Current Status of Windows 10 October 2018 Update version 1809


  1. Posts : 165
    Win 10 x64 Home
       #830

    Well my Surface 3 finally got 1809 after manually clicking get updates but my desktop still doesn't see it.
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  2. CountMike's Avatar
    Posts : 18,455
    W10+Developer Insider + Linux
       #831

    Wynona said:
    Ddelo, I'm pretty sure the countdown starts on the day you defer updates, since I've done it before, and never had any unexpected updates.

    So, not to prove who's right or wrong, but because I want to be sure of what I'm doing the next time I defer, I'm gonna ask those far smarter than I am about this stuff . . . When does the countdown actually start when deferring updates?

    Does it start from the time the Build is released or does it start on the actual day updates are deferred?
    I don't want to sound like Spock but it would be logical to starts the second you press that button.
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  3. AndreTen's Avatar
    Posts : 23,654
    Windows 10 (Pro and Insider Pro)
       #832

    CountMike said:
    I don't want to sound like Spock but it would be logical to starts the second you press that button.
    Logic is undeniable for start. But when does it ends? And don't bring Spock in this, it's MS!
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  4. Posts : 165
    Win 10 x64 Home
       #833

    Is there a way to un-defer since the option is no longer in Settings?
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  5. f14tomcat's Avatar
    Posts : 53,634
    Multi-boot Windows 10 - RTM, RP, Beta, and Insider
       #834

    elbeasto said:
    Is there a way to un-defer since the option is no longer in Settings?
    Not totally clear on your question, but on 1809, as on 1803, it is still there. Just set it to 0.

    Current Status of Windows 10 October 2018 Update version 1809-2018-12-14_19h03_20.png
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  6. Wynona's Avatar
    Posts : 28,126
    Windows 10 20H2 Build 19042.928
       #835

    elbeasto said:
    Is there a way to un-defer since the option is no longer in Settings?
    Yes; once you defer, a "Resume Updates" button appears.
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  7. ddelo's Avatar
    Posts : 2,255
    Windows 10 Pro x64
       #836

    Wynona said:
    Ddelo, I'm pretty sure the countdown starts on the day you defer updates, since I've done it before, and never had any unexpected updates.

    So, not to prove who's right or wrong, but because I want to be sure of what I'm doing the next time I defer, I'm gonna ask those far smarter than I am about this stuff . . . When does the countdown actually start when deferring updates?

    Does it start from the time the Build is released or does it start on the actual day updates are deferred?
    CountMike said:
    I don't want to sound like Spock but it would be logical to starts the second you press that button.
    Looking around I found this article, by Ed Bott in ZDNet

    QUOTE:
    "Go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update, and then click Advanced options to see all three settings, which I have labeled in the screenshot on this page.

    Option 1 allows you to choose a servicing channel (previously called a branch). The default setting is Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted), which corresponds to what was previously known as the Current Branch.

    You can change this setting to Semi-Annual Channel (the new name for what was previously known as Current Branch for Business, as shown here. That defers feature updates until Microsoft declares them "ready for business deployment." For version 1803, that declaration happened uncharacteristically quickly, a mere two months after the initial release.

    Option 2 allows you to specify additional time after the official release to the channel you selected. You can delay the upgrade by up to an additional 365 days from its initial release date; in the example shown here, I've chosen a 90-day delay, which means that the 1809 feature update will not be offered to this PC until at least January 2019.

    On any PC where you choose the full 365-day deferral and have opted in to the Semi-Annual Channel, you'll be spared any feature updates until sometime in late 2019 or early 2020. (Here, too, this option is available only on PCs running business and education versions of Windows 10.)

    Option 3 works independently of the feature update settings and allows you to defer the monthly cumulative security updates and any additional out-of-band updates by up to 30 days. In this example I have chosen to delay these updates by 7 days to allow time for testing.
    "

    So I think the verdict is, that the countdown starts from the Feature update release date and not the date the user decides to start the deferral.

    Last night was exactly 30 days from the re-release date (Nov. 13), that's why my 30 days deferral expired and so I was "missing" important updates!
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  8. f14tomcat's Avatar
    Posts : 53,634
    Multi-boot Windows 10 - RTM, RP, Beta, and Insider
       #837

    ddelo said:
    Looking around I found this article, by Ed Bott in ZDNet

    QUOTE:
    "Go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update, and then click Advanced options to see all three settings, which I have labeled in the screenshot on this page.

    Option 1 allows you to choose a servicing channel (previously called a branch). The default setting is Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted), which corresponds to what was previously known as the Current Branch.

    You can change this setting to Semi-Annual Channel (the new name for what was previously known as Current Branch for Business, as shown here. That defers feature updates until Microsoft declares them "ready for business deployment." For version 1803, that declaration happened uncharacteristically quickly, a mere two months after the initial release.

    Option 2 allows you to specify additional time after the official release to the channel you selected. You can delay the upgrade by up to an additional 365 days from its initial release date; in the example shown here, I've chosen a 90-day delay, which means that the 1809 feature update will not be offered to this PC until at least January 2019.

    On any PC where you choose the full 365-day deferral and have opted in to the Semi-Annual Channel, you'll be spared any feature updates until sometime in late 2019 or early 2020. (Here, too, this option is available only on PCs running business and education versions of Windows 10.)

    Option 3 works independently of the feature update settings and allows you to defer the monthly cumulative security updates and any additional out-of-band updates by up to 30 days. In this example I have chosen to delay these updates by 7 days to allow time for testing.
    "

    So I think the verdict is, that the countdown starts from the Feature update release date and not the date the user decides to start the deferral.
    FWIW - Agree.
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  9. ddelo's Avatar
    Posts : 2,255
    Windows 10 Pro x64
       #838

    Since Ed Bott and Dick have the same opinion, I believe that the case is closed.
    Thanks Dick!
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  10. f14tomcat's Avatar
    Posts : 53,634
    Multi-boot Windows 10 - RTM, RP, Beta, and Insider
       #839

    ddelo said:
    Since Ed Bott and Dick have the same opinion, I believe that the case is closed.
    Thanks Dick!
    Hardly in the same class.
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