Permissions and how to use them

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  1. Posts : 4,187
    Windows 11 Pro, 22H2
       #11

    Sure, brute forcing is going to be possible if someone uses a common word that could be found through a dictionary attack or a short password passphrase. But for a disk protected with the long Windows recovery key or a long / complex password or pass phrase, brute force is simply not going to cut it. Also, this would take a group with considerable resources. You average thief won't be able to gain access.
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  2. Posts : 4
    Win10/11
    Thread Starter
       #12

    Thanks for that, it all makes sense now.

    - - - Updated - - -

    hsehestedt said:
    You could also consider BitLocker rather than EFS.
    I have Win 10- Pro so this is an option. I've read that you can just encrypt a partition rather than a complete drive. Correct?

    When I copy a file from this partition to a non-encrypted partition, does it remain encrypted? I'm thinking about how you back up an encrypted partition. I supposed you'd have to setup an encrypted partition on the backup drive and copy from one encrypted partition to the other?

    I use two HDD's and swap them in and out weekly. This then raises more questions...

    Is there a good introduction to bitlocker that's worth reading?
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  3. Posts : 9,788
    Mac OS Catalina
       #13

    If you are swapping drives it will end up screwing things up in the end. As for a read on bitlocker, it can be broken as I posted in post #9.
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  4. Posts : 4,187
    Windows 11 Pro, 22H2
       #14

    HeyitsNeil said:
    Thanks for that, it all makes sense now.

    - - - Updated - - -



    I have Win 10- Pro so this is an option. I've read that you can just encrypt a partition rather than a complete drive. Correct?

    When I copy a file from this partition to a non-encrypted partition, does it remain encrypted? I'm thinking about how you back up an encrypted partition. I supposed you'd have to setup an encrypted partition on the backup drive and copy from one encrypted partition to the other?

    I use two HDD's and swap them in and out weekly. This then raises more questions...

    Is there a good introduction to bitlocker that's worth reading?
    Correct - you encrypt individual partitions with BitLocker.

    Also true - if you copy data from an encrypted location to a non-encrypted it gets decrypted on the fly.
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  5. Posts : 4
    Win10/11
    Thread Starter
       #15

    bro67 said:
    If you are swapping drives it will end up screwing things up in the end. As for a read on bitlocker, it can be broken as I posted in post #9.
    So what do people usually do in regards to encrypted data backup? Obviously, copying it as unencrypted data defeats the purpose of encrypting the data in the first place. Is using a single drive anymore secure than swapping and not prone to "screwing things up" - use one drive as a backup and the day it dies intermediately setup a new drive for backup?
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  6. Posts : 2,271
    Linux:Debian, Kali-Linux... 2xWin8.1,1x7Pro, Retro:1x2003server.1xXPpro, 1xW2k,1x98SE,1x95,1x3.11
       #16

    Have a look at Veracrypt as an option. VeraCrypt - Free Open source disk encryption with strong security for the Paranoid


    NOTE....... also always have at least two setups when use of encryption.
    The partitioning or the file can get damage by bit-rot or other things.. Recover data from encrypted drives/partitions or containers is slim to none.. So backup, backup and backup. There is a lot of people that has lost family photos and things do mistakes or failures.
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  7. Posts : 9,788
    Mac OS Catalina
       #17

    HeyitsNeil said:
    So what do people usually do in regards to encrypted data backup? Obviously, copying it as unencrypted data defeats the purpose of encrypting the data in the first place. Is using a single drive anymore secure than swapping and not prone to "screwing things up" - use one drive as a backup and the day it dies intermediately setup a new drive for backup?
    Important data you keep it stored with duplicates if needed. If your data is so secret that no one needs to see it, you would not be storing it on a computer, cloud storage, let alone have it readily available. I really doubt someone is going to want to know about your surfing habits. Tax and money info is already available through the proper channels on anyone.
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  8. Posts : 295
    Windows 10 Pro
       #18

    Depending on how computer literate you are, the easy way is Bitlocker. The more advanced way is Veracrypt, but it's very slow. Well, at boot up, and it'll halve the speed of an NVMe drive.

    First search engine result: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/...5-741561aae838

    Here's another explanation with an annoying JavaScript driven popup. LOL How to use BitLocker Drive Encryption on Windows 10 | Windows Central


    Yes, do use a long, complicated password. Refrain for dictionary words. Try to use the first letter of a word from music lyrics... Make it at least 20 characters long and ONLY committed to memory. Depending on your password crafting ability, it shouldn't be all that difficult to remember.
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  9. Posts : 4,187
    Windows 11 Pro, 22H2
       #19

    HeyitsNeil said:
    So what do people usually do in regards to encrypted data backup? Obviously, copying it as unencrypted data defeats the purpose of encrypting the data in the first place. Is using a single drive anymore secure than swapping and not prone to "screwing things up" - use one drive as a backup and the day it dies intermediately setup a new drive for backup?
    In order to use the data you have to unencrypt, so that doesn't defeat the purpose at all. The point is that at rest, the data is encrypted. In order to access the data and have Windows decrypt the data you need to unseal the TPM by providing a valid login, recovery key, etc. In other words, if someone were to take that hard drive and plug it into another system, or get their hands on your system, they would not be able to do anything with the data because they don't have the valid information to unseal the key to access your encrypted data.

    But this is also one of the reasons why backup software always includes the ability to encrypt data in its backups. When the backup program reads your data, Windows will decrypt the data, so the backup program sees it unencrypted (remember, that is expected AND desired behavior). The backup program the re-encrypts the data that it saves using its own encryption that it can read.

    Does that help?

    EDIT: Just to take this a step further, if you are backing up by simply copying data from one drive to another drive without the use of backup software, you would simply BitLocker that backup drive as well so that the backup drive is also encrypted.
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  10. Posts : 4
    Win10/11
    Thread Starter
       #20

    Gee, the rabbit hole does get deeper the further you go into encryption!

    How does one transfer data to a new PC? Given the previous post I assume you simply transfer the encrypted data to a new disk or similar then transfer the disk to the new PC. Thereafter, the data needs to be encrypted again in the new PC. Correct?
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