Vmware or virtualbox?

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  1. Posts : 342
    Windows 10
       #11

    I discovered by accident that if you have Hyper-V enabled Virtual Toolbox of VMplayer don't work. I attempted VTB and the list of option of OS's of the VM machine only showed 32 bit choices. I attempted to install the 32 bit Technical Preview and got an error. When I tried to use VMplayer it gave me an error something like can't use if Hyper-V VM exists. So I decided to use Hyper-V which i installed and no wireless but I googled and found out I have to create A virtual switch and select the wireless card. That worked fine the the VM got corrupt and I tried to reinstall the VM and I had to set the virtual switch again but I could get it to work. SO I went back to VMplayer. I read the error again and I though maybe if i disable Hyper-V it will work. I disabled Hyper-V in windows and when went to Virtual toolbox it showed 64 bit and 32 bit in the dropdown. I installed but it would let me go above 1600 by 900. So then I decided to try VMPlayer and it's working fine. I've added all the new builds with no problems.

    Then my laptop broke and I sent it back to repair so I replaced my Windows 7 boot SSD with an older and smaller SSD and I installed The technical preview build 9926 and it's working fine.

    SO my choice is VMPlayer as everything runs well except my camera.
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  2. whs's Avatar
    whs
    Posts : 1,935
    Windows 7
       #12

    I used vBox for years but there were always little gremlins. Now I use VMware Player which works very well for me. Only the printing from a Linux distro is a problem. That may be a driver problem though.
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  3. Kesto's Avatar
    Posts : 86
    Windows 10 Home x64
    Thread Starter
       #13

    Kari said:
    BS. Please tell me one thing possible with VMware but not possible with Hyper-V



    Kari
    Well you can take snapshots and share VMs, you can also pause the state of your vm instead of having to start ALL over again.
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  4. Posts : 803
    10 Pro Preview x64
       #14

    Kesto said:
    Well you can take snapshots and share VMs, you can also pause the state of your vm instead of having to start ALL over again.
    You can do all of this with Hyper-V. One advantage Hyper-V has over VBox and VMWare (non server) is it automatically suspends and restarts VMs when you reboot.
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  5. whs's Avatar
    whs
    Posts : 1,935
    Windows 7
       #15

    I am not a Hyper-V expert. I use VMware Player and run all my virtual systems from an external device (SSD of fast USB stick). That way I can run the virtual systems of which I have about a dozen on every system that has VMware Player installed - even Linux systems or an old Vista laptop from 2007. Is that something I could do with Hyper-V ??
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  6. Kari's Avatar
    Posts : 17,434
    Windows 10 Pro
       #16

    whs said:
    I am not a Hyper-V expert. I use VMware Player and run all my virtual systems from an external device (SSD of fast USB stick). That way I can run the virtual systems of which I have about a dozen on every system that has VMware Player installed - even Linux systems or an old Vista laptop from 2007. Is that something I could do with Hyper-V ??
    Of course in this sense Hyper-V is not as flexible because it only runs on Windows 8 & 8.1 Pro, Windows 10 and Windows Server 2008 and 2012 versions of Windows. It's not possible to run Hyper-V on Linux or legacy Windows (Seven and older).

    To compensate that, it's incredibly easy to run Hyper-V virtual machines on your home network. They only need to be located on one computer, you can then connect to any vm on any virtual host (PC) on your network with Virtual Machine Connection tool:

    Vmware or virtualbox?-2015-02-21_20h04_01.png

    This simply means that you don't have to connect the HDD or SSD containing your virtual machines to the computer you are currently using. Instead, if for example the PC-1 in your network contains the virtual machines, you can connect to them and use them from PC-2.

    If you store your virtual machines on an external media, you can also create a new vm on any computer using existing vm on that media.

    Personally I do not even need my virtual machines to go with me. I have set up port forwarding to forward incoming remote desktop connection requests to my home server (see RDC tutorial, Part Eight) which is always up and running. This way I can connect to and use my Hyper-V virtual machines from any Windows, Windows Phone, Linux, Android, iOS and MacOSX device out there (tutorial), without need to carry the media containing them with me.

    Here I am connected to my laptop running Windows 10 Build 9926 using RDC from Windows Phone. As laptop has some virtual machines I have opened a Win 10 Build 9879 vm and am controlling it from the phone:

    Vmware or virtualbox?-wp_ss_20150221_0002.jpg

    Kari
    Last edited by Kari; 21 Feb 2015 at 14:27.
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  7. whs's Avatar
    whs
    Posts : 1,935
    Windows 7
       #17

    Kari, that sounds interesting but more complicated than my external SSD approach. And I don't know how your scheme would work when I move from Florida to Germany with everything in Florida shut down and a different ISP in Germany.
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  8. Kari's Avatar
    Posts : 17,434
    Windows 10 Pro
       #18

    For me the easiest and by far the simplest approach is to let home server run 24/7 and connect to virtual machines when on the home network using Virtual Machine Connection, and when away over remote desktop connection.

    In your case it would be to keep your virtual machines on an external device, connect it to any computer wherever you are (subject to the PC is running an OS which has Hyper-V) and create a new vm using existing virtual hard disks. This operation takes a minute and have to be done only once, next time the same media is connected to this PC the virtual machines are there.

    Anyway, the RDC option is so easy I wholeheartedly recommend it.

    Kari
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  9. whs's Avatar
    whs
    Posts : 1,935
    Windows 7
       #19

    (subject to the PC is running an OS which has Hyper-V)
    Here is one of the problems - most of my PCs don't support Hyper-V. But my system works for me. Why change if it ain't broke.
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  10. Posts : 59
    Windows 10 Pro x64 version 20H2
       #20

    Hyper-V runs cooler than VirtualBox!


    I have no recent experience with VMware, but with VirtualBox on Windows 7 and one or two VM's running but doing nothing, the CPU load on the host was always 10 to 20%.

    Now with Hyper-V on Windows 10 Pro, under the same conditions, the CPU load is only 2 to 5%.

    Since my host is a laptop, it runs quite a bit cooler!

    My 2 cents worth,

    Bart
      My Computer


 
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