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  1.    03 Jun 2015 #31
    Join Date : Apr 2015
    Posts : 12,588
    W10Prox64

    Quote Originally Posted by Burgurne View Post
    Okay. My latest experience with mobo+CPU upgrade.
    If I ahve done this 6 month later, I would have to buy a new Windows licence after what you write. It went like this:

    I got new mobo and CPU (gigabyte Sniper and a i7 4790K), clean installed Windows (let's say that was my "free" update to win10). It went well, and the PC ran for about 5 weeks. Then the mobo died (ie I cound not boot from either of the BIOS on it). I send it to RMA. After 2 weeks I got tired of waiting, so I went online and bought a new mobo. Gigabyte Sniper was not in stock, so I got an ASUS MAXIMUS mobo instead. Installed it, and then I had to clean install Windows again, as some of the parts was not the same, allthough the chipset was the same.

    Now, reading your definition I understand it this way, I then would have to buy a new Windows 10 licence since I have changed the mobo. Is that what you are calling "changing device"? Just because the mobo has been replaced?

    I do not hope so.
    It is quite possible that your validation would require a phone call to MS for manual activation. I have had this happen in the past when replacing the MB.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    03 Jun 2015 #32
    Join Date : Oct 2014
    Posts : 1,424
    win 10 Insider

    I've also had no problem with the telephone validation.

    Some of our desktops are like granddad's axe! As long as you use the same case you'll be right
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    03 Jun 2015 #33
    Join Date : May 2015
    Oakville
    Posts : 21
    XP/7/8.1/10 PRO 10586

    Quote Originally Posted by Burgurne View Post
    Okay. My latest experience with mobo+CPU upgrade.
    If I ahve done this 6 month later, I would have to buy a new Windows licence after what you write. It went like this:

    I got new mobo and CPU (gigabyte Sniper and a i7 4790K), clean installed Windows (let's say that was my "free" update to win10). It went well, and the PC ran for about 5 weeks. Then the mobo died (ie I cound not boot from either of the BIOS on it). I send it to RMA. After 2 weeks I got tired of waiting, so I went online and bought a new mobo. Gigabyte Sniper was not in stock, so I got an ASUS MAXIMUS mobo instead. Installed it, and then I had to clean install Windows again, as some of the parts was not the same, allthough the chipset was the same.

    Now, reading your definition I understand it this way, I then would have to buy a new Windows 10 licence since I have changed the mobo. Is that what you are calling "changing device"? Just because the mobo has been replaced?

    I do not hope so.
    Yes, that is called changing a device, the pros here answered that for you and I did some digging myself to find out the information.

    What is the difference between RETAIL and OEM Windows license:
    - OEM versions of Windows 7 are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:
    - OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel
    - OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on
    - OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard
    - OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system

    With a retail version, you can transfer it to another computer, change your motherboard.
    http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/lice...hobbyists.aspx

    - OEM is one time install. if you try to install it on another computer you cant register it because they see its a different motherboard. Retail you can call them up and change the key over to another motherboard 5 times.
    - OEM if your motherboard dies and you cant find the same one to replace it you need to rebuy windows. upgrading anything else is fine though.

    Software-wise, OEM Windows 7 are identical to Retail versions. The only differences are of legal nature:

    - OEM is locked to one computer, although the only component checked is the motherboard - you can change other components at will. I'm not completely sure, but after replacing the motherboard (e.g. when it fails and you get RMA for the exact same model) you might need to reactivate the system by phone.
    - OEM does not come with free Microsoft direct support
    - OEM is locked to the computer it is bought with (technically you can activate it on any other computer but that's against the purchase agreement, so from legal standpoint it is no different from installing a pirated version)
    - OEM cannot be directly upgraded from an older version of Windows OS (if you are using Windows XP it is not an issue, because it is technically impossible to upgrade from XP to 7, you have to make a new, clean installation. Same applies to process of switching from 32-bit to 64-bit OS).

    So there are your answer's there. If you upgrade from Windows 7 or 8 to Windows 10 and its OEM you cannot change the motherboard. If you buy Windows 10 from newegg OEM for $109, again you cannot change the motherboard.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    03 Jun 2015 #34
    Join Date : Oct 2014
    Posts : 1,552
    W7 32 bit, Linux Mint Xfce 18 64 bit

    It is technically possible to upgrade an oem version of windows xp to windows 10. You would upgrade to vista, then upgrade to windows 7 then to windows 10 provided your hardware can support it.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    03 Jun 2015 #35
    Join Date : Jun 2015
    Western NC
    Posts : 27
    Windows 8.1/Windows 10 x64

    I know some about a lot of things, but not everything about something. Isn't the motherboard ID'd by the BIOS string? If so, are we transmitting that ?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  6.    04 Jun 2015 #36
    Join Date : Sep 2014
    Nashville, TN
    Posts : 3,143
    Windows 10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandman View Post
    I know some about a lot of things, but not everything about something. Isn't the motherboard ID'd by the BIOS string? If so, are we transmitting that ?
    Microsoft published a white paper a long time ago that described exactly how activation worked. Essentially, they take all the ID's in your system, and string them together, then they run an cryptographic hash on it so they are not transmitting the actual ID's, but rather a one-way hash (like an md5 or sha1).

    So when your hardware changes, so too does the hash.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    04 Jun 2015 #37
    Join Date : Oct 2014
    Posts : 1,552
    W7 32 bit, Linux Mint Xfce 18 64 bit

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandman View Post
    I know some about a lot of things, but not everything about something. Isn't the motherboard ID'd by the BIOS string? If so, are we transmitting that ?

    Well it is number of factors. My motherboard was replace under warranty by Dell and I had no problems with activation. I was sent a dell re-installation disk (Dell support sent me one earlier in the year for another problem.) I had no problems with dell re-installation disk either (Before & After the Motherboard Replacement). My system is Dell oemslp pre-activated system. I might have an issue with the windows 10 upgrade which I may need to use the key on the back of my computer but I decided not to upgrade to windows 10 even though it is a free upgrade.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    04 Jun 2015 #38
    Join Date : Apr 2015
    Posts : 12,588
    W10Prox64

    Quote Originally Posted by groze View Post
    It is technically possible to upgrade an oem version of windows xp to windows 10. You would upgrade to vista, then upgrade to windows 7 then to windows 10 provided your hardware can support it.
    and you would need legitimate, "activate-able" keycodes for each OS, validating with MS upon each upgrade before proceeding with the next
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    04 Jun 2015 #39
    Join Date : May 2015
    Posts : 112
    Win 7

    I would recommend to do a "fresh" install. This will cleanup wasted space and get most people to do a most likely long awaited backup of their data. Another plus is a "fresh" install is less prone to bugs and glitches from old files and updates that don't get updated or removed.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  10.    04 Jun 2015 #40
    Join Date : Dec 2013
    Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts : 10,248
    Windows 10 IoT

    Quote Originally Posted by Burgurne View Post
    Okay. My latest experience with mobo+CPU upgrade.
    If I ahve done this 6 month later, I would have to buy a new Windows licence after what you write. It went like this:

    I got new mobo and CPU (gigabyte Sniper and a i7 4790K), clean installed Windows (let's say that was my "free" update to win10). It went well, and the PC ran for about 5 weeks. Then the mobo died (ie I cound not boot from either of the BIOS on it). I send it to RMA. After 2 weeks I got tired of waiting, so I went online and bought a new mobo. Gigabyte Sniper was not in stock, so I got an ASUS MAXIMUS mobo instead. Installed it, and then I had to clean install Windows again, as some of the parts was not the same, allthough the chipset was the same.

    Now, reading your definition I understand it this way, I then would have to buy a new Windows 10 licence since I have changed the mobo. Is that what you are calling "changing device"? Just because the mobo has been replaced?

    I do not hope so.
    In most instances changing out the motherboard for a different make or model will trigger an activation request. To Microsoft it looks like an activation on a second different PC. If its a Retail version, do the phone activation and when asked how many PC's this key is used on say 1. You will then get a code to type in an activate with. If it's an OEM System Builder version, do the phone activation and explain what happened. Motherboard died and you could not find exact replacement. Then as before you'll likely get an activation code to type in.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
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