: View Post
    So our retail Win 7 / 8 copies retain their original transfer rights after an upgrade to Windows 10.
    Assuming the original licenses aren't negated by the upgrade, this was never in question. You can't transfer the Windows 10 license (or key, whichever you prefer to use) to the new system. You'll need to install the previous version, activate, and then upgrade. That process will need to be repeated for each device. The point is, you can't upgrade and activate Windows 10 on one computer, then go right to a clean install on another device with Windows 10.....unless you were to purchase the stand-alone, boxed version.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    31 Jul 2015 #35

    John Pombrio said: View Post
    It is just like the old OEM Windows keys in that regard.
    Exactly. It's as if we're getting free OEM licenses.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    31 Jul 2015 #36

    DeaconFrost said: View Post
    Assuming the original licenses aren't negated by the upgrade, this was never in question. You can't transfer the Windows 10 license (or key, whichever you prefer to use) to the new system. You'll need to install the previous version, activate, and then upgrade. That process will need to be repeated for each device. The point is, you can't upgrade and activate Windows 10 on one computer, then go right to a clean install on another device with Windows 10.....unless you were to purchase the stand-alone, boxed version.
    Just don't count on using the same Win8.1 license number on another machine that came from your first upgraded computer and expect it to activate or be able to upgrade to an activated Win10 while continuing to run the 1st computer on Win10. Even moving the Win8.1 copy to a new computer will require you to contact MS and 'splain it to them. As Robert Heinlein wrote "TANSTAAFL".
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 67
    Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
       31 Jul 2015 #37

    Delicieuxz said: View Post
    Every time you transfer the software to a new device, you must remove the software from the prior device..
    How literally is that meant?

    Can I simply agree to never boot from that device again?

    How about if I just put the hard drive in the closet and don't "remove the software" from anything?

    Must I reformat the partition? How do I convince MS I did or didn't do that?

    Must I formally log into or contact MS in some way and "deactivate" something?

    But I fully expect EULAs to remain unclear on finer points and expect the real world to correspond to something else--whatever MS decides to actually enforce. That will be revealed by what various experimenters attempt to do over the coming weeks. In the meantime, I'll run Windows 7 Retail.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    31 Jul 2015 #38

    That's why I added my first line starting with assuming. In versions past, when you took a full license and used the upgrade (cheaper) version of the newer OS, your previous license was negated. I assumed that was true in this case, so once you upgrade a license, it's no longer valid for future use (as the previous OS). Delicieuxz is saying that doesn't happen this time around, so it remains to be seen.

    I can see both outcomes happening. On one hand, if your 8.1 license was retail, it should be able to be moved. However, that could allow a person to buy one legal license of 8.1, and use it to upgrade an entire household worth of computers to Windows 10.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    31 Jul 2015 #39

    Geez. MS's policy has been the same since Win7. If you bought a RETAIL version of the OS, you can move it to any computer you want. What you CANNOT do is to have TWO ACTIVATED computers running the same product key AND connected to the internet. So move the license around as much as you want. Just don't expect to have two computers running normally by using just one key, MS figured that scam out a long time ago. That is still true after a Win10 upgrade as the computer's product key is still the original one from Win8.1. Win10 upgrades have no product key of their own, just the one from the previous OS that you upgraded from.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  10.    31 Jul 2015 #40

    DeaconFrost said: View Post
    The EULA does mention stand-alone software, which I take to mean the retail box version, not what is downloaded. I would fully expect the retail box version to be transferable to different devices.
    That's my interpretation, too. If you buy a Retail copy, you can install that on one machine, and later, transfer that to a second machine, presuming you then remove it from the first. But the "free upgrade" (IMHO) does not work that way. It can be applied to one machine, but it is only good for "the life of that device". When that device gets replaced, you have a new device and even though you could "technically" install your Win10 copy to that device using an ISO you made from the old device, it would (most likely) NOT activate because the hash code generated from the hardware of the new device is going to be different from the hash code generated from the hardware of the old device -- the device that was associated with the activation of that copy of Windows 10.

    If this were NOT true, that is, if the activation was only tied to the product key, then why does MS warn that if you make major hardware changes to the device, you may have to contact MS Support to reactivate your device? Historically, activation has been tied to specific devices through the generation of hash codes -- which were then stored on the activation servers. Why would this no longer be true of Win10 -- given the warning that MS has issued about hardware changes?
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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