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  1. Joined : Aug 2015
    Posts : 54
    Windows 10
       17 Aug 2015 #1

    Hyper-V: No "Insert Integration Services Setup Disk" option


    I added an existing .VHD (XP SP3 guest OS, which I originally created in Virtual PC 2007 running on an XP SP3 host OS) to Hyper-V via the Hyper-V Manager. It worked fine, except, I have no "Insert Integration Services Setup Disk" option in the Action menu, so I have no video, sound, or network drivers in the guest OS. I've already uninstalled the Virtual Machine Additions package from the guest OS (which is Virtual PC's version of Hyper-V Integration Services), rebooted, as well as deleted and reattached the .VHD from Hyper-V Manager several times, to no avail. There is no VMGUEST.ISO file in my Windows 10 System32 folder either, so I can't attach it to the guest OS's virtual DVD drive manually.



    I wish I could just have Virtual PC back. Even if I weren't having this particular issue, Hyper-V looks like a downgrade to me, at least with regard to what I use a virtual machine for. Virtual PC's keyboard shortcuts are better, the shutdown options are better, and the methods of attaching disc images are better. Hyper-V does seem to have plenty of powerful features that Virtual PC doesn't have, none of which I care about though. I only use a virtual machine as a sandboxed test bed for potentially malicious software and websites, and once I have the guest OS configured the way I want it, I always revert it back to that clean state when I'm finished. Virtual PC was perfect for this, and I doubt highly that there is any real reason why it can't run on Windows 10. In fact, I read a forum post where someone upgraded from Windows 7 (which they had Virtual PC installed on) to Windows 8, and Virtual PC continued to work fine. However, when you try to install Virtual PC on Windows 8, you get the same 0x80096002 error that you get when you try to install it on Windows 10, which tells me that Microsoft is just being belligerent; i.e., arbitrarily blocking the installation on Windows 8 and 10 just to irritate people.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  2. Joined : Oct 2013
    A Finnish ex-pat in Germany
    Posts : 9,501
    Windows 10 Pro
       17 Aug 2015 #2

    Hi MaximRecoil, welcome to the Ten Forums.

    All integration components are included in Hyper-V, there is no separate integration setup disk available. The full integration is called Enhanced Mode and it is only available for Windows 8 and later, Windows Server 2012 and later and Red Hat Enterprise and CentOS Linux guest operating systems. The Enhanced Mode adds for instance audio and video support.

    For the network issues, Windows XP requires a so called Legacy Network Adapter to be used on guests. Using the legacy adapter Windows XP has fully working network connections. About setting up a Windows XP guest in Hyper-V, see the tutorial (Part Five is about XP / Vista virtual machines): Hyper-V virtualization - Setup and Use in Windows 10 - Windows 10 Forums

    Running legacy Windows guests (as your Windows XP guest) in Hyper-V is best done using the Remote Desktop Connection instead of the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Connection application. Simply allow remote desktop connections in XP guest and use RDC to connect to it to get full audio and video. Remote Desktop tutorial: RDC - Connect Remotely to your Windows 10 PC - Windows 10 Forums

    Kari
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  3. Joined : Aug 2015
    Posts : 54
    Windows 10
       17 Aug 2015 #3

    Kari said: View Post
    Hi MaximRecoil, welcome to the Ten Forums.

    All integration components are included in Hyper-V, there is no separate integration setup disk available. The full integration is called Enhanced Mode and it is only available for Windows 8 and later, Windows Server 2012 and later and Red Hat Enterprise and CentOS Linux guest operating systems. The Enhanced Mode adds for instance audio and video support.
    Interesting. So that's another way in which it is a downgrade from Virtual PC, and apparently a downgrade also from when there was a separate integration setup disk available.

    For the network issues, Windows XP requires a so called Legacy Network Adapter to be used on guests. Using the legacy adapter Windows XP has fully working network connections. About setting up a Windows XP guest in Hyper-V, see the tutorial (Part Five is about XP / Vista virtual machines): Hyper-V virtualization - Setup and Use in Windows 10 - Windows 10 Forums

    Running legacy Windows guests (as your Windows XP guest) in Hyper-V is best done using the Remote Desktop Connection instead of the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Connection application. Simply allow remote desktop connections in XP guest and use RDC to connect to it to get full audio and video. Remote Desktop tutorial: RDC - Connect Remotely to your Windows 10 PC - Windows 10 Forums
    So I enable the legacy NIC, which will give me network, and connecting remotely will take care of the video and audio? I'll give that a try.

    I appreciate the very informative post by the way; but I'm annoyed with Microsoft constantly sabotaging things. Every time I have to use a newer product of theirs, it is a downgrade from what I had before (the only exception which comes to mind was when I went from Windows Me to XP back in 2002, which, wonder of all wonders, was a major improvement).
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  4. Joined : Oct 2013
    A Finnish ex-pat in Germany
    Posts : 9,501
    Windows 10 Pro
       17 Aug 2015 #4

    Hyper-V is not a downgrade from Virtual PC in any way. It is a superb virtualization platform for modern virtualization, offering much more than Virtual PC. Remote Desktop gives exactly the same services than Hyper-V's own Enhanced Mode.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  5. Joined : Aug 2015
    Posts : 54
    Windows 10
       17 Aug 2015 #5

    Kari said: View Post
    Hyper-V is not a downgrade from Virtual PC in any way.
    I disagree. Downgrade #1 is the fact that Virtual PC has VM Additions for Windows XP (and 2000, and Me, and 98, and 95, and NT 4.0 ...), while, according to your post, Hyper-V doesn't have the equivalent of VM Additions for any version of Windows prior to Windows 8. This means that no workarounds are required in order to have network (no "legacy adapter", and no manually creating a "virtual switch"; it just works) audio, and video (along with being able to seamlessly move your mouse pointer from the guest to the host, and drag and drop files from the guest to the host) when you install XP (or earlier) on a Virtual PC VHD.

    Also, VPC has better shut-down options; 4 of them automatically pop up when you click the "X" to close the VPC Window, my usual option being "Turn off and discard changes". On top of that, VPC uses the de facto standard keyboard shortcut for going from windowed to full screen and back, i.e., Alt + Enter, and in cases where you actually have to manually release a mouse cursor, you only need to press the right-hand Alt key to do so, rather than having to press 3 keys at once. On top of that, VPC doesn't run any background processes/services when it isn't being used, unlike Hyper-V (and VMware, for that matter).

    It is a superb virtualization platform for modern virtualization, offering much more than Virtual PC.
    None of that "much more" is any way relevant to what I use virtual machines for. Virtual PC does everything I want, quickly, easily, and smoothly. That's probably because it isn't fundamentally a Microsoft product (it comes from Connectix), while Hyper-V is Microsoft all the way, as far as I know.

    Remote Desktop gives exactly the same services than Hyper-V's own Enhanced Mode.
    Not exactly. For example, you have to use the "legacy adapter", which, according to Hyper-V Manager's own dialog:

    "Communications through a legacy network adapter are slower than through a network adapter."

    I suspect that Virtual PC could be hacked to eliminate the arbitrary roadblock that Microsoft maliciously inserted into the installation file which prevents it from even attempting to install on Windows 8 or 10.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  6. Joined : Oct 2013
    A Finnish ex-pat in Germany
    Posts : 9,501
    Windows 10 Pro
       17 Aug 2015 #6

    Today you have to admit that Windows XP is a legacy OS. The Hyper-V offers excellent integration for modern Windows and Linux clients with built-in integration, no need for additional software. For legacy Windows you have the RDC.

    In addition, Hyper-V's Checkpoints makes discarding changes and manually rebooting unnecessary. Just create a checkpoint, apply it when you want to discard your changes and in few seconds you are back where you started. Even better, you can choose if the Checkpoint takes you back to a desktop after a fresh boot (Production Checkpoint), or if it takes you back where all your apps are running at the same state they were when the Checkpoint was created (Standard Checkpoint). Using the Standard Checkpoint as an example, you could for instance at the moment of creating a checkpoint have a Word document open but not saved, a file copy process at 30% and a movie running at 47:35 timestamp, then go on to do your stuff, make a mistake, apply the checkpoint and you would be back in the earlier point, the unsaved Word document there, the file copy in progress at 30% and you movie playing at 47:35.

    In my personal opinion, meaning nothing else simply stating my opinion, if an argument like "in that other program I could do this with pressing one key, now I have to press three keys" is so important maybe using Windows 7 and Virtual PC would be better than migrating to Windows 10?
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  7. Joined : Oct 2013
    A Finnish ex-pat in Germany
    Posts : 9,501
    Windows 10 Pro
       17 Aug 2015 #7

    In addition to my previous post, about the checkpoints and how practical they are, here's a tip posted in Solved In-place upgrade - XP to 10 without losing the apps - Windows 10 Forums

    Tip   Tip
    For virtual machine users:

    I did the above test in a Hyper-V virtual machine, installing first Windows XP on it and in-place upgrading it to each next Windows version.

    Before I started the first upgrade, XP to Vista, I created a checkpoint. I then created a new checkpoint after each upgrade:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	9030d1417400697-place-upgrade-xp-10-without-losing-apps-2014-12-01_03h18_18.png 
Views:	178 
Size:	12.7 KB 
ID:	32102

    Now I have one virtual machine which I can revert in a few seconds to any of the Windows versions: I can go back to Vista, install software, save files, anything, then shutdown it and create a new checkpoint replacing the original Vista checkpoint, then return to Windows Eight (or XP, Seven or Ten).

    Practical!
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  8. Joined : Aug 2015
    Posts : 54
    Windows 10
       17 Aug 2015 #8

    Kari said: View Post
    Today you have to admit that Windows XP is a legacy OS.
    That's the main appeal (from my perspective) of running a virtual machine, i.e., running old OSs that aren't supported (in terms of drivers) on new hardware. Also, since software inherently runs slower on virtual hardware than it does natively on real hardware, it helps to have hardware that is a lot newer than the OS, to help make up the difference.

    The Hyper-V offers excellent integration for modern Windows and Linux clients with built-in integration, no need for additional software.
    I already have modern Windows installed natively on my hardware, and I have no need or want for Windows 8 in any form.

    For legacy Windows you have the RDC.
    Which is a workaround, and just try RDCing into e.g., Windows 98 for example. In VPC I had DOS 6.22, Windows 3.11 WFW (1152x864, 32-bit color and working network, no less), Windows NT 3.51 (also with high resolution and working network), NT 4.0, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows 2000, and Windows XP (all of those, from NT 4.0 and later had VM Additions, so working network and video goes without saying).

    In addition, Hyper-V's Checkpoints makes discarding changes and manually rebooting unnecessary.
    I didn't have to manually reboot. I just selected the "Turn off and discard changes option" and the VPC window closed instantly; I didn't have to wait for Windows to shut down or anything. The next time I started, it would be right back at the state that I liked to keep it in.

    Just create a checkpoint, apply it when you want to discard your changes and in few seconds you are back where you started. Even better, you can choose if the Checkpoint takes you back to a desktop after a fresh boot (Production Checkpoint), or if it takes you back where all your apps are running at the same state they were when the Checkpoint was created (Standard Checkpoint). Using the Standard Checkpoint as an example, you could for instance at the moment of creating a checkpoint have a Word document open but not saved, a file copy process at 30% and a movie running at 47:35 timestamp, then go on to do your stuff, make a mistake, apply the checkpoint and you would be back in the earlier point, the unsaved Word document there, the file copy in progress at 30% and you movie playing at 47:35.
    With VPC there isn't even any waiting a few seconds; you just close it. I've never needed or wanted to revert to a previous state in real time. When I'm done, I just close it, and the next time I start, the state is right back where I want it. From your description, it sounds like "Production Checkpoint" would be the equivalent of that. However, I like having the options pop up automatically simply by clicking the "X" button to close the VPC window. When I did that with Hyper-V, all I got was a warning that it was the same thing as cutting the power to an actual PC, which I already knew, but it doesn't matter in VPC if you are discarding changes anyway, and the option to do so is right there, instead of just a useless warning.

    I understand the versatility of multiple and configurable save states (checkpoints), but I have no need for that.

    In my personal opinion, meaning nothing else simply stating my opinion, if an argument like "in that other program I could do this with pressing one key, now I have to press three keys" is so important maybe using Windows 7 and Virtual PC would be better than migrating to Windows 10?
    I don't much like Windows 7. I don't really like Windows 10 either, for that matter. Since I like neither, I just went with the one which is presumably the most future-proof, thus [hopefully] extending the amount of time before I have to downgrade to a newer version of Windows again, for as long as possible. I like Windows XP, but my new hardware doesn't have drivers for it, and the writing is already on the wall for it in terms of mainstream software support; it is already pretty much past it in terms of mainstream hardware support, and of course, Microsoft support for it has already ended.

    I'm going to mark this thread as solved, because your first reply correctly answered my question. Unfortunately, it doesn't turn Hyper-V into an acceptable replacement for Virtual PC for me, but nothing can be done about that.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  9. Joined : Sep 2014
    Posts : 270
    Window 10
       18 Aug 2015 #9

    MaximRecoil said: View Post
    I disagree. Downgrade #1 is the fact that Virtual PC has VM Additions for Windows XP (and 2000, and Me, and 98, and 95, and NT 4.0 ...), while, according to your post, Hyper-V doesn't have the equivalent of VM Additions for any version of Windows prior to Windows 8. This means that no workarounds are required in order to have network (no "legacy adapter", and no manually creating a "virtual switch"; it just works) audio, and video (along with being able to seamlessly move your mouse pointer from the guest to the host, and drag and drop files from the guest to the host) when you install XP (or earlier) on a Virtual PC VHD.

    Also, VPC has better shut-down options; 4 of them automatically pop up when you click the "X" to close the VPC Window, my usual option being "Turn off and discard changes". On top of that, VPC uses the de facto standard keyboard shortcut for going from windowed to full screen and back, i.e., Alt + Enter, and in cases where you actually have to manually release a mouse cursor, you only need to press the right-hand Alt key to do so, rather than having to press 3 keys at once. On top of that, VPC doesn't run any background processes/services when it isn't being used, unlike Hyper-V (and VMware, for that matter).



    None of that "much more" is any way relevant to what I use virtual machines for. Virtual PC does everything I want, quickly, easily, and smoothly. That's probably because it isn't fundamentally a Microsoft product (it comes from Connectix), while Hyper-V is Microsoft all the way, as far as I know.



    Not exactly. For example, you have to use the "legacy adapter", which, according to Hyper-V Manager's own dialog:

    "Communications through a legacy network adapter are slower than through a network adapter."

    I suspect that Virtual PC could be hacked to eliminate the arbitrary roadblock that Microsoft maliciously inserted into the installation file which prevents it from even attempting to install on Windows 8 or 10.
    I used not work arounds and have full services (network, sound, you name it) with my XP virtual machine running in Hyper-V. I simply created the VM and installed XP. (XP has integration services available.) So I'm not understanding your points.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


  10. Joined : Aug 2015
    Posts : 54
    Windows 10
       18 Aug 2015 #10

    PJLLB said: View Post
    I used not work arounds and have full services (network, sound, you name it) with my XP virtual machine running in Hyper-V. I simply created the VM and installed XP. (XP has integration services available.) So I'm not understanding your points.
    According to Kari, Integration Services are not available for an XP guest. If you have Integration Services, then maybe the difference is that you installed XP through Hyper-V, while I attached a pre-existing XP installation (which I created a long time ago in Virtual PC 2007) to Hyper-V. I could try creating a new XP virtual installation through Hyper-V to see if that makes a difference, though it sucks to have to start all over.

    Edit: So I installed XP on a new VHD created with Hyper-V Manager, and there is no video, audio, or network drivers, and the mouse remains captured in the window, requiring you to manually release it; in other words, no different than the old Virtual PC-created XP VHD that I attached to Hyper-V in the first place.
    Last edited by MaximRecoil; 18 Aug 2015 at 13:22.
      My System SpecsSystem Spec


 
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