Recommended way to "dabble" in Linux (SSD native, USB, or WSL)?


  1. Posts : 354
    Windows 10 v. 21H1, Build 19043.1348
       #1

    Recommended way to "dabble" in Linux (SSD native, USB, or WSL)?


    Recently I'd been wanting to familiarize myself with Linux again (long time ago I used to run a Sparc Workstation, then later on played with various flavors of Linux), but not quite sure about the best way to go about it.

    AFAIK there are 3 main ways to get into doing this:
    • Create an additional SSD partition and install Linux
    • Create a bootable removable media (e.g. USB drive, external SSD)
    • Utilize WSL

    I had gone ahead and made a bootable USB (16GB) for Linux Mint. Initially I couldn't access it, then realized it was due to UEFI as primary boot mode--changing to Legacy fixed that. It's very easy to do this on my HP laptop--just start up with the USB drive installed, press F9, and then select the boot option. In Linux Mint, I see the Windows "device" and can browse it. This makes me a bit nervous... as in the past I once ran into trouble with a Windows partition no longer bootable, despite no user actions to disturb files while running a Linux instance (had painful gyrations to fix MBR, etc.).

    The last one, WSL intrigues me. I hadn't been aware of WIndows 10 now offering this. On my primary system, I'm running Windows 10 20H2, with 16GB RAM and a 1TB SSD. Would running the WSL be the easiest, simplest, safest way to get into using Linux again? Is it essentially like a VM? Or is it quite limited and not able to convey the full Linux OS experience?
      My Computers


  2. Posts : 17,638
    Windows 10 Pro
       #2

    If you decide to go with WSL, method I sincerely recommend, check these tutorials:


    Kari
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 2,068
    Windows 10 Pro
       #3

    Wsl2 is a great way to utilize native nix tools in a windows environment. You aren't running a full linux system though, so if you want to work with a desktop, server software, etc.....I would go with a regular linux VM.
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  4. Posts : 17,638
    Windows 10 Pro
       #4

    pparks1 said:
    If you want to work with a desktop, server software, etc.....I would go with a regular linux VM.
    It's possible to get full desktop experience in WSL Ubuntu: Windows Subsystem for Linux - Add desktop experience to Ubuntu

    Kari
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 354
    Windows 10 v. 21H1, Build 19043.1348
    Thread Starter
       #5

    pparks1 said:
    Wsl2 is a great way to utilize native nix tools in a windows environment. You aren't running a full linux system though, so if you want to work with a desktop, server software, etc.....I would go with a regular linux VM.
    My only problem with running a VM is that I'm on Windows 10 Home... and as I understand it, I'd need to upgrade to Pro in order to get native VM support.

    Would it be worthwhile to get a 3rd party VM, or just go with booting up Linux?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Kari said:
    It's possible to get full desktop experience in WSL Ubuntu: Windows Subsystem for Linux - Add desktop experience to Ubuntu
    Kari
    Ah yes, I see now. Very interesting. Nicely done tutorial, Kari. Will check it out. Cheers! ~Gary
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  6. Posts : 2,068
    Windows 10 Pro
       #6

    I wouldn't dual boot with Linux. Just run Oracle virtualbox. Dont need 10 pro.
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 354
    Windows 10 v. 21H1, Build 19043.1348
    Thread Starter
       #7

    pparks1 said:
    I wouldn't dual boot with Linux. Just run Oracle virtualbox. Dont need 10 pro.
    Very cool to see that Oracle has made VirtualBox free/open-source.
      My Computers


 

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