Windows Update expiration policy explained

    Windows Update expiration policy explained

    Windows Update expiration policy explained


    Microsoft produces two to three updates per supported Windows platform monthly. This results in a backlog of updates and potentially increases the size of update packages. Many of these updates, however, are cumulative and include all earlier updates that have been published for that platform. That means, when older packages expire, you still receive the updates contained in those packages by installing the cumulative update.

    By expiring older, redundant packages, you get better performance, shorter scan times, a faster user experience, and reduced risk of deploying older updates which have been superseded with newer, more secure ones. Here are answers to common questions we receive about our Windows update expiration policy.

    How often are update packages expired?

    Our published packages are evaluated for expiration on a regular basis. Once a large enough quantity of candidates have been found, an expiration will take place.

    Why aren't older updates expired?

    Some older packages may not yet have been evaluated or may not have met the criteria for expiration. It is also possible that they have not yet expired because of existing dependencies on that specific update.

    Are there any packages that cannot be expired?

    Security-only update packages for Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 SP2, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7 SP1, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008 SP2 do not expire as they are not cumulative and hold only one month worth of fixes. Additionally, if a more recent update package has a dependency on an older package, the older package will not expire until it has been superseded by a newer package.

    How can find out if my update has expired?

    If an update has expired, you will see the word "EXPIRED" appended to the title of the release note article associated with that specific update on support.microsoft.com.



    There will also be an expiration notice at the top of the article.



    If you are using Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), you will see a banner at the top of the details pane if a given update has expired.

    Note: This policy only applies to Windows updates. Updates for other Microsoft software or firmware may have different policies and should be considered separately.



    Source: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/...d/ba-p/2860928
    Brink's Avatar Posted By:

  1. desbest's Avatar
    Posts : 155
    Windows 10
       #1

    This is just corporate greed and planned obsolescence.

    It's just like when Apple made the older iphone models slow down to encourage them into buying a newer iphone model and newer operating system.

    So if I buy my computer and get performance, security and bug fixes in year A from a free windows update, Microsoft will remove my ability to download those windows updates in year B, just so I upgrade to the latest software and give Microsoft more money and more of my personal data from their mandatory telemetry and adverts on the login screen and start menu that I cannot turn off.

    People have been complaining about renting software and digital media for years. You can't buy windows and other software to have it in your own possession, now you must RENT it and it's non-transferable.

    It's just like how you can't copy ebooks from a Kindle onto your computer so Amazon can in theory remote wipe any ebook from your device which has happened before when they remote wiped the book 1984. Or how Adobe software has a monthly subscription. They're doing it with video games where you can't download a zip file, or purchase a physical DVD or blu-ray of a video game.

    They mention Windows but I think that's a pretext and that their real end goal is Microsoft Office. They don't like how people are using the old versions of Office and not upgrading their Office version every 5 years for pointless, gimmicky and frivolous features. So they're going to remove all the updates for Office and intentionally make it buggy, crippleware and crash.
    Last edited by desbest; 20 Oct 2021 at 12:49.
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  2. Rahulji's Avatar
    Posts : 17
    Windows 10
       #2

    desbest said:
    This is just corporate greed and planned obsolescence. ...
    Indeed, indeed.
      My Computer

  3. sygnus21's Avatar
    Posts : 5,686
    Win 10 Pro (x64) 21H1 (19043.1023
       #3

    I'm sorry, but did you guys actually read the article? It's talking about expiring Windows Updates...

    Note: This policy only applies to Windows updates.
    I don't see how that equates to Microsoft being greedy

    As to software possession, if you actually read a EULA (End User License Agreement) you'd realize you're buying a "license" to use the software, not "ownership" of said software. That when you clicked the "yes, I agree" box in order for the install to proceed, you agreed to the EULA terms. If you didn't the software wouldn't have installed.

    And the physical possession of software does not mean actual ownership as outlined in the EULA agreement.

    Peace
      My Computers

  4. desbest's Avatar
    Posts : 155
    Windows 10
       #4

    sygnus21 said:
    I'm sorry, but did you guys actually read the article? It's talking about expiring Windows Updates...


    I don't see how that equates to Microsoft being greedy

    As to software possession, if you actually read a EULA (End User License Agreement) you'd realize you're buying a "license" to use the software, not "ownership" of said software.

    Does Windows 7 or Windows 8 provide a Service Pack 1 or 2 through Windows Update which provides a bunch of performance, security and bug fixes, and then years later delete the update from their servers so you can no longer download it?

    ...........

    No.

    Windows 10 is.
      My Computer

  5. NMI's Avatar
    NMI
    Posts : 872
    Windows 10 Pro, Version 20H2
       #5

    desbest said:
    Does Windows 7 or Windows 8 provide a Service Pack 1 or 2 through Windows Update which provides a bunch of performance, security and bug fixes, and then years later delete the update from their servers so you can no longer download it?

    ...........

    No.

    Windows 10 is.
    Cumulative vs. not cumulative is explained in the article.
      My Computer

  6. desbest's Avatar
    Posts : 155
    Windows 10
       #6

    NMI said:
    Cumulative vs. not cumulative is explained in the article.
    You are assuming that the user is using the latest version of Windows 10. Not everyone is using Windows 10 21H1.

    If a person is using Windows 10 1903 in 2019 and they decide to not turn on their computer for 5 years, when they actually turn it on again in 2024 and open up Windows Update, they won't be able to install any further Windows Updates that are cumulative updates because they all would have expired, ahem microsoft, been deleted.

    So they would either be stuck with crippleware by design, or they would be forced to upgrade to Windows 10 21H1.
      My Computer


  7. NMI's Avatar
    NMI
    Posts : 872
    Windows 10 Pro, Version 20H2
       #7

    desbest said:
    If a person is using Windows 10 1903 in 2019 and they decide to not turn on their computer for 5 years, when they actually turn it on again in 2024 and open up Windows Update, they won't be able to install any further Windows Updates that are cumulative updates because they all would have expired, ahem microsoft, been deleted.

    So they would either be stuck with crippleware by design, or they would be forced to upgrade to Windows 10 21H1.
    What's wrong with that in those circumstances?

    Updates for each version are only released for the first 18 months.

    We all agreed to automatic updates/upgrades when we started using Windows 10.
      My Computer

  8. Bree's Avatar
    Posts : 21,939
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #8

    desbest said:
    If a person is using Windows 10 1903 in 2019 and they decide to not turn on their computer for 5 years, when they actually turn it on again in 2024 and open up Windows Update, they won't be able to install any further Windows Updates that are cumulative updates because they all would have expired, ahem microsoft, been deleted...

    Not entirely true. Only the superseded updated have been expired.

    Microsoft said:
    Many of these updates, however, are cumulative and include all earlier updates that have been published for that platform. That means, when older packages expire, you still receive the updates contained in those packages by installing the cumulative update.
    For 1903, which reached end of support on Dec 8th 2020, a more recent CU than the expired KB4540673 from March 2020 shown above is still available from WU and the catalog.

    November 19, 2020—KB4586819 (OS Builds 18362.1237 and 18363.1237) Preview

    Update Catalog | Windows 10 version 1903 KB4586819
      My Computers


 

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