Windows 10: As 2015 comes to a close, Windows 10 surpasses 200 million installs

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  1.    10 Jan 2016 #141

    whs said: View Post
    I am not picking on 10. If it works for you, that's fine. All I am saying is that a switch from 7 to 10 is probably not worth the extra effort because 10 has little additional things over 7.
    Hi there

    Oh really dear dear dear !!!

    I think ONE reason assuming you are using Windows and no NAS boxes etc is that with huge multi-media files etc is that even with largish HDD's you might find your multi-media libraries can easily outgrow the size of typical HDD's.

    Since W8 the concept of Storage spaces has been added which allow you to aggregate Physical volumes -- which unlike RAID --- can be of DIFFERENT capacities!!!! -- into logical Data storage pools / spaces and you can dynamically add more volumes when you need. You can also use mirroring / striping as Software RAID also without the need of physical volumes having to be the same size.

    While W7 can READ these data spaces it can't create them or have them on its own machine. You have to share files from W8 and higher computers.

    I've found this a really useful feature - and a good use for older HDD's that have been replaced with larger capacity ones -- I'm using 4 X 750 GB HDD's as an approx. 3 TB storage space.

    (Linux users can consider Windows storage spaces as LVM in their distros -- approx. similar. Incidentally using Storage spaces for RAID - especially as you can have different sized volumes in the mix works very well indeed - you won't need on a home computer a RAID hardware controller any more.).

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    10 Jan 2016 #142

    Night Hawk said: View Post
    As far as how good 10 is it acts well and performs well with critics on both side of the 10/7 dispute. So far it was worth buying a 10 license since most everything that ran on 7 besides the need to see a few programs get newer versions like the av software and a few others will run without problem on 10. And once you get past the initial GUI appearance changes it acts a bit more like 7 then 8 did for sure but still sees the Stripped down form of WMP and only with the free upgrade do you get the new Windows DVD Player added in as an update.
    Actually, I'm surprised when Windows 10 is compared to be more closely acting like Windows 7. If you add Classic Shell (yes I realize it isn't part of the OS), and conceal Metro/Modern completely, Windows 8 and 8.1 act A LOT more like Windows 7. The Control Panel is almost identical. System Properties and other dialogs are page for page. So you just get the kernel improvements.

    Night Hawk said: View Post
    The real travesty however isn't with 10 at all but how MS slammed people with 8! and why you never never see any mention of 8 while you will hear about 8.1! 8 was a major fumble on their part there in how they trashed the OS! 10 on the other hand as I was saying before is where 8 should have been as the next to come if MS had been following the progression of 7 over Vista in order to continue on the productive direction. But they had too much attention focused on Surface and RT simply borrowing that OS's gui for 8! The fact that 10 still runs on 1gb on the other hand shows how MS has made progress under the hood where previous versions like the XP to Vista debacle was from MS understating what Vista needed for memory namely 1gb or more but specifying 512mb only which flopped! Without this type of progress 10 would likely require 6-8gb rather the bare minimum of only 1gb with 4-8gb a good call for the 64bit flavor.
    Some good points here. I would likely say that Windows 8.1 was what Windows 8 should be, except there should have been an update to natively include the Start Menu. It could have been defeated the same way that that Windows 10 allows a full Start Screen. The fact that Microsoft delayed that feature so that Windows 10 would include another "must-have" doesn't make Windows 8.1 a bad product.

    When Windows 8 came out, I HATED it. But when I started supporting Windows 8.1 on friend's systems, I really started to fall in love with it. (As a quick aside ... I was always "meh" about Windows 7. I actually hated how people snubbed Vista because of its bad RTM impression. SP2 fixed all of that, had a more conventional Start/Quick Launch/Taskbar that resembled the XP-style (I was never a fan of the new Windows 7 grouped taskbar, where I choose a thumbnail to select an app instance. (trust me, if you're recording on Audition and need to go click a script in WordPad, you want to just click that application taskbar box directly, and quickly.) but I grew to love Windows 8. It felt like a faster, flatter Windows 7. And I could just customize either taskbar to reflect Vista's.

    I recently moved over to Windows 8 myself. Yes I know it runs out of support this Tuesday, but I run a well-working HP xw8200 Workstation. And my processors won't support the x64 versions of Windows 8.1 or 10. But even though the Xeons I have are Netburst-style and old, it's still a brisk system. I am sure if I just keep updating Windows Defender defintions, and browse carefully, I'll be fine.

    I agree that too much effort was put into the RT builds and the poor-selling Surface. but if the Surface met a lower price point I would bite. There were some Asus tablets with Windows 8.1 and 10 and they look snazzy.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    10 Jan 2016 #143

    jimbo45 said: View Post
    Hi there

    Oh really dear dear dear !!!

    I think ONE reason assuming you are using Windows and no NAS boxes etc is that with huge multi-media files etc is that even with largish HDD's you might find your multi-media libraries can easily outgrow the size of typical HDD's.

    Since W8 the concept of Storage spaces has been added which allow you to aggregate Physical volumes -- which unlike RAID --- can be of DIFFERENT capacities!!!! -- into logical Data storage pools / spaces and you can dynamically add more volumes when you need. You can also use mirroring / striping as Software RAID also without the need of physical volumes having to be the same size.

    While W7 can READ these data spaces it can't create them or have them on its own machine. You have to share files from W8 and higher computers.

    I've found this a really useful feature - and a good use for older HDD's that have been replaced with larger capacity ones -- I'm using 4 X 750 GB HDD's as an approx. 3 TB storage space.

    (Linux users can consider Windows storage spaces as LVM in their distros -- approx. similar. Incidentally using Storage spaces for RAID - especially as you can have different sized volumes in the mix works very well indeed - you won't need on a home computer a RAID hardware controller any more.).

    Cheers
    jimbo
    Jimbo, I don't have the faintest idea what you are talking about.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    10 Jan 2016 #144

    whs said: View Post
    Jimbo, I don't have the faintest idea what you are talking about.
    You don't want all your small drives seen as one big drive? I do like Windows 10 but I don't think the average user will ever need that feature. As for me if I need more storage space I'll buy a bigger drive.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    10 Jan 2016 #145

    Now that makes sense.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  6. Posts : 3,361
    W10 Pro x64/W7 Ultimate x64 dual boot main - W10 Pro Insider Preview/W7 Pro x64 - remote pc
       11 Jan 2016 #146

    Jody Thornton said: View Post
    Actually, I'm surprised when Windows 10 is compared to be more closely acting like Windows 7. If you add Classic Shell (yes I realize it isn't part of the OS), and conceal Metro/Modern completely, Windows 8 and 8.1 act A LOT more like Windows 7. The Control Panel is almost identical. System Properties and other dialogs are page for page. So you just get the kernel improvements.
    I think you will find that the Task Manager was to see a noticeable change with 8 as well as how MS simply decided to gut the works out of Windows 8 while 8.1 was people already having seen 8 stripped out and MS starting to flex a bit making 8.1 a more user friendly version. You also have to include the fact that not only was the option for seeing the desktop appear put back in but the mesh of two hardware platforms had also made some progress while 8 was an instant slam from desktop to "Something Else" as how most viewed it!

    And as for the Control Panel that hasn't seen any big change either! Don't forget you are now using the Start>Settings differently with 10 then you had been with 7. MS however has been considering doing away with the Control Panel entirely however which might come along with what comes later to follow 10 while 10 is supposed to be the last version?

    Jody Thornton said: View Post
    Some good points here. I would likely say that Windows 8.1 was what Windows 8 should be, except there should have been an update to natively include the Start Menu. It could have been defeated the same way that that Windows 10 allows a full Start Screen. The fact that Microsoft delayed that feature so that Windows 10 would include another "must-have" doesn't make Windows 8.1 a bad product.

    When Windows 8 came out, I HATED it. But when I started supporting Windows 8.1 on friend's systems, I really started to fall in love with it. (As a quick aside ... I was always "meh" about Windows 7. I actually hated how people snubbed Vista because of its bad RTM impression. SP2 fixed all of that, had a more conventional Start/Quick Launch/Taskbar that resembled the XP-style (I was never a fan of the new Windows 7 grouped taskbar, where I choose a thumbnail to select an app instance. (trust me, if you're recording on Audition and need to go click a script in WordPad, you want to just click that application taskbar box directly, and quickly.) but I grew to love Windows 8. It felt like a faster, flatter Windows 7. And I could just customize either taskbar to reflect Vista's.

    I recently moved over to Windows 8 myself. Yes I know it runs out of support this Tuesday, but I run a well-working HP xw8200 Workstation. And my processors won't support the x64 versions of Windows 8.1 or 10. But even though the Xeons I have are Netburst-style and old, it's still a brisk system. I am sure if I just keep updating Windows Defender defintions, and browse carefully, I'll be fine.

    I agree that too much effort was put into the RT builds and the poor-selling Surface. but if the Surface met a lower price point I would bite. There were some Asus tablets with Windows 8.1 and 10 and they look snazzy.
    No one is knocking 8.1 but rather sees it as 8 Second Edition to clean up after the First flopped! The delay as far the new Start menu serves a dual purpose of bring it back to make people happy for one while the more important opportunity MS grabbed up was updating and upgrading the Start menu to suit the needs of the dual platform OS 10 is actually realizing much better while 8.1 was progress over 8 there.

    As for the Quick Launch bar seen with both XP and Vista that actually stunk big time and was too limited only allowing so many items! More then simply grouping with the 7, 8, 8.1, 10 task bar you can do more then simply pin items but create new toolbars from folders on the drive where you can drag a ton of desktop shortcuts into and not see one left on the desktop eliminating all clutter there you would otherwise be stuck with on XP and Vista alike! A desktop full of icons and now you have a scenic wallpaper you can actually see not obstructed by numerous shortcuts. For many a working solution!

    If I considered carrying a tablet around it would need two usb ports and I would also need a usb dvd drive in addition to a small trackball type of mouse to carry along with me. I was just looking what I would use to replace my present cell phone that offers a limited text pad full of keys and an older model with a slide out type miniature keyboard but cramped tiny display while offering more keys compared to the all touchscreen models now being sold with onscreen keypads. Sometimes the latest or more recent simply doesn't do the job!
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 103
    32-bit Windows 10 Pro - Build 1607/14393.51
       14 Jan 2016 #147

    From Ed Bott's article:

    Anyone who writes about Windows and isn't aware of that should probably change careers or at least be honest about their sensational headlines. (Seriously, "Massive Windows 10 News Hides 5 Nasty Surprises" is an actual Forbes headline. I think it needs a few exclamation points, an OMG, and a poop emoji to be complete. Don't you?)
    That is not a stretch for Forbes' website.

    The venerable magazine's online home has become the most notorious click bait factory on the web.

    It's not just tech articles...they publish multi-page photo lists with inaccurate or unverified information about many other topics: "lists" of horrible or great cities, "lists" of restaurants, "lists" of just about anything they can put on 12 pages with a big advertisement on each page.

    I am not at all surprised that their "tech reporting" stinks.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  8. Posts : 3,361
    W10 Pro x64/W7 Ultimate x64 dual boot main - W10 Pro Insider Preview/W7 Pro x64 - remote pc
       14 Jan 2016 #148

    Yet some people rave on about how wonderful the Steve Forbes articles are depending what he is endorsing at the moment. But filling blog pages has nothing to do with the MS goals of "1 billion" machines running 10. They are already past the 20% mark in only 5 months time.
    (Like a friend just finding the option for 10 already checked off ready to go when checking for the latest updates on his 8.1 laptop still having the 10 app on at the moment.)
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  9. Posts : 493
    Windows 7/64 Professional
       15 Jan 2016 #149

    When one compares how many are using W-10 to other system means nothing to me. Let compare apples to apples.

    Other new issues of operating systems where measured by how many new operating system in a certain time span were sold compared to other new releases of operating systems.

    The line at the free candy store is always longer than the line at the pay for candy store.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  10. Posts : 3,361
    W10 Pro x64/W7 Ultimate x64 dual boot main - W10 Pro Insider Preview/W7 Pro x64 - remote pc
       15 Jan 2016 #150

    Isn't that always the case where once any new version is first out you have to get that can of WD40 to put a squelch on the squeaks until the OS is refined a bit. The one thing actually two things working in favor for 10 at the moment are 1) with the return of the Start menu Win 7 users can pick up where they left only in the newer updated note "dual platform" OS compared to what made 8 an instant fail back in '12!

    And 2) Win 8.1 users can also pick up where they leave off only seeing the newer more complete version of what they were already running in progression while with 7 you would be jumping to three versions newer. In the past if you perhaps skipped over two versions like 9x to XP or Vista if not ME/2000 to 7 you would feel the immediate impact as far as the differences in all aspects compared to how 10 carries on for both 7 and 8.1 in contrast to where 8 should have been before being pushed out.

    Yet despite the WMP being stripped and no Start menu with 8.1 or the new tiled up form seen with 10 the two main differences up front would be the UEFI factor seen over the last 5yrs. and the Hyper-V being a strong replacement for the old Virtual PC 2007 and XP Mode option primarily intended to get businesses to upgrade out of XP back then into 7.

    The other thing MS is looking at is how many are still hanging onto 7 since that was a working formula 6yrs. ago! and with 8 taking a nose dive people were waiting for more then 8.1 or "Windows 9" as that was thought to be the possible number and are now being drawn to look at 10 with the free upgrade offer of course while many have already dumped 10 like many dumped Vista to go back and a good number even dumped 7 to go back to Vista! Most of that however is either due to hesitance from unfamiliarity with how the new version will work as the usual case is as far as how things are seen with each new arrival. And then the largest factor that plays the most important part is simply "Personal Preferences"! if not simply a cost factor or software investment mainly an item businesses contend with a lot more.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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Source: Windows 10 Now on 75 Million Devices | Blogging Windows
http://www.neowin.net/news/after-53-million-installs-windows-10-takes-495-of-the-market?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter quite a good start :)
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