600 Millions PCs Waiting for Windows 10

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast

  1. Posts : 5,834
    Dual boot Windows 10 FCU Pro x 64 & current Insider 10 Pro
       #30

    What a junk site. Bogdan does a lot of speculating in his articles with referencing someone with no reference. Notice he states:

    "They're being extraordinarily responsive to customers," James pointed out, adding that approximately 600 million computers running Windows 10 could hit the market once the operating system becomes available.
    Well, hell could freeze over too, but I doubt it. Where do they come up with these numbers? That's what I want to know.
      My Computers

  2. whs's Avatar
    whs
    Posts : 1,935
    Windows 7
       #31

    strollin said:
    I believe many posting on this thread don't quite get what the article is saying. It's not talking about users that currently have Win 7 or Win 8 running on their machines doing an OS upgrade to Win 10. There's nothing in that for the manufacturers.

    It's referring to the people who have postponed upgrading to a NEW MACHINE because they didn't want a machine with Win 8 on it. According to the article, there's potentially 600 million machines in that category.

    Those of you that have existing machines that you plan to do an OS upgrade on to move from Win 7 or Win 8, aren't included in that number.
    Good point. However, will those 600M really go for a new PC with 10 if it has the same appearance as 8.1. I think right now many people are saying that there is little difference between 10 and 8.1 or even 7 in terms of function. This poor start menu which is really a camouflaged start screen (which I like better) is not going to convince people.

    As the old commercial said: " Where is the beef ". I would be looking for a lot more sexy new functions to make a convincing case. But maybe I just don't see those new functions.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 5,834
    Dual boot Windows 10 FCU Pro x 64 & current Insider 10 Pro
       #32

    whs said:
    I think right now many people are saying that there is little difference between 10 and 8.1 or even 7 in terms of function. This poor start menu which is really a camouflaged start screen (which I like better) is not going to convince people.

    As the old commercial said: " Where is the beef ". I would be looking for a lot more sexy new functions to make a convincing case. But maybe I just don't see those new functions.
    I think comparing it to 8.1 there is a big difference. This edition thus far is more desktop oriented as 8.1 is more Start Screen oriented “out of the box”. They made the mistake of forcing the Modern Start Screen onto users with 8, but tried correcting it with 8.1 to be able to configure to boot to desktop, although too late, for the damage done. “Out of the box” I guess is the key here. I guess that really matters.

    I agree about the Start Menu added in 10. That’s the biggest difference in the edition comparing it to 7. I think when those users disliking Modern apps understand that they can eliminate the Modern Store apps’ tiles in the right column and substitute “icon tiles” to link to those items in the 7 Start Menu, then I think they may accept the menu. For those of us that like the Modern, we can use the menu as is or configure to use the Start Screen.

    We shall see what Continuum brings, but I’m not liking Modern apps opening on the desktop, for it leaves me there when closing apps instead of returning to the Start Screen. Perhaps Continuum will change that. For now a simple WinKey gets me there. Not all that a big deal, but I’d rather have Start Screen orientation.

    Also, there are those that think MS should give up on the Modern altogether, but that isn’t going to happen. Too important business wise. Aero is another. They may bring it back, but I doubt it.
      My Computers

  4. Jody Thornton's Avatar
    Posts : 487
    Windows 8 Pro x64
       #33

    groze said:
    Radically different? Then why are a lot of people testing it now? Shouldn't people wait for the radically changes before testing any version?
    No. If in your case, you buy Windows 10 upon its RTM build being released next year, that will be a VERY different Windows 10 than the one you install an/or update to in 2023 (after 8x support runs out). Remember, it's VERY likely that Windows 10 will be the final full release of Windows as we know it. All OS changes form there on in will be delivered as an update (similarly to the build updates on the TP you've been getting). That's why Microsoft is testing that update mechanism. That is how new Windows "imporvements" or "builds will be sent. There won't be a Windows 11, 12, 13, or whatever. Windows 10 will be like OSX (ongoing for eternity)

    So next year's initial release will or may closely resemble what you get in the Consumer Preview come January. The Windows 10 build you update in several years from now, may be radically different.
      My Computer

  5. strollin's Avatar
    Posts : 771
    W10 Pro (desktop), W10 (laptop), W10Pro (tablet)
       #34

    whs said:
    strollin said:
    I believe many posting on this thread don't quite get what the article is saying. It's not talking about users that currently have Win 7 or Win 8 running on their machines doing an OS upgrade to Win 10. There's nothing in that for the manufacturers.

    It's referring to the people who have postponed upgrading to a NEW MACHINE because they didn't want a machine with Win 8 on it. According to the article, there's potentially 600 million machines in that category.

    Those of you that have existing machines that you plan to do an OS upgrade on to move from Win 7 or Win 8, aren't included in that number.
    Good point. However, will those 600M really go for a new PC with 10 if it has the same appearance as 8.1. I think right now many people are saying that there is little difference between 10 and 8.1 or even 7 in terms of function. This poor start menu which is really a camouflaged start screen (which I like better) is not going to convince people.

    As the old commercial said: " Where is the beef ". I would be looking for a lot more sexy new functions to make a convincing case. But maybe I just don't see those new functions.
    I didn't say I agreed with the 600 million PC number, I was just pointing out what the article is saying. The desktop PC I am typing this post on is running Win 7 and I have no reason to replace it anytime soon nor any desire to upgrade the OS to Win 10.

    I'll probably only have a machine running Win 10 if I build or buy a new one AFTER Win 10 is released. Until then, my Win 7 machines will continue to run Win 7 and my Win 8 machines will contiue to run Win 8.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 5,834
    Dual boot Windows 10 FCU Pro x 64 & current Insider 10 Pro
       #35

    Jody Thornton said:
    That's why Microsoft is testing that update mechanism. That is how new Windows "imporvements" or "builds will be sent. There won't be a Windows 11, 12, 13, or whatever. Windows 10 will be like OSX (ongoing for eternity)

    So next year's initial release will or may closely resemble what you get in the Consumer Preview come January. The Windows 10 build you update in several years from now, may be radically different.
    Did I miss something along the line? Was there an official statement of what you're stating from MS perhaps?

    While I'm at it. Some say that the kernel hasn't changed. Just the number. They're always adding to and improving it. e.g. Defender has been incorporated into the kernel.
      My Computers

  7. Jody Thornton's Avatar
    Posts : 487
    Windows 8 Pro x64
       #36

    HippsieGypsie said:
    Jody Thornton said:
    That's why Microsoft is testing that update mechanism. That is how new Windows "imporvements" or "builds will be sent. There won't be a Windows 11, 12, 13, or whatever. Windows 10 will be like OSX (ongoing for eternity)

    So next year's initial release will or may closely resemble what you get in the Consumer Preview come January. The Windows 10 build you update in several years from now, may be radically different.
    Did I miss something along the line? Was there an official statement of what you're stating from MS perhaps?

    While I'm at it. Some say that the kernel hasn't changed. Just the number. They're always adding to and improving it. e.g. Defender has been incorporated into the kernel.
    There have been several threads in this forum and respectable articles citing this is going to be Microsoft's path. That why I chuckle when someone says I'll wait this one out and try Windows 11 or 12. Uh, there won't be.
      My Computer



  8. Posts : 5,834
    Dual boot Windows 10 FCU Pro x 64 & current Insider 10 Pro
       #37

    Jody Thornton said:
    HippsieGypsie said:
    Jody Thornton said:
    That's why Microsoft is testing that update mechanism. That is how new Windows "imporvements" or "builds will be sent. There won't be a Windows 11, 12, 13, or whatever. Windows 10 will be like OSX (ongoing for eternity)

    So next year's initial release will or may closely resemble what you get in the Consumer Preview come January. The Windows 10 build you update in several years from now, may be radically different.
    Did I miss something along the line? Was there an official statement of what you're stating from MS perhaps?

    While I'm at it. Some say that the kernel hasn't changed. Just the number. They're always adding to and improving it. e.g. Defender has been incorporated into the kernel.
    There have been several threads in this forum and respectable articles citing this is going to be Microsoft's path. That why I chuckle when someone says I'll wait this one out and try Windows 11 or 12. Uh, there won't be.
    OK. So nothing set in stone yet. It'll be interesting to see what they do.

    If true, I wonder if one could get Windows 10 Build XXXX, skip Build YYYY, then get Build ZZZZ. Basically the same as one edition to another skipping an edition, or two, etc.
      My Computers

  9. whs's Avatar
    whs
    Posts : 1,935
    Windows 7
       #38

    Did I miss something along the line? Was there an official statement of what you're stating from MS perhaps?
    In an interview of the new MS CEO Satya Nadella I saw it did sound like they are going with that contineous update strategy. Unfortunately I lost the link to that interview.
      My Computer

  10. lehnerus2000's Avatar
    Posts : 1,808
    W7 Ultimate SP1 (64 bit), LM 19.2 MATE (64 bit), W10 Home 1703 (64 bit), W10 Pro 1703 (64 bit) VM
       #39

    Continuous


    whs said:
    Did I miss something along the line? Was there an official statement of what you're stating from MS perhaps?
    In an interview of the new MS CEO Satya Nadella I saw it did sound like they are going with that contineous update strategy. Unfortunately I lost the link to that interview.
    I've read that too.

    ...
    With Windows 10, the update approach is set to change substantially. Microsoft is acknowledging the need, and even desirability, of making regular incremental improvements to its operating system. It's also, however, acknowledging the different appetite for change between consumers and enterprise users.
    ...
    Ars Technia - Peter Bright
    Windows 10
      My Computer


 

Related Threads
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 18:41.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums