KB5001330 CU Windows 10 v2004 build 19041.928 and v20H2 19042.928 Win Update

Page 25 of 32 FirstFirst ... 152324252627 ... LastLast

  1. Posts : 46,620
    Windows 10 Home 64bit 21H1 and insider builds
       #240

    Sounds like a good idea to me, especially as MS's update quality is pants.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 77
    Win 10 Pro
       #241

    SM03 said:
    March'21 & April'21 LCU both are bugged for choppy gaming performance & Framerates, any gamer here using the latest KB5001391 (v1904x.962) beta LCU, can confirm whether that bug is fixed in this or not?

    Also, MSFT recently shared a server-side fix for 1904x.928 for the bug related gaming performance, the detailed article is here. Can anyone confirm this too?
    I am on this build and my PC is predominantly for gaming. Running RTX3080 on latest driver 466.11 (always do full DDU driver removal in safe mode), FPS is normal in all games I play - Destiny 2, Sea of Thieves etc. I don't play COD MW very much, but I can test if you like. Performance also fine in VR (I mainly do racing Simulations). Not sure if they fixed the SteamVR bug, since I only launch afterburner on first boot of PC then it is closed with task scheduler. RTX 30 series seem to be able to store both fan curve and clock profile in memory once applied and don't need AB to be open once applied on system 1st boot.

    Guys, sorry this is 'off topic', just trying to help
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 29
    Windows 10
       #242

    steve108 said:
    For newbies like me

    "...But unlike in the past with a hotfix, Microsoft now also works with the Known Issue Rollback (KIR) function. This means that an error can be fixed without an update....We have been using Known Issue Rollback since late 2019 to include non-security fixes. Today, around 80% of the fixes that ship on Windows 10 Version 2004 (and later versions) are contained with Known Issue Rollback."

    etc.
    etc.
    etc.
    "In the long term, the cost of surrendering your privacy usually outweighs the benefit."

    Known Issue Rollback was designed as a fast, less disruptive alternative [to Windows Updates]. Microsoft notes that about 80% of all fixes for Windows 10 version 2004 or later include Known Issue Rollback functionality already. The feature is only used with non-security fixes. Microsoft explains that updates retain the code when Known Issue Rollback is being used, and since it is "typically more vulnerable or exploitable", the feature is not used with security fixes currently."

    So we already know it is vulnerable and exploitable! How long do you think it's going to take for someone to figure out how to exploit KIR to distribute malware?
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 21,424
    19044.1586 - 21H2 Pro x64
       #243

    I'll leave that up to the security experts to test and report.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 329
    Windows 10
       #244

    I do not have those entries, 0, 15, 4 are all empty (latest DEV)
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 29
    Windows 10
       #245

    steve108 said:
    I'll leave that up to the security experts to test and report.
    I'm not going to lose sleep over it, but I will share my experience with Known Issue Rollback (KIR) with you for now.

    I deploy Windows Update Blocker (WUP) to toggle Windows Update on and off. I turn off Windows Update (WU) most of the time. So when you run Windows Update Blocker, it keeps the WU service turned off, even when you reboot.

    I have a PC that I recently updated to Windows 10 19042.928. Then I turned off Windows Update, and I disconnected the PC from the internet. A few days later, I booted it up while still being disconnected from the internet. I took a screen shot of the part of registry that is affected by the KIR. The PC was untouched by the KIR.

    Then I reconnected the ethernet cable to the PC while it was running and rebooted. This time it had booted while being connected to the internet, but Windows Update service was still turned off (disabled).

    To my surprise, the following regkeys were added while Windows Update service was disabled.
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FeatureManagement\Overrides\4\1837593227
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FeatureManagement\Overrides\4\194121355
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FeatureManagement\Overrides\4\4071209099

    My conclusion is that KIR uses a different channel than Windows Update to make changes to the registry.
    Windows Update service is still turned off!

    We know that Windows 10 has other channels for communicating with MSFT. Activation and Windows 10 Lockscreen download are examples. But I was left a bit uncomfortable to see that my registry could be altered while Windows Update was turned off. I didn't even know when the changes had been made to the registry by the KIR.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 21,424
    19044.1586 - 21H2 Pro x64
       #246

    Maverik said:
    I'm not going to lose sleep over it, but I will share my experience with Known Issue Rollback (KIR) with you for now.

    I deploy Windows Update Blocker (WUP) to toggle Windows Update on and off. I turn off Windows Update (WU) most of the time. So when you run Windows Update Blocker, it keeps the WU service turned off, even when you reboot.

    I have a PC that I recently updated to Windows 10 19042.928. Then I turned off Windows Update, and I disconnected the PC from the internet. A few days later, I booted it up while still being disconnected from the internet. I took a screen shot of the part of registry that is affected by the KIR. The PC was untouched by the KIR.

    Then I reconnected the ethernet cable to the PC while it was running and rebooted. This time it had booted while being connected to the internet, but Windows Update service was still turned off (disabled).

    To my surprise, the following regkeys were added while Windows Update service was disabled.
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FeatureManagement\Overrides\4\1837593227
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FeatureManagement\Overrides\4\194121355
    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FeatureManagement\Overrides\4\4071209099

    My conclusion is that KIR uses a different channel than Windows Update to make changes to the registry.
    Windows Update service is still turned off!

    We know that Windows 10 has other channels for communicating with MSFT. Activation and Windows 10 Lockscreen download are examples. But I was left a bit uncomfortable to see that my registry could be altered while Windows Update was turned off. I didn't even know when the changes had been made to the registry by the KIR.
    Thanks for sharing.

    I'm not into the blocking everything MEGAsoft does to my PC game to the degree some people here are like blocking telemetry ( I did select minimal telemetry).

    I have started disabling WU for 35 days so I can do CU updates once a month when convenient for me. KIR updates which hopefully improve my PC stability and Defender signature updates are fine with me.

    There's probably someone here that can tell you how to block KIR updates. For now I'm not going to worry them either until I see reports saying I should.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 2,557
    Windows 10 pro x64-bit
       #247

    steve108 said:
    Thanks for sharing.

    I'm not into the blocking everything MEGAsoft does to my PC game to the degree some people here are like blocking telemetry ( I did select minimal telemetry).

    I have started disabling WU for 35 days so I can do CU updates once a month when convenient for me. KIR updates which hopefully improve my PC stability and Defender signature updates are fine with me.

    There's probably someone here that can tell you how to block KIR updates. For now I'm not going to worry them either until I see reports saying I should.
    I have to agree fully with you even though KIR comes at the cost of Telemetry, but all things considered, I prefer having my PC running in a stable manner and protected. Even when one tries to disable Telemetry with third-party apps, MS still knows what they have to know unless one is comfortable with breaking the machine and renders it unusable.

    Then again, the Windows OS pertains to MS and there is no way to circumvent that. The machine belongs to the user and it is also his/her right to brick it. Fair game!
    Last edited by IronZorg89; 26 Apr 2021 at 15:33.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 29
    Windows 10
       #248

    IronZorg89 said:
    I have to agree fully with you even though KIR comes at the cost of Telemetry, but all things considered, I prefer having my PC running in a stable manner and protected. Even when one tries to disable Telemetry with third-party apps, MS still knows what they have to know unless one is comfortable with breaking the machine and renders it unusable.

    Then again, the Windows OS pertains to MS and there is no way to circumvent that. The machine belongs to the user and it is also his/her right to brick it. Fair game!
    I have no immediate plans to mess with Windows 10 telemetry. Every time I target telemetry settings, they get reset with incoming updates and in-place upgrades.

    I'm suspicious that the Update Orchestrator Service is being reset when I reboot, and thus enabling a path for the KIR. This has been known to happen.

    The only way to circumvent the Windows OS is to run a variant of Unix (i.e. Linux). But that's probably not considered circumventing.

    I'm not sure there is such a thing as privacy anymore unless you want to live in a cabin somewhere and stay off the grid.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 2,557
    Windows 10 pro x64-bit
       #249

    Maverik said:
    I have no immediate plans to mess with Windows 10 telemetry. Every time I target telemetry settings, they get reset with incoming updates and in-place upgrades.

    I'm suspicious that the Update Orchestrator Service is being reset when I reboot, and thus enabling a path for the KIR. This has been known to happen.

    The only way to circumvent the Windows OS is to run a variant of Unix (i.e. Linux). But that's probably not considered circumventing.

    I'm not sure there is such a thing as privacy anymore unless you want to live in a cabin somewhere and stay off the grid.
    You said it all and I couldn't have said it any better. And you are certainly on the same track as I am with regard to Privacy. Does it exist anymore with the digital world we are living in right now?. That doesn't mean we have to lower our guard when it comes to phishing, hackers, using our credit cards on line and so on... I am very vigilant and cagey with anything suspicious whenever I am using my machines.
      My Computers


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 21:32.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums