How to Customize Colors of Console Window in Windows


A console (or "terminal) is an application that provides I/O to character-mode applications.

For example: command prompt, PowerShell, or Linux

In Windows, you can change the color of the screen text, screen background, popup text, and popup background of a console window to any color you want.

This tutorial will show you how to customize the colors of any console window (ex: command prompt, PowerShell, Linux) for your account in Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10.

The colors you set for a console window will only be applied to the specific console window shortcut that opened it.

For example, command prompt opened via Win+X menu VS Run (Win+R) dialog. Each location would have its own settings.



 CONTENTS:

  • Option One: To Customize Colors of a Console window in Properties
  • Option Two: To Customize Colors of a Console window using "Color" Command





Customize Colors of Console Window in Windows OPTION ONE Customize Colors of Console Window in Windows
To Customize Colors of a Console window in Properties

1. Open a command prompt, elevated command prompt, PowerShell, elevated PowerShell, or Linux console window you want using the shortcut or location you want to change the colors for.

You could also just directly right click on the command prompt shortcut or file, click/tap on Properties, and go to step 3 below.

2. Right click or press and hold on the title bar of the command prompt, and click/tap on Properties. (see screenshot below)

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3. Click/tap on the Colors tab. (see screenshot below)

4. Select (dot) Screen Text, Screen Background, Popup Text, or Popup Background for the item you want to change the color of.

5. Select the color you want for this item, or enter/select the RGB values you want for this item.

You can see a preview of your Select Screen Colors and Selected Popup Colors changes at the bottom to see if you like it or not before clicking on OK to apply.

6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 above if you would like to change the color of another item.

7. When finished changing colors for items, click/tap on OK.

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8. When finished, you can close the command prompt if you like. (see screenshot below)

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Customize Colors of Console Window in Windows OPTION TWO Customize Colors of Console Window in Windows
To Customize Colors of a Console window using "Color" Command

The custom foreground (text) and background colors you set using this option will only be temporary, and only used while the command prompt is open unless you use Option One above to set the current colors as default.
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1. While you have a command prompt, elevated command prompt, PowerShell, or elevated PowerShell console window open, do step 2 (custom color) or step 3 (original color) below for what you would like to do.


 2. To Customize Background and Foreground Colors of Console Window

A) Type the command below into the console window, and press Enter. (see screenshot below)

color <BackgroundColorValue><ForegroundColorValue>

Substitute <BackgroundColorValue> in the command above with the value (ex: "1") from the table below of the color (ex: "Blue") you want for the command prompt background.

Substitute <ForegroundColorValue> in the command above with the value (ex: "F") from the table below of the color (ex: "Bright white") you want for the command prompt foreground (text).

For example: color 1F

Value Color
0 Black
1 Blue
2 Green
3 Aqua
4 Red
5 Purple
6 Yellow
7 White
8 Gray
9 Light blue
A Light green
B Light aqua
C Light red
D Light purple
E Light yellow
F Bright white
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 3. To Restore Background and Foreground Colors used when Console Window was Started

A) Type color into the console window, and press Enter. (see screenshot below)

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That's it,
Shawn


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