Curious question

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  1. Hopachi's Avatar
    Posts : 1,290
    Linux: Fedora 3x 64-bit / Windows 10 Pro 64-bit in VM
       #11

    jimbo45 said:
    HYPER-V can create Linux VM's -- I have no idea about Solaris though.

    @Hopachi

    I did manage to create an XP VM on a HYPER-V machine which itself is a VM on KVM. If you do that though (nested VM's on KVM) you need to enable nested VM's in your kernel -- so HOST KVM->W10 VM with HYPER-V -> XP VM.

    response wasn't actually as bad as I thought it would be - so long as you have decent hardware and plenty of RAM -- also avoid slow HDD's.


    Cheers
    jimbo
    Thanks for mentioning it.

    Glad it works for you that way.

    So far some interesting nested cases around here.
    @jimbo45 runs Hyper-V in KVM host.
    @cereberus runs KVM in Hyper-V host.
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  2. pparks1's Avatar
    Posts : 1,919
    Windows 10 Pro
       #12

    tomdsr said:
    Do many here use vmware for virtualization?
    I have used VMWare ESXi and vSphere at work for many years. In my previous job, I had a licensed copy of VMWare Workstation and that worked best with integration to vCenter.

    tomdsr said:
    Seems most use hyper-v cause its built in and its free, or virtualbox, because its free.
    At home, my lab requirements don't really require me to run a handful of servers to run ESXi, so I just stick with a hypervisor I can run on Windows. Historically, that has been virtualbox....as it's free, and works well with Windows and Linux. While I like VMWare Workstation, I cannot justify the cost of $149 to $199 to run it for my home needs.

    The reason I am now using Hyper-V at home is because I really like WSL2 and I use Docker Desktop and both of these require windows components of Hyper-V (Virtual Machine Platform). With that enabled, Virtualbox runs in the "green turtle" mode and the VM's are outrageously slow under Virtualbox. If I could get Virtualbox back to it's native performance and still use WSL2 and Docker Desktop, I would do it in a heartbeat.
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  3. Bree's Avatar
    Posts : 20,593
    10 Home x64 (21H1) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #13

    jimbo45 said:
    ...I'm sure in any case W7 requires SMB1 for any sort of network communication.
    No, W7 supports SMB 2.1, even Vista had SMB 2.0. It's XP that can only use SMB1.

    Microsoft said:
    The SMBv2 protocol was introduced in Windows Vista...
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/win...le-smbv1-v2-v3
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  4. cereberus's Avatar
    Posts : 12,362
    Windows10
       #14

    pparks1 said:
    I have used VMWare ESXi and vSphere at work for many years. In my previous job, I had a licensed copy of VMWare Workstation and that worked best with integration to vCenter.



    At home, my lab requirements don't really require me to run a handful of servers to run ESXi, so I just stick with a hypervisor I can run on Windows. Historically, that has been virtualbox....as it's free, and works well with Windows and Linux. While I like VMWare Workstation, I cannot justify the cost of $149 to $199 to run it for my home needs.

    The reason I am now using Hyper-V at home is because I really like WSL2 and I use Docker Desktop and both of these require windows components of Hyper-V (Virtual Machine Platform). With that enabled, Virtualbox runs in the "green turtle" mode and the VM's are outrageously slow under Virtualbox. If I could get Virtualbox back to it's native performance and still use WSL2 and Docker Desktop, I would do it in a heartbeat.
    This still applies even with W10 and 11. You create a second boot entry where Hyper-V is switched off then vb runs like a hare not a turtle

    Switch easily between VirtualBox and Hyper-V with a BCDEdit boot Entry in Windows 8.1 - Scott Hanselman's Blog
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  5. pparks1's Avatar
    Posts : 1,919
    Windows 10 Pro
       #15

    cereberus said:
    This still applies even with W10 and 11. You create a second boot entry where Hyper-V is switched off then vb runs like a hare not a turtle

    Switch easily between VirtualBox and Hyper-V with a BCDEdit boot Entry in Windows 8.1 - Scott Hanselman's Blog
    Yeah, that's what I was having to do before on my Windows 10 setup at work. Once I got to the point of working with Docker on a daily basis, constantly having to reboot to switch between HyperV and Vbox got to be too much of a time waster. So, now I have just switched to using HyperV. If there IS something special that I cannot do in HyperV and need Virtualbox, I can go that route to get my speed back.
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  6. cereberus's Avatar
    Posts : 12,362
    Windows10
       #16

    pparks1 said:
    Yeah, that's what I was having to do before on my Windows 10 setup at work. Once I got to the point of working with Docker on a daily basis, constantly having to reboot to switch between HyperV and Vbox got to be too much of a time waster. So, now I have just switched to using HyperV. If there IS something special that I cannot do in HyperV and need Virtualbox, I can go that route to get my speed back.
    I do it slightly differently.

    I cloned my c drive into a vhd on a larger ssd (but set vhd to only 60 GB) and made it dual boot. The cloned version only has VB, main Host OS only has HyperV, so I just select which version to boot to. This is less space efficient but I have 2TB of space and only use a fraction

    I never bother backing up clone version as I can always do that again if it goes wonky.

    The reason I do it this way is the main C drive is kept lean and mean and I do not waste time when doing backups of host C drive with all the vb stuff bloating the host C drive. To me, it is cleaner but of course not space efficient. I rarely use VB now anyway. As I said main drawback of HyperV is getting sound on non Windows OSs, but it is possible with ubuntu.

    I must admit I struggle with Linux as instructions are like those car manuals that say

    step 1 - open the bonnet

    Step 2 - remove the motor

    The instructions go from simple to requiring deep knowledge very quickly.

    Unfortunately I tried asking on some Linux forums and most of the guys were rather intolerant of beginners. I am glad the forum members here are not like that.
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  7. tomdsr's Avatar
    Posts : 181
    10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #17

    cereberus said:
    I must admit I struggle with Linux as instructions are like those car manuals that say

    step 1 - open the bonnet

    Step 2 - remove the motor

    The instructions go from simple to requiring deep knowledge very quickly.

    Unfortunately I tried asking on some Linux forums and most of the guys were rather intolerant of beginners. I am glad the forum members here are not like that.

    Ya, some of it can seem easy, then it sounds like entry level rocket science. I am sooo thankful for google, and also another reason i do my linux learning in a vm. If im about to do something i shouldt, dont really know how, or just trying, i make a snapshot so if i blow it up lol.

    Snapshots, my favorite feature
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  8. pparks1's Avatar
    Posts : 1,919
    Windows 10 Pro
       #18

    cereberus said:
    I must admit I struggle with Linux as instructions are like those car manuals that say
    step 1 - open the bonnet
    Step 2 - remove the motor
    The instructions go from simple to requiring deep knowledge very quickly.
    Unfortunately that does happen. I've been doing Linux since around 1999, so I have a lot of experience. And I support it professionally for a living (as well as Windows servers, and cloud infrastructure), so I'm working with it day in and day out.


    cereberus said:
    Unfortunately I tried asking on some Linux forums and most of the guys were rather intolerant of beginners. I am glad the forum members here are not like that.
    Yeah, these folks give the Linux community a bad name. Sometimes it's intolerance like, (Go read the manual, I had to figure out so you should have to figure it out), but other times I think it's simply that you are probably talking to a person who is a sys admin or developer and they have been so engrained for so long that they simply cannot understand what help you may actually need as a beginner.

    The part I usually struggle with is that my experience in Linux is at the server level with things like the kernel, NFS mounts, LVM's, and applications like Bind (DNS), Apache/Nginx/Tomcat (web servers), SendMail/Exim (Mail relays), etc. None of my servers run a GUI. So, when I get to forums like this one, a lot of time people are looking for help with getting their audio working, or some type of application that uses the GUI and it's just not in my wheel house of things I have experience with doing. Therefore, I often don't have much I can provide in terms of assistance. And my experience is with the Enterprise type OS's as well, and almost exclusively RedHat Enterprsie Linux or CentOS.....so I don't always know the tricks of more mainstream desktop Linux distros like Ubuntu.

    But I'll always help out if I can.
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  9. ClippyBeer's Avatar
    Posts : 65
    DOS 6.22 Windows for Workgroups 3.11
       #19

    VMWare supports hardware accelerated 3D in the guest OS if the host supports it - VirtualBox and Hyper-V don't

    creating a VM
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  10. Hopachi's Avatar
    Posts : 1,290
    Linux: Fedora 3x 64-bit / Windows 10 Pro 64-bit in VM
       #20

    ClippyBeer said:
    VMWare supports hardware accelerated 3D in the guest OS if the host supports it - VirtualBox and Hyper-V don't

    creating a VM
    VirtualBox has that, not as good as VMWare but still.
    4.5. Hardware-Accelerated Graphics
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