Why need an User of "Administrator" group Administration permission?


  1. Posts : 73
    Win10
       #1

    Why need an User of "Administrator" group Administration permission?


    Assume I work as user "peter". This User is member of Group Administrator.

    Now I want to edit and SAVE a simple text file in folder

    C:\Program Files (X86)\someprogramm\

    When I try to save it on the original place (=overwrite the existing one) the Win10 tells me something about unsufficient rights.

    So what?

    How can I assign real Administration rights to a user of group "Administrator"?


    Peter
      My Computer

  2. Wynona's Avatar
    Posts : 27,930
    Windows 10 2404 Build 19042.867
       #2

    pstein said:
    Assume I work as user "peter". This User is member of Group Administrator.

    Now I want to edit and SAVE a simple text file in folder

    C:\Program Files (X86)\someprogramm\

    When I try to save it on the original place (=overwrite the existing one) the Win10 tells me something about unsufficient rights.

    So what?

    How can I assign real Administration rights to a user of group "Administrator"?


    Peter
    I'm not sure if this is what you need, Peter, but here's a link in Wikihow:

    Easy Ways to Log in As an Administrator in Windows 10: 7 Steps

    The first paragraph in that article says that when I set up my computer:

    When you first start up Windows 10, you are walked through the set up of the first user account, which is set to administrator levels.
    So, I guess it would depend on whether your computer is controlled by an IT department, or whether it's your home computer and you want to add, say, your wife as Administrator.
      My Computer

  3. Try3's Avatar
    Posts : 7,380
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 20H2 Build 19042.868
       #3

    pstein said:
    How can I assign real Administration rights to a user of group "Administrator"?
    Peter,

    It already has "real Administration rights".

    When you log in to a user account that has admin status, you are nevertheless signed in with only standard user permissions. The admin prompt that you sometimes see is Windows' method of allowing you to grant admin status to a specific task.
    Why need an User of "Administrator" group Administration permission?-admin-consentui.png
    Admin prompt for an admin user account, actually called the "ConsentUI"

    When you try to alter something within a C:\Program files (x86) folder [and many other locations] Windows wants admin permission to be given. The easiest way to do this is to
    1 copy the file you want to change to one of your own folders,
    2 do the editing there, and then
    3 copy the edited file back to the desired folder - this provokes the admin prompt and allows you to give the admin permission that the folder needs.

    Notes [in view of the other posts] -
    4 Don't use the WikiHow procedure. It is not needed and it makes your computer vulnerable.
    5 Even when a folder within C:\Program files is owned by the System 'user' normal Admin permission through the ConsentUI is all that is required to authorise copying a file into the folder concerned. I have yet to find a folder for which this does not apply.
    6 If the file itself is owned by the System 'user' then there is a further step of taking ownership by your own 'Administrators' [note the plural - you'll create real problems if you take ownership by 'Administrator']. Change Owner of File, Folder, Drive, or Registry Key - TenForumsTutorials
    7 The approach I suggest also means, as a by-product, that you will have copies of all the files you've changed saved within your own folders as a backup that will persist even if the applications concerned are uninstalled. That's what I do - I have a ToolsDevn folder that has the edited copies of everything that has been copied into protected folders such as C:\Program files & C:\Program files (x86)

    Denis
    Last edited by Try3; 31 Jan 2020 at 10:27.
      My Computer

  4. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 6,028
    windows 10
       #4

    Two things the UAC can ask you to run as admin its a way of making sure you want to do it. The second thing is the folder may be owned by system which is above admin many program and windows folder are set that way to stop virus
      My Computer

  5. Berton's Avatar
    Posts : 10,477
    Win10 Pro Versions 2004 and 2009/20H2, Win10 Pro IP_Dev, Win10 Home 1909
       #5

    To add, it can be dangerous to one's peace of mind to save files they create in the same folder as a program is installed in instead of a folder listed in C:\Users\USERNAMEHERE\ such as Documents, Pictures, etc., or just in a separate folder in C:. If the program is uninstalled for whatever reason those created files can be deleted, not sent to the Recycle Bin, lost permanently.
      My Computers

  6. Try3's Avatar
    Posts : 7,380
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 20H2 Build 19042.868
       #6

    Wynona said:
    I'm not sure if this is what you need, Peter, but here's a link in Wikihow: Easy Ways to Log in As an Administrator in Windows 10: 7 Steps The first paragraph in that article says that when I set up my computer:
    So, I guess it would depend on whether your computer is controlled by an IT department, or whether it's your home computer and you want to add, say, your wife as Administrator.
    That WikiHow article advocates actions that render the computer open to hacking, it bypasses fundamental aspects of your computer's self-protection. Don't do it.

    To make things worse - it is not even necessary for what you want to achieve.

    Denis
      My Computer

  7. Wynona's Avatar
    Posts : 27,930
    Windows 10 2404 Build 19042.867
       #7

    Try3 said:
    That WikiHow article advocates actions that render the computer open to hacking, it bypasses fundamental aspects of your computer's self-protection. Don't do it.

    To make things worse - it is not even necessary for what you want to achieve.

    Denis
    Urk!!! Thanks, Denis.
      My Computer


 

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