Microsoft Won’t Bring Back the Windows Experience Index in Windows 10

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    Microsoft Won’t Bring Back the Windows Experience Index in Windows 10

    Microsoft Won’t Bring Back the Windows Experience Index in Windows 10


    Posted: 04 May 2015

    Microsoft removed the Windows Experience Index in Windows 8.1 despite the fact that quite a lot of people used it and liked it in Windows 7, and because Windows 10 is a game changer and the company is expected to offer the features that users want, everyone hopes to see this tool return on their desktops.

    But unfortunately for those who considered the WEI helpful, that’s not going to happen, and a company engineer confirmed this in a recent post on UserVoice.
    Basically, the reason for not bringing the Windows Experience Index back in Windows concerns the small number of people who actually used it, and the Windows engineer says that there are already third-party software solutions out there that can do pretty much the same thing.
    As a result, the work needed to make this part of Windows 10 simply doesn’t make sense, so here you go, the new operating system won’t allow you to measure system performance.
    Source
    labeeman's Avatar Posted By: labeeman
    04 May 2015


  1. Posts : 22,740
    Windows 10 Home x64
       #1

    It was nice but there are other methods to get the same information.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 4,224
    Windows 10
       #2

    Sergey Tkachenko has created a port of this program that runs on Windows 8 versions, and also runs on Windows 10 (I've used it repeatedly on various test systems running the technical and insider previews). Find it online at Downloads / Software / Winaero WEI Tool. No biggie!
    --Ed--

    -win10-wei.jpg
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 3,257
    Windows 10 Pro
       #3

    I know a lot of people will argue that they used WEI a lot, but not from MS's point of view. MS's point of view revolves around the purpose of WEI. WEI was a marketing tool to help drive people to the Windows Marketplace, which almost nobody used. The idea was that you could get a WEI score and then go to the marketplace and buy software that your WEI could handle.

    So, since nobody was using the Windows Marketplace, the purpose of the WEI... WEI is "not being used", at least for the purpose they intended it to be used for.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 457
    Windows 10
       #4

    -2015-05-05_19-06-37.jpg


    What I dont understand is why Graphics and Desktop Graphics have different ratings, I thought graphics was graphics.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 1,778
    Windows 10 Pro,
       #5

    Thanks for that link. I will have to try this.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 27,249
    Win11 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       #6

    AlanWade said:
    -2015-05-05_19-06-37.jpg


    What I dont understand is why Graphics and Desktop Graphics have different ratings, I thought graphics was graphics.

    Found this helpfulMe Too1
    Answer
    Vijay B replied on January 22, 2013

    Microsoft Support Engineer

    Hi,

    From your issue description, I understand that You want to know the difference between graphics and gaming graphics. Please let me know if you are not facing this issue.

    Windows Experience Index scores currently range from 1 to 5.9. Your computer is rated with an overall score, called the base score, and with subscores for each of five individual hardware components: processor, memory, graphics, gaming graphics, and primary hard disk. The base score is determined from the lowest of the five subscores, because your computer's performance is limited by its slowest or least-powerful hardware component.

    Graphics subscore: This subscore indicates how well a computer will run Windows Aeroand play videos. This measurement is based on video memory bandwidth (megabytes per second), so the higher the dedicated graphics memory in your video card, the better this score is likely to be. A 256-megabyte (MB) video card, for example, is almost certain to get a higher score than a 128-MB card.

    Any graphics card that doesn't support Microsoft* DirectX 9 automatically receives a score of 1.0, regardless of other factors. Also note that a video card using a driver that doesn't support Windows Vista Display Driver Model (WDDM) can't receive a score higher than 1.9. (DirectX 9 and WDDM are requirements for Windows Aero.)

    Gaming graphics subscore: This subscore is based upon the frames per second at which the video card can handle different textures. If the video card doesn't support Microsoft* Direct3D 9, it automatically receives a score of 1.0. A card that supports Direct3D 9, DirectX 9, and WDDM automatically receives a score of at least 2.0.

    Hope this information is helpful and do let us know if you need further assistance with Windows in future. We will be glad to assist.


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    In short it only has to do with Microsoft products and nothing to do with how good your PC is.
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 457
    Windows 10
       #7

    Thanks Cliff :)
      My Computer


  8. Lee
    Posts : 4,793
    OS X, Win 10
       #8

    Really no big deal. . .hopefully it won't be beaten to . . .
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 27,249
    Win11 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       #9

    AlanWade said:
    Thanks Cliff :)
    You're welcome. I used to wonder too, what the difference was back in Windows 7, and why there could be such a large difference.
      My Computers


 

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