How to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V

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  1. Posts : 1
    10
       #1

    How to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V


    This is assuming you have installed a Windows 10 VM running on a Windows 10 Hyper-V host. It further assumes that you have enabled Enhanced Sessions and can connect to the Enhanced Session (vmconnect.exe). (this means that you have enabled Guest Services in the settings for your vm and are NOT auto-logging in)

    These instructions may work with other configurations, but your mileage may vary. For completeness, I used Windows 10 Pro (20h2) as both host and vm for this. I am using a Logitech Brio USB 3.0 webcam as well as Zoom videoconferencing. I didn't want either active on the host. Keep in mind, your webcam will not be available to the host while it's connected to the vm.

    Lastly, I took the time to do this write-up because there were several incomplete and incorrect tutorials on the internet (including hacking the registry, modifying many policies, using rdp instead of vmconnect, adding RemoteFX cards to the vm, and paying for USB over ethernet services). Even though the policy we'll edit is talking about RDP, rest assured we will be connecting with vmconnect (like normal).

    The correct way (details below) is simple. It will take the average power user about ten minutes.


    If you have tried many different things so far, and you don't have success with these instructions, consider a new scratch install if time allows and is practical to do so.

    Lastly, I am posting this write-up here on TenForums because I have been helped by posts (and tutorials) here across the years and is my way of contributing something unique and valuable.

    If this was helpful, consider contributing a thread of your own someday.


    INSTRUCTIONS

    Shutdown the VM (shutdown, not pause, not save).

    On the host:

    click the Start menu and type "group" - select "Edit group policy"

    in the left pane of the editor, navigate to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Remote Desktop Services > Remote Desktop Connection Client > RemoteFX USB Device Redirection.

    ENABLE the "Allow RDP redirection of other supported RemoteFX USB devices from this compgter" policy.

    REBOOT the host. Don't skip this "just to see if it will work," actually reboot the host.

    Once the computer is restarted and you have logged in to the host, open the Hyper-V Manager and "Connect" to the Windows 10 VM you're working with.

    If you don't see the connection window, use the "Edit Session Settings" from the right-pane of the Hyper-V Manager (have the proper VM selected) OR if that doesn't work, you can force it from an administrative Powershell command:
    Code:
    vmconnect localhost YOURVMNAME /edit
    (put your vm's name in quotes if it contains a space)


    Once the connection window appears, click "more options," then on the "Local Resources" tab, click "More." Expand "Other supported RemoteFX USB devices" and check the box next to your webcam. Click "OK" and then "Connect."

    Here are some shots of how the connection window looks...

    How to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_31_25-33-desktop-l6po8eg-virtual-machine-connection.pngHow to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_31_56-connect-11.pngHow to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_32_05-local-resources.pngHow to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_30_57-33-desktop-l6po8eg-virtual-machine-connection.png


    Simply log in to your vm and configure Zoom or Teams or whatever app you will be using!

    I hope this has been helpful!


    modc
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 11,247
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #2

    modc said:
    This is assuming you have installed a Windows 10 VM running on a Windows 10 Hyper-V host. It further assumes that you have enabled Enhanced Sessions and can connect to the Enhanced Session (vmconnect.exe). (this means that you have enabled Guest Services in the settings for your vm and are NOT auto-logging in)

    These instructions may work with other configurations, but your mileage may vary. For completeness, I used Windows 10 Pro (20h2) as both host and vm for this. I am using a Logitech Brio USB 3.0 webcam as well as Zoom videoconferencing. I didn't want either active on the host. Keep in mind, your webcam will not be available to the host while it's connected to the vm.

    Lastly, I took the time to do this write-up because there were several incomplete and incorrect tutorials on the internet (including hacking the registry, modifying many policies, using rdp instead of vmconnect, adding RemoteFX cards to the vm, and paying for USB over ethernet services). Even though the policy we'll edit is talking about RDP, rest assured we will be connecting with vmconnect (like normal).

    The correct way (details below) is simple. It will take the average power user about ten minutes.


    If you have tried many different things so far, and you don't have success with these instructions, consider a new scratch install if time allows and is practical to do so.

    Lastly, I am posting this write-up here on TenForums because I have been helped by posts (and tutorials) here across the years and is my way of contributing something unique and valuable.

    If this was helpful, consider contributing a thread of your own someday.


    INSTRUCTIONS

    Shutdown the VM (shutdown, not pause, not save).

    On the host:

    click the Start menu and type "group" - select "Edit group policy"

    in the left pane of the editor, navigate to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Remote Desktop Services > Remote Desktop Connection Client > RemoteFX USB Device Redirection.

    ENABLE the "Allow RDP redirection of other supported RemoteFX USB devices from this compgter" policy.

    REBOOT the host. Don't skip this "just to see if it will work," actually reboot the host.

    Once the computer is restarted and you have logged in to the host, open the Hyper-V Manager and "Connect" to the Windows 10 VM you're working with.

    If you don't see the connection window, use the "Edit Session Settings" from the right-pane of the Hyper-V Manager (have the proper VM selected) OR if that doesn't work, you can force it from an administrative Powershell command:
    Code:
    vmconnect localhost YOURVMNAME /edit
    (put your vm's name in quotes if it contains a space)


    Once the connection window appears, click "more options," then on the "Local Resources" tab, click "More." Expand "Other supported RemoteFX USB devices" and check the box next to your webcam. Click "OK" and then "Connect."

    Here are some shots of how the connection window looks...

    How to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_31_25-33-desktop-l6po8eg-virtual-machine-connection.pngHow to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_31_56-connect-11.pngHow to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_32_05-local-resources.pngHow to Add Webcam to Windows 10 VM on Hyper-V-2021-02-16-15_30_57-33-desktop-l6po8eg-virtual-machine-connection.png


    Simply log in to your vm and configure Zoom or Teams or whatever app you will be using!

    I hope this has been helpful!


    modc
    Hi there

    Thanks for the info - but also remember that your HYPER-V VM must be Windows PRO or above because RDP server won't run on Windows HOME. (This is the VM -- and also the HOST needs to be WINDOWS 10 pro or above to enable HYPER-V for VM creation).

    Just reminding people that using RDP for video streaming over the Internet will be horribly slow -- this method only really works satisfactorily if you are on a FAST LAN !!!!! -- it would IMO seem to make more sense to use ZOOM etc on your own local computer (or the one you would be wanting to use to RDP to the Windows VM).

    You might have better throughput if on the remote computer (i.e the computer you are using to access the Windows VM) if you can make the connection via VNC rather than RDP. Also RDP connections aren't encrypted which could be a cause for security concerns when using things like ZOOM over a LAN unless it's your own internal (home) LAN.

    Anyway good info for the USB re-direction for those who have the appropriate edition of Windows.

    Note also if you use VMWare, VBOX, or KVM/QEMU the USB arbitration service is automatically enabled on the Host so if you just plug in the device the VM will "grab it" without any problem and your remote RDP session can use all the resources when enabled in the remote session. VMware and VBOX can also run on Windows HOME editions as well as on Linux boxes-- so don't need HYPER-V while KVM needs any Linux distro.

    Pretty well all laptops have a camera / webcam built in - and if not or you want a better one these things are available incredibly cheaply these days. People do what they do of course but I can't really see the point of doing ZOOM on a remote computer unless your local one is locked down -- but if that's the case would you be allowed to RDP to a home / remote non work computer anyway.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


 

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