Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
  1.    08 Feb 2016 #41
    Join Date : Jan 2014
    Oak Ridge TN, USA
    Posts : 24,523
    Windows 10 Pro x64

    [QUOTE=Looey;560813]
    Quote Originally Posted by BunnyJ View Post
    Core things are painstakingly tested and bug free. But lots still have bugs.

    Just out of curiosity.. what is your programming/IT experience??[/QUO

    32.5 years in large data centers. My experience includes front end processors, implementing VTAM in a large nation wide company network (Subarea, CDRM and CDRSC are a few terms that should convince you), data center security using IBM's medium size computer, automating mainframes with scripts that automated IPLs and Shutdowns along with NJE node monitoring and automatic replies to operator commands like changing forms in a Xerox printer (don't need form changes in a Xerox mainframe printers), installing mainframes and their associated system OS, maintained Xerox large laser printers and their internal forms that had to be coded (some were networked from world headquarters in Morristown, NJ to a factory datacenters, implemented hardware and software to add server's to mainframes, consolidate data centers from other parts of the country into very large one, installed fiber ring to the POP (lot of water in those underground pipes under the streets), installed and maintained Cisco routers, wired a huge building with twisted pair wire and patch panels after moving away from IBM's coax, learned Cobol and assembler, worked with programmers on extended testing of changes before cutover, Represent data center in change control meetings, Knew how to program DDM1000 and multiplexers(muxes) that can breakout DS3s to T1 levels, created a T1 patch panel that another company patented and I am tired of typing this stuff but there is more computer related I did that I was very good at in my lifetime that enabled me to keep a job in that field for over 32 years like networking 350 servers in the same building with 8 IBM JES complexes or implementing bulk data transfer networks. I traveled a lot, sometimes shipping a scope ahead of me) and was stuck in Newark, NJ due to cancelled flights so I paid my dues. I know you were doubting me with your question. I am not an insider on this web site but I like most of the comments and learn from people.
    Wow.. that is cool. Thanks for sharing!!

    Jeff
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    12 Feb 2016 #42
    Join Date : Feb 2015
    Left coast but not a progressive liberal
    Posts : 964
    dual boot W10 10586th2/14291 rs1 Win. Insider since Jan. 2015

    No new Win insider build this week .....looks like they are pushing out a new Win Insiders Office 365 build though .
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  3.    12 Feb 2016 #43
    Join Date : Oct 2014
    Posts : 513
    10x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost82 View Post
    I think I'm not explaining myself.

    The oldes here will remember how companies used to work a few years ago. They developed a new version of some software, and they just polished it until it was 99,9% perfect. Then, they released that software being sure that it was the final version. Yeah, of course, some revisions happened on the way, but now we are on a kind of constant patching in every type of software.
    I understand that it may have seemed that way, but in reality it never was...;) I started my experience in the 80's and back then the entire global annual computer market was < 6 million sales per year...and C= reached a peak of 1 million Amiga sales annually in the late 80's...back then, software for MS-DOS machines (and they were all incompatible with each other back then!) came on floppies, memory was incredibly tiny by today's standards and hard drives were just becoming available for consumers. The C= Amiga in ~1988 was the only commercially available home computer that supported preemptive multitasking ROOB. I remember one game developer writing and saying he "couldn't imagine writing a game that might take an entire 1.44MB floppy disk," for instance. Programs and environments back then were at least an order of magnitude simpler than is the case today.

    Today we have preemptive multitasking environments everywhere, gigabytes of 64-bit wide ram, and terabytes of hard drive space--processors with 2,4,8 + more cores, GPUs with literally hundreds/thousands of cores--all kinds of stuff going on that simply didn't apply in the old days...;) When I think of how much more complex the environment is today I sometimes think it's a wonder that developers get out the software that they do...but today we've also got much better languages, compilers, you name it. I have a lot of nostalgia for those days because we were all working by the seat of our pants and it was a heck of a good time--but would I want to return? Not on your life...;) It's so much better today...in every way...
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    12 Feb 2016 #44
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 3,808
    10 Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by waltc View Post
    I understand that it may have seemed that way, but in reality it never was... I started my experience in the 80's and back then the entire global annual computer market was < 6 million sales per year...and C= reached a peak of 1 million Amiga sales annually in the late 80's...back then, software for MS-DOS machines (and they were all incompatible with each other back then!) came on floppies, memory was incredibly tiny by today's standards and hard drives were just becoming available for consumers. The C= Amiga in ~1988 was the only commercially available home computer that supported preemptive multitasking ROOB. I remember one game developer writing and saying he "couldn't imagine writing a game that might take an entire 1.44MB floppy disk," for instance. Programs and environments back then were at least an order of magnitude simpler than is the case today.

    Today we have preemptive multitasking environments everywhere, gigabytes of 64-bit wide ram, and terabytes of hard drive space--processors with 2,4,8 + more cores, GPUs with literally hundreds/thousands of cores--all kinds of stuff going on that simply didn't apply in the old days... When I think of how much more complex the environment is today I sometimes think it's a wonder that developers get out the software that they do...but today we've also got much better languages, compilers, you name it. I have a lot of nostalgia for those days because we were all working by the seat of our pants and it was a heck of a good time--but would I want to return? Not on your life... It's so much better today...in every way...
    After a couple of reads I haven't got your point.

    Was it better in these mythical "good old days" than today? Or not?

    Or was the past just a little bit fabulous, the present merely great and the future will be only slightly wonderful?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  5.    12 Feb 2016 #45
    Join Date : Jan 2014
    Oak Ridge TN, USA
    Posts : 24,523
    Windows 10 Pro x64

    Quote Originally Posted by lx07 View Post
    After a couple of reads I haven't got your point.

    Was it better in these mythical "good old days" than today? Or not?

    Or was the past just a little bit fabulous, the present merely great and the future will be only slightly wonderful?
    When I think back on the 80's I recall lots of multitasking at work.. with and without computers.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  6.    12 Feb 2016 #46

    It's just different (I started with hardware/software in 1965). I doubt you have ever run an operator's console without keyboard or monitor, used paper tape for data storage, punch cards for data input, or plug boards and wires to program. I did.

    Today cats can play games on palmtop computers and billions of devices and users are connected. A first class setup no longer costs a major fraction of the United States Federal Budget. Ordinary people have more compute and communication power in their pockets/purses than the rig I ran in 1965, which occupied two square blocks and cost in today's dollars over $100,000,000,000.00USD.

    Then, our main focuses were strategic nuclear weapons design and use, and data processing for the largest business and government organizations. Now, its media consumption, even production, and connecting with friends or people with similar interests.

    Then, every computer was unique at least in some of its details. Now, the devices are commodities but after the users have added and configured and used a potentially enormous amount of software, they are still unique lol, as users often discover when their mileage varies.

    From the user viewing the software, I think the biggest change is that users can in many cases modify the software’s behavior significantly, particularly with Linux, or even the software itself if it’s open source.

    Quote Originally Posted by lx07 View Post
    After a couple of reads I haven't got your point.
    Was it better in these mythical "good old days" than today? Or not?

    Or was the past just a little bit fabulous, the present merely great and the future will be only slightly wonderful?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    12 Feb 2016 #47
    Join Date : Oct 2014
    Posts : 17,861
    Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 16281

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost82 View Post
    Even if you're not on the insider program, the OS seems to be not finished. Can you count how many updates we had since july? Is not only about Windows 10, is in almost every type of software.
    That's the way Windows works now. When a new feature has been tested and found stable, it's usually rolled up into a cumulative update.

    I'm surprised you haven't seen "Windows as a Service" splattered all over the Internet.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    12 Feb 2016 #48
    Join Date : Jun 2014
    Posts : 5,544
    Windows 10 Pro

    @johnwerneken, I remember when they use to send coupons in the mail and they were on punch cards.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  9.    12 Feb 2016 #49
    Join Date : Oct 2014
    Posts : 17,861
    Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 16281

    Quote Originally Posted by hTconeM9user View Post
    I agree with you fully on this.
    Some Posters all they do is have a go at Microsoft all the time, and I think post just for the sake of it,
    If they think 10 is no good then they probably never had to use windows 95, 98 or any of the earlier ones.
    I remember when 7 first came out how much trouble that gave, look how long it has taken to put that right and still doing so.
    Yeppers, Windows 95 and 98 were the best we could get; however, they were far and away better than their predecessors! But they still crashed regularly and we had to live with that.

    We beta testers told Microsoft that Vista wasn't ready for prime time, but Marketing had its way and Vista was released half baked. Once released, the Media had a field day bashing Vista and the rest is history.

    Then we got Windows 7 for testing right after Vista was released. I used Win 7 as my main OS and it rarely crashed! Yet again, though, we told Microsoft it wasn't ready, but Marketing once again had its way. Service Pack 1 put Seven to rights, though.

    I didn't get to test Windows 8 until it was released for public testing. I hated it, and evidently the media did too, because they did quite a hatchet job on it.

    It's strange, but it seems every other release of Windows gets attacked by the media.

    For me, the Windows 10 Insider builds are stable and I pretty much use the test machine for daily work. Of course, I have all my data on external drives just in case . . .
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  10.    13 Feb 2016 #50

    Ahhhh, yes the good old days.

    What some may forget is that in "the good old days" home computing was in it's infancy and constantly changing. Some things may have seemed more stable, because there were fewer parts. Plus the whole industy was mutating so fast, hardware and software, you didn't know who was leading. I remember, not even thinking about installing a new OS until at least 2 years after it had been out, just to make sure the bugs were ironed out, that is the way it was when I went from ME to XP and XP to 7 took me years (I skipped Vista all together), but now. 8 was dead nearly a year later, and they were forcing 8.1 down our throats, now just a year or two later we have Windows 10, they are cramming down our throats. I didn't think it was ready when they released it, I still don't think it is ready. But to hear some, they seem to think it is the 2nd coming of Christ. Ahhh yes, I miss the good old days, when an OS became obsolete at least 3-5 years after release.

    I am not talking just about Windows, but all software it seems, is released this way. You can't get a game without expecting a zillion patches within the next year. Try before you buy is becoming a rarity. It is just that society is being eased into sloppy programming practices because of the bottom line. Nothing will ever be produced quick enough to earn the almighty fast and dirty buck.

    It makes me cringe when people say "all programs have glitches", yes, it is true, but some more than others and the glitches are becoming the norm rather than the rarity. It is simply sloppy work ethics, and that is just the start of it. There seems to be no pride in producing and releasing a good product any more.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast


Similar Threads
Thread Forum
Insider Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14257
695034380524216320 Source: Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14257 | Windows Experience Blog
Windows 10 News
Build 14257 04/02/16
New build loaded today appears to have resolved the absence of email printing and missing bluetooth function I wonder what new function errors will come to light ? :(
Installation and Upgrade
Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14257
Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 14257 https://www.tenforums.com/windows-10-news/39650-announcing-windows-10-insider-preview-build-14257-a.html ;)
Windows Insider
Insider Windows 10 Build 14257 could be the next Insider build
694995530011820033 More: http://microsoft-news.com/redstone-build-14257-could-be-the-upcoming-build-for-insiders/
Windows 10 News
New Windows 10 Redstone build 11103 has leaked onto the web
New Windows 10 Redstone build 11103 has leaked onto the web Read more: http://www.winbeta.org/news/windows-10-redstone-build-11103-has-leaked-onto-the-web
Windows 10 News
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 20:08.
Find Us
Twitter Facebook Google+ Ten Forums iOS App Ten Forums Android App



Windows 10 Forums