Kernel memory leaking Intel processor design flaw

Page 9 of 14 FirstFirst ... 7891011 ... LastLast

  1. Posts : 803
    Windows 10 Enterprise x64 19044.1737
       #80

    dwarfer66 said:
    According to the intel detection tool, my ivy bridge i5-3550 is fine.
    Hi @dwarfer66

    The Intel detection tool is for the Intel ME issue.

    Flaws found in Intel Management Engine (ME), TXE and SPS
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1,191
    Windows 11 Pro x64
       #81

    Faith said:
    Who said anything about BIOS updates? I'm talking about intel driver updates, which WU is more than capable of delivering. And if BIOS updates are needed aswell then a large amount of users will have their PC's vulnerable.
    What "Intel drivers" would those be?
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 1,191
    Windows 11 Pro x64
       #82

    Polo6RGTI said:
    Hi @dwarfer66

    The Intel detection tool is for the Intel ME issue.

    Flaws found in Intel Management Engine (ME), TXE and SPS
    Yeah, nothing to do with this, but another black mark against Intel.
      My Computers


  4. Posts : 345
    Windows 10
       #83

    I wonder if this mess will lead to Intel resurrecting the IA-64 architecture.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 80
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit
       #84

    Asus have released new bios update, for my motherboard H110M-D.

    Kernel memory leaking Intel processor design flaw-cpu-microcode-update.png
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 5,478
    2004
       #85

    Ground Sloth said:
    I wonder if this mess will lead to Intel resurrecting the IA-64 architecture.
    Of course not - we'll all be running POWER 9

    Enough of these low power cheap as chips, er, chips. Lets have some decent 350MW ones!
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 1,561
    Windows 10 Home 20H2 64-bit
       #86

    Geneo said:
    What "Intel drivers" would those be?
    I mean the chipset and ME driver primarily, if they are vulnerable that is. But it doesn't matter because I contacted both Intel and MSI this morning and both told me that a "microcode" update is required to be "fully" secured, so a BIOS update is indeed needed on top of the KB update from Microsoft. This creates a very concerned future because updating the BIOS aren't something normal PC users do often, or at all. I can also see that not even half of the PC's I use have gotten a BIOS update through the board manufacturer. And OEM's that's more than 5 years old probably won't even get a BIOS update.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 2,292
    Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)
       #87

    What if a user doesnt update their BIOS. Most wouldnt Id imagine. I mean most of my family no nothing of a BIOS and trust windows update. Id wager this goes for majority of windows users

    intel and MS needs a better solution than relying on people to update a BIOS ontop of windows update
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 1,561
    Windows 10 Home 20H2 64-bit
       #88

    Scottyboy99 said:
    What if a user doesn’t update their BIOS. Most wouldn’t I’d imagine. I mean most of my family no nothing of a BIOS and trust windows update. I’d wager this goes for majority of windows users
    That's what I mean. I don't know how severe this bug is without a microcode update, but the KB from Microsoft will do 'something' to bandage the flaws of course. The point is that to be "fully" (putting quotation around it) secured you need all of them, not just one.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 25,646
    Windows 11 Pro 22000.708
       #89

    There’s no evidence that bad actors have yet exploited the bugs, but companies from Microsoft to Mozilla said this week they have worked to patch up vulnerabilities to their operating systems and browsers to protect against one of the bugs. Researchers say the other is harder to fix and “will haunt us for quite some time.”
    Here’s a look at what’s affected, what’s being done about it and whether you should worry.
    ___
    INTEL INSIDE

    Intel is at the center of the problem because it supplies the processors used in many of the world’s PCs. Researchers say one of the bugs, called Meltdown, affects nearly every processor it’s made since the mid-1990s.

    While security flaws are typically limited to a specific company or product, Intel says the problem is “not a bug or a flaw in Intel products” but rather a broader problem affecting processing techniques common to modern computing platforms.
    Both the chipmaker and Google, which informed Intel about the vulnerability in June, said they were planning to disclose the issue next week when fixes will be available. Tech companies typically withhold details about security problems until fixes are available so that hackers wouldn’t have a roadmap to exploit the flaws. But in this case, Intel was forced to disclose the problem Wednesday after British technology site The Register reported it, causing Intel’s stock to fall.
    Most of the immediate fixes will be limited to the Meltdown bug. The other, Spectre, is harder to fix, but also harder to exploit, making it less of an immediate threat to consumer devices.

    Source AP and Intel
      My Computer


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 16:31.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums