HyperV vs VMware. Different user account running in virtual OS.


  1. Posts : 45
    Windows 10 Pro
       #1

    HyperV vs VMware. Different user account running in virtual OS.


    New to virtualization. Need to work in a fully functional Linux OS.

    1. I read that the preinstalled HyperV in my W10 can run only limited functionality Linux distros. Does VMware allow full-blown Linux experience?

    2. Is it possible to run only a virtual OS as a standard user? I mean when I'm using my admin account I'm working in Windows but when I am switching to another user I am immediately in that virtual OS.

    3. Does having two systems impact the general PC performance in any way? I mean, except the resources that a virtual machine is using, does that component make the PC (disks, registry, RAM..) "less stable"?
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 11,207
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #2

    decimus said:
    New to virtualization. Need to work in a fully functional Linux OS.

    1. I read that the preinstalled HyperV in my W10 can run only limited functionality Linux distros. Does VMware allow full-blown Linux experience?

    2. Is it possible to run only a virtual OS as a standard user? I mean when I'm using my admin account I'm working in Windows but when I am switching to another user I am immediately in that virtual OS.

    3. Does having two systems impact the general PC performance in any way? I mean, except the resources that a virtual machine is using, does that component make the PC (disks, registry, RAM..) "less stable"?

    Hi there

    @decimus

    VMWare works 100% decently with most distros of Linux -- no restrictions on the GUESTS --I run some of the latest current insider builds of Windows using VMWare WKS 15.5 on a Linux host. There's no problems in using Linux VM's on VMWARE running on a Windows host either - for linux newbies probably a good way to start as using VMWare you won't get too much aggro with Linux video / audio drivers !!! as they will use the "Virtual hardware" for these devices. All Linux distros come with openvm-tools so you don't need to fiddle around with vmware's vmware tools as it's a pain to install on Linux guests.

    Probably the best version of Linux to use is ARCHLINUX as it does all the necesary compiling and pre-reqs --VMWARE installs and updates modules automatically on kernel changes too.

    ARCHLINUX is a bit tricky to install for "newbies" as you have to do it text base and if you've ever had to mess around with vi (the linux cli editor) good luck to you.

    However there is a great graphical installer called zen-installer which will guide even the newest novice through the process.

    Get it from here :

    Zen Installer download | SourceForge.net

    ensure you add the aur repository -- the installer guides you through the process step by step --great piece of work whoever created it !!!.

    The aur repository has extra software like vmware workstation so you don't have to download and install --once your archlinux system is up and running then simply type the following yay vmware-workstation (as non root). It will download, compile all the requirements and on starting the first time you will be prompted for license key. (vmware player is free though).

    Warning to users of Linux VM's / HOSTS -- kernels > 5.3.1 seem to break software RAID (mdadm) so if you need RAID use a distro where your kernel is at 5.3.1 or less. I'm sure this problem will be fixed in due course though.

    BTW Linux is a multi user system so on your VM the users do not even need to have an account on your Windows machine at all to be able to logon to the Linux VM - provided you've enabled remote logon - can easily be done from a Windows laptop. VM's on VMWARE these days once they are up and running are very efficient and only use memory when they are active (dynamic memory allocation). For Linux VM's try and use the RAW (Linux formatted) disks rather than the standard vmware disk format -- much better i/o perfoprmance too.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 45
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #3

    jimbo45 said:
    Hi there

    @decimus

    VMWare works 100% decently with most distros of Linux -- no restrictions on the GUESTS --I run some of the latest current insider builds of Windows using VMWare WKS 15.5 on a Linux host. There's no problems in using Linux VM's on VMWARE running on a Windows host either - for Linux newbies probably a good way to start as using VMWare you won't get too much aggro with Linux video/audio drivers !!! as they will use the "Virtual hardware" for these devices. All Linux distros come with OpenVMS-tools so you don't need to fiddle around with VMware's VMware tools as it's a pain to install on Linux guests.

    Probably the best version of Linux to use is ARCHLINUX as it does all the necessary compiling and prereqs --VMWARE installs and updates modules automatically on kernel changes too.

    ARCHLINUX is a bit tricky to install for "newbies" as you have to do it text base and if you've ever had to mess around with vi (the Linux CLI editor) good luck to you.

    However there is a great graphical installer called zen-installer which will guide even the newest novice through the process.

    Get it from here :

    Zen Installer download | SourceForge.net

    ensure you add the aur repository -- the installer guides you through the process step by step --great piece of work whoever created it !!!.

    The aur repository has extra software like vmware workstation so you don't have to download and install --once your archlinux system is up and running then simply type the following yay vmware-workstation (as non root). It will download, compile all the requirements and on starting the first time you will be prompted for license key. (vmware player is free though).

    Warning to users of Linux VM's / HOSTS -- kernels > 5.3.1 seem to break software RAID (mdadm) so if you need RAID use a distro where your kernel is at 5.3.1 or less. I'm sure this problem will be fixed in due course though.

    BTW Linux is a multi user system so on your VM the users do not even need to have an account on your Windows machine at all to be able to logon to the Linux VM - provided you've enabled remote logon - can easily be done from a Windows laptop. VM's on VMWARE these days once they are up and running are very efficient and only use memory when they are active (dynamic memory allocation). For Linux VM's try and use the RAW (Linux formatted) disks rather than the standard vmware disk format -- much better i/o perfoprmance too.

    Cheers
    jimbo
    Thanks for the reply. My distro of choice would be different.. So, can you run OS in VMWare full screen? I tried HyperV and only Ubuntu (which goes with HyperV Quick Creator) runs full screen. Others are very unstable and I can't (don't know how to) run them full screen.

    How about my questions 2 and 3?
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 11,207
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #4

    decimus said:
    Thanks for the reply. My distro of choice would be different.. So, can you run OS in VMWare full screen? I tried HyperV and only Ubuntu (which goes with HyperV Quick Creator) runs full screen. Others are very unstable and I can't (don't know how to) run them full screen.

    How about my questions 2 and 3?
    Hi there

    Question 2 -- a VM is just like a "Normal" machine so when you logon (whether on the HOST machine through the VMWare panel) or a via a remote connection such as rdp, krfc, tiger-vnc or whatever the host logon screen will appear just as if you had booted on a real machine so if you are the only user that will be fine --if you enabled auto login then just as will a "Real machine" you should be able to bypass the login screen.


    question 3: On VMWare to get sensible video resolution -- on Windows Guests you need to install VMWare tools. For Linux Guests the package open-vmtools is usually installed by default -- the only thing you need to do is set the resolution correctly.

    For VMware to switch between full screen and windowed simply press ctrl+alt+enter (on the guest machine) -- if you want 100% full screen which disables the switch back to windowed switch to "unity mode" --- to escape from unity mode back to normal operation simply press ctrl+alt

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 25,070
    10 Home x64 (21H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #5

    decimus said:
    1. I read that the preinstalled HyperV in my W10 can run only limited functionality Linux distros. Does VMware allow full-blown Linux experience?
    I tried HyperV and only Ubuntu (which goes with HyperV Quick Creator) runs full screen. Others are very unstable and I can't (don't know how to) run them full screen.
    I'm not a regular Linux user, but I do use a lot of Hyper-V VMs so I decided to see how easy or difficult it could be. Picked a Linux ISO at random to download (Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon). I installed as a Hyper-V VM by creating a new machine and setting it to boot from the ISO to install an OS. I tried both Generation 1 and Generation 2 machines, In gen 2 I had to turn off Secure Boot to get it to boot from the ISO. In all else I went with the defaults.

    Took a while to find out how to get it to use my full 1920x1080 screen resolution instead of the default '1152x864 (4:3)' but I found this thread had the answer.

    Using linux mint in hyper-v resolution problem

    Now it can run full screen. (My touch screen works too, wasn't expecting that.)

    HyperV vs VMware. Different user account running in virtual OS.-image.png
      My Computers


  6. Posts : 668
    Win 10 pro
       #6

    decimus said:
    New to virtualization. Need to work in a fully functional Linux OS.

    1. I read that the preinstalled HyperV in my W10 can run only limited functionality Linux distros. Does VMware allow full-blown Linux experience?

    2. Is it possible to run only a virtual OS as a standard user? I mean when I'm using my admin account I'm working in Windows but when I am switching to another user I am immediately in that virtual OS.

    3. Does having two systems impact the general PC performance in any way? I mean, except the resources that a virtual machine is using, does that component make the PC (disks, registry, RAM..) "less stable"?
    1 I use wmware worstation player with ubuntu as guest, and find it to be the best seamless experience if you need to run a linux workstation on windows host, I also use two monitors in ubuntu guest that are perfectly working with vmware.

    2. don't know, higly doub it.

    3. ubuntu runs really well as vmware guest, and have no stabilty issues, of course it would run faster on real hardware, but it runs pretty well nonetheless as a vmware guest.

    HTH
      My Computer


 

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