Hypervisor Type 1 and Type 2

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  1. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 10,506
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #11

    Hi folks
    @Kari
    @cereberus

    Network tests

    Skippy as Host (W10 X-64 Pro), Centos 7.5 as Guest

    External switch file xfer Linux-->TO Windows approx. 114 MB/s (note not Mb/s) for 5GB Video file xfer -- remember also that Linux file was on XFS device and transferred to a Windows NTFS device so some file translation must also have taken place.

    Same thing in reverse i.e Windows -->TO Linux speed around 25 - 30 MB/s so approx. 4 times slower ???

    Using the same devices for file transfer. Whether it's samba, windows or Linux not sure.

    Incidentally I get the same sort of file xfer speeds too using VMWare workstation so there's something either with the windows SMB / CIFS protocol or in SAMBA. I rather suspect it would be Windows as SAMBA has been running on zillions of machines worldwide for donkeys years and it's only recently Windows has been messing about with SMB protocols.

    I restored a W7 Ultimate X-64 Host and tested the same scenario on VMWare -=- not sure if W7 ever supported HYPER-V so I just tried with VMWare and the same Guest.

    Network file XFER approx. 114 MB/S both ways -- so IMO it's Windows 10 that still has something hosed up in Networking (That's a surprise isn't it !!!!!!!!!!).

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 5
    Windows 10 Pro
       #12

    So a type 1 hypervisor requires a host OS. The computer will boot into the host operating system automatically. The guest operating systems can be configured to be running or not by turning them on or off once you are booted into the host OS.
    Is my understanding correct? I'm trying to figure out why Hyper-V is a type 1 hypervisor, but boots into my W10 just as it did before enabling it.

    Will I see a performance decrease in any way by running games now that I have hyper-V enabled?
      My Computer

  3. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 10,506
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #13

    Hi there

    Any system will require some sort of OS as it will have to boot something as a bootstrapper (bootloader) to be able to load even a skeletal OS from a bootable device even if it's an sd card and pass instructions to start executing.

    In the BIOS there's code to execte an instruction to execute an instruction from a fixed address in the BIOS into memory which then reads a block of code from the boot device and starts executing it. This code then starts the load process of the OS which as in the case of a typical hypervisor could be quite tiny.

    Systems like EsXi (fits easily on to a small micro sd card) are really a tiny OS which can load up your VM as "data" and pass thru all the relevant hardware to the guest so effectively the Hypervisor uses almost nothing of the Host resources while the guest can run at almost native speed.

    The disadvantage of course with this approach is that the GUEST will require its own drivers which may or may not even be possible -- for example an XP machine would probably have no decent video drivers for running 4K UHD monitors !!!

    HYPER-V can run on a minimal server but most people for home use probably want some sort of GUI to manage, install and update the guest(s).

    For most people running VM's with standard programs as per VMware, Oracle VBOX etc being able to use "virtualised bios" and the host's drivers is usually far simpler - especially for older legacy OS'es such as XP, W7, Win NT etc and also for a load of Linux VM's where native drivers aren't always the easiest to find or get working.

    Having HYPER-V enabled shouldn't effect any other "Non Vm type of programs" running on your system if the guests aren't running. You can't though concurrently run type 1 and type 2 Hypervisors at the same time - i.e you can't run VMWare and HYPER-V concurrently (unless you "Nest VM's" but that's another whole story !!).

    Cheers
    jimbo
    Last edited by jimbo45; 10 Jan 2019 at 11:43.
      My Computer

  4. lx07's Avatar
    Posts : 5,479
    2004
       #14

    chrislw324 said:
    So a type 1 hypervisor requires a host OS. The computer will boot into the host operating system automatically. The guest operating systems can be configured to be running or not by turning them on or off once you are booted into the host OS.
    Is my understanding correct? I'm trying to figure out why Hyper-V is a type 1 hypervisor, but boots into my W10 just as it did before enabling it.

    Will I see a performance decrease in any way by running games now that I have hyper-V enabled?
    Your understanding is backwards. When Hyper-V is enabled then your Windows 10 Pro (that you are thinking of as a host) is actually running as a VM.

    It isn't *exactly* like that but it is pretty much true for most situations I can think of.

    And that is why it is Type 1 - what you imagine to be a host is already a guest (and so are all the other VMs you may create).

    As for performance - you might see a small decrease in disk IO and a rather larger decrease (sometimes very large) in network speed by turning on Hyper-V as the total is shared to all VMs (including what you think of as your host).

    Try it and see. I wouldn't bother enabling it unless you use it but in my experience (except for networking) the differences are small.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 5
    Windows 10 Pro
       #15

    lx07 said:
    And that is why it is Type 1 - what you imagine to be a host is already a guest (and so are all the other VMs you may create).
    But Windows 10 pro is a "primary guest" so to speak? In hyper-v, windows is required to configure and manage the other guests?
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  6. cereberus's Avatar
    Posts : 12,019
    Windows10
    Thread Starter
       #16

    You are confusing the hypervisor with Hyper-V.

    The hypervisor in type 1 sits under Windows (making windows a vm in effect).

    Hyper-v is merely a program that sets up a vm guest. There are others Exsi etc.

    They all use the same hypervisor.t is merely convenience to use the windows gui to set up other type 1vms e.g. a hyper-v vm.
      My Computer


 
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