Access denied

  1. Frank1's Avatar
    Posts : 316
    Windows 10
       #1

    Access denied


    How do I let Windows 10 know that when it comes to this computer, I am the owner, the administrator, the decision maker and the boss; and that I don't need anyone's permission to do what I want as long as the system is able to do it and it is legal.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 4
    Windows 10
       #2

    Frank1 said:
    How do I let Windows 10 know that when it comes to this computer, I am the owner, the administrator, the decision maker and the boss; and that I don't need anyone's permission to do what I want as long as the system is able to do it and it is legal.
    responding to find an answer as well...
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 14
    Windows 10 Pro 1607
       #3

    hansperdman said:
    responding to find an answer as well...
    I'm not certain its completely possible, but if your usual user account begins with admin rights and you lower the UAC threshold so it never pops up without a seriously bad reason, its probably as close as you can get to that level of control. If you're trying to delete/rename/disable windows system things as an experiment or otherwise,(such as removing the majority of cortana, which will at least prevent you from being able to access the windows store app by the way) you would need to edit the file or folder's advanced security properties in a way that your usual admin user account takes full ownership of the item(make sure to include subfolders and files, it'll help with backpeddling from the experiment without excessive repetition)

    I'm pretty sure you don't even have to have any of your users tied to an ms account to accomplish such control, but if you have multiple admins on the same system, you can create a situation where certain files and folders are only allowed to be accessed by specific admins. In that case access opens a small UAC-looking window that lists the required user and has a password entry field. I don't recommend going too in depth in modifying any specific files security permissions, as the more I've personally interfered in default security permissions, the longer the load time is for listing users or groups when even looking up a files security permissions.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 14
    Windows 10 Pro 1607
       #4

    Forgot to add that im on windows 10 pro, and i think I've heard that there's something extra it would have over the other editions involving its group policy editor, which i am not certain would be the same on windows 10 home or enterprise.

    Also something you should take into consideration is that if a file is in use, you shouldn't be able to modify or delete it, I assume that is because those objects are being manipulated by system programs in such a way that they take ownership during use, so having any extra control would likely be highly unstable and completely unusable.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 1,589
    Windows 10 Home
       #5

    Actually, for sure Windows 7, the Trusted Installer and the built-in admin acct are the Bosses; everyone else is 2nd level. I'm believing Windows 8 and 10 have something similar - based on comments on boards across the 'Net.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 14
    Windows 10 Pro 1607
       #6

    RolandJS said:
    Actually, for sure Windows 7, the Trusted Installer and the built-in admin acct are the Bosses; everyone else is 2nd level. I'm believing Windows 8 and 10 have something similar - based on comments on boards across the 'Net.
    Yep, I believe cortana's c:/windows/systemapp folder began with something like 'NT Service\TrustedInstaller' as the holder of default ownership in its security properties when i experimented with removing it from my system. Besides not being able to run the windows store app, opening my group policy editor would return two prompts mentioning geo location i assume is only related to cortana being missing.

    I've been playing around with running multiple users at the same time and group policy things involving those users so i thought doing something basic to the system as a whole like removing/renaming cortana could provide some insight into admin rights across multiple users, and in relation to the thread topic i guess you could say any admin user could reasonably fortify themselves with security permissions from one another without much trouble to the system as a whole.

    Once you're at that point, the only way to get more control would be to prevent new user accounts from being created, I'm not sure that would even be possible without making sure all of the users on a pc are regular users instead of admin users, and even then any of those users would be able to temporarily enable admin rights to add an admin account and change ownership privileges so it seems like you would only be interfering with your own accessibility in such a case.
      My Computer



 

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