Windows 10: Facebook Cracking Down on Platform Abuse


  1. Posts : 30,631
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro build 17713
       21 Mar 2018 #1

    Facebook Cracking Down on Platform Abuse


    Protecting people’s information is the most important thing we do at Facebook. What happened with Cambridge Analytica was a breach of Facebook’s trust. More importantly, it was a breach of the trust people place in Facebook to protect their data when they share it. As Mark Zuckerberg explained in his post, we are announcing some important steps for the future of our platform. These steps involve taking action on potential past abuse and putting stronger protections in place to prevent future abuse.



    People use Facebook to connect with friends and others using all kinds of apps. Facebook’s platform helped make apps social — so your calendar could show your friends’ birthdays, for instance. To do this, we allowed people to log into apps and share who their friends were and some information about them.

    As people used the Facebook platform in new ways, we strengthened the rules. We required that developers get people’s permission before they access the data needed to run their apps – for instance, a photo sharing app has to get specific permission from you to access your photos. Over the years we’ve introduced more guardrails, including in 2014, when we began reviewing apps that request certain data before they could launch, and introducing more granular controls for people to decide what information to share with apps. These actions would prevent any app like Aleksandr Kogan’s from being able to access so much data today.

    Even with these changes, we’ve seen abuse of our platform and the misuse of people’s data, and we know we need to do more. We have a responsibility to everyone who uses Facebook to make sure their privacy is protected. That’s why we’re making changes to prevent abuse. We’re going to set a higher standard for how developers build on Facebook, what people should expect from them, and, most importantly, from us. We will:

    1. Review our platform. We will investigate all apps that had access to large amounts of information before we changed our platform in 2014 to reduce data access, and we will conduct a full audit of any app with suspicious activity. If we find developers that misused personally identifiable information, we will ban them from our platform.
    2. Tell people about data misuse. We will tell people affected by apps that have misused their data. This includes building a way for people to know if their data might have been accessed via “thisisyourdigitallife.” Moving forward, if we remove an app for misusing data, we will tell everyone who used it.
    3. Turn off access for unused apps. If someone hasn’t used an app within the last three months, we will turn off the app’s access to their information.
    4. Restrict Facebook Login data. We are changing Login, so that in the next version, we will reduce the data that an app can request without app review to include only name, profile photo and email address. Requesting any other data will require our approval.
    5. Encourage people to manage the apps they use. We already show people what apps their accounts are connected to and control what data they’ve permitted those apps to use. Going forward, we’re going to make these choices more prominent and easier to manage.
    6. Reward people who find vulnerabilities. In the coming weeks we will expand Facebook’s bug bounty program so that people can also report to us if they find misuses of data by app developers.

    There’s more work to do, and we’ll be sharing details in the coming weeks about additional steps we’re taking to put people more in control of their data. Some of these updates were already in the works, and some are related to new data protection laws coming into effect in the EU. This week’s events have accelerated our efforts, and these changes will be the first of many we plan to roll out to protect people’s information and make our platform safer.


    Source: Cracking Down on Platform Abuse | Facebook Newsroom

    See also: Hard Questions: Update on Cambridge Analytica | Facebook Newsroom
    Last edited by Brink; 22 Mar 2018 at 15:19.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  2.    22 Mar 2018 #1

    We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you.

    Well, you didn't and no, you don't...

    It's hard to protect Facebook users' data, when Facebook have confidential legal binding agreements with commercial and academic entities for accessing users' data. So do tell, how is Facebook planning to remove and/or bring back users' data from these entities?

    Cambridge Analytica (CA) is just one of the many commercial entities that had access to Facebook platform. It's probably safe to say that, while the agreement with CA has been terminated, other commercial and academia entities' agreements will stay in place.

    Quote from the Forbes article:

    However, whether or not the allegations are true (the company has denied them), the singular focus on Cambridge Analytica makes for a simple meme-worthy media narrative, but the reality is that what the company stands accused of by Facebook is in fact what academic researchers, commercial enterprises, governments and even the social media companies themselves do every day with the data entrusted to them by a quarter of the earth’s population
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 132
    Windows 10 Home 64bit V1709
       22 Mar 2018 #2

    Too late Facebook...
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  4. Posts : 94
    Win 10 Pro 64x 1803 17348
       22 Mar 2018 #3

    galaxys said: View Post
    Too late Facebook...
    Facebook, too big and too powerful, along with every other social media company. All of them need to be rained in and made to abide by the law. Facebook gets away with paying a pittance in tax in the UK compared to what they earn.
    Never used them and will never use them.
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  5.    22 Mar 2018 #4

    We, the people, simply do not understand what are the implication of big data harvesting, AI processing, all data collection; we simply can not compete with the power of data servers, ever changing configuration, option, rules, legalese agreements, our governors should protect us but they are not in power anymore.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    23 Mar 2018 #5

    no1yak said: View Post
    Facebook, too big and too powerful, along with every other social media company. All of them need to be rained in and made to abide by the law. Facebook gets away with paying a pittance in tax in the UK compared to what they earn.
    Never used them and will never use them.

    Not using Facebook does not meant that Facebook doesn't collect data about you, at least as long as you browse the internet:

    Facebook will now track you even if you BGR

    Yesteryear, it used to be, "with free services, you are the product". Even that is not true anymore.

    With "telemetry" built-in to most, if not all software including the paid for ones, there's no escape from data brokers building a profile about you. It's been at least couple of years that data brokers add off line data for you, collected from public and paid for records. Intelligence agencies love to have access to the social networks, data brokers, etc., hence the reason governments offer only lip service about privacy...
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    23 Mar 2018 #6

    Facebook isn't the only program that tracks what you are doing. When I start up an internet explorer, like Microsoft Edge, I immediately see targeted advertisements from websites that I visited. I don't mind seeing ads but I think this type of targeting advertising goes too far.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8.    23 Mar 2018 #7

    alkaufmann said: View Post
    Facebook isn't the only program that tracks what you are doing. When I start up an internet explorer, like Microsoft Edge, I immediately see targeted advertisements from websites that I visited. I don't mind seeing ads but I think this type of targeting advertising goes too far.

    Even if I don't see ads at the the the browser start, I do agree... It's not just Facebook that's doing it, pretty much everybody from A-Z, including Microsoft.

    And in all fairness, Microsoft is rather late to this party, but boy, did they catch up in a hurry....
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 

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