Join Windows 10 PC to a Domain  

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
  1. Brink's Avatar
    Posts : 48,822
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro for Workstations build 19635
    Thread Starter
       #20

    rsbrux said:
    Thanks for the thorough tutorial. One thing bothers me though: Why do you recommend disabling IPv6?
    I have found a few other references that recommend this, but many other references (including Microsoft) strongly recommend against doing so, e.g.:
    Are you disabling IPv6? Maybe you should stop
    Arguments against disabling IPv6
    Guidance for configuring IPv6 in Windows for advanced users
    Can you edify me as to the rationale for disabling IPv6 when joining a PC to a domain?
    Do you recommend leaving it disabled, or should one reenable it after joining a PC to a domain?
    Hello rsbrux, and welcome to Ten Forums.

    If I remember correctly, it was an issue of not being able to join the domain if IPv6 was enabled.

    You can test joining the domain with IPv6 enabled to see if something may have since changed.
      My Computers


  2. Posts : 4
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64
       #21

    My situation may not be of interest to this audience, but I was able to join my laptop running Windows 8.1 Pro x64 to a domain managed by Synology Directory Server as DC, without disabling IPv6. Since joining the domain, the laptop seems to take longer to boot, but I do not have objective measurements. Some sources say that this could be due to delays caused by attempting to contact the primary DNS (also on the Synology NAS) via IPv6. I haven't been motivated to analyze this more deeply, as I plan to migrate the laptop to WIndows 10 soon. Thanks for your response!
      My Computer

  3. Brink's Avatar
    Posts : 48,822
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro for Workstations build 19635
    Thread Starter
       #22

    rsbrux said:
    My situation may not be of interest to this audience, but I was able to join my laptop running Windows 8.1 Pro x64 to a domain managed by Synology Directory Server as DC, without disabling IPv6. Since joining the domain, the laptop seems to take longer to boot, but I do not have objective measurements. Some sources say that this could be due to delays caused by attempting to contact the primary DNS (also on the Synology NAS) via IPv6. I haven't been motivated to analyze this more deeply, as I plan to migrate the laptop to WIndows 10 soon. Thanks for your response!
    Please share your findings. It'll be interesting to hear your results.
      My Computers

  4. Kari's Avatar
    Posts : 17,113
    Windows 10 Pro
       #23

    Windows Server has evolved a lot during past years. My tutorial about creating a domain controller in Windows Server 2016 was written in early 2016, and was still completely based on Windows Server 2012.

    The DNS system has been evolved maybe even more than Windows Server itself. The current status can be read at Microsoft Docs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/win...-in-dns-server

    Back in time, it was recommended that a network DHCP server should be used in Server as primary DNS server, and IPv6 should be disabled. Using localhost 127.0.0.1 as DNS server when IPv6 is disabled gives server or PC no network access.

    Today, with Windows Server versions 2016 and 2019, IPv6 does not have to be disabled. However, if using IPv6, the server's primary DNS server should be set to localhost 127.0.0.1 instead of local DHCP server, for instance 192.168.1.1.

    I take the full blame on this topic: My domain controller tutorial was based on older recommendations, and this tutorial from Brink was based on my tutorial.

    It is totally OK today to use IPv6 in Active Directory domain.

    Kari
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 4
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64
       #24

    @Karl, thanks for the clarification. I'm not sure how relevant the reference is, since I am not running a Windows Server.

    @Brink, A quick look at the events log showed a couple of timeouts trying to start NordVPN services, even though I had VPN turned off by default. After uninstalling NordVPN, startup is significantly faster, but still not what I would expect from a system running off SSD. OTOH, WIndows is notorious for slowing down over time, so maybe it will run faster after a clean install of Windows 10.
      My Computer

  6. Brink's Avatar
    Posts : 48,822
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro for Workstations build 19635
    Thread Starter
       #25

    Thank you @Kari. Tutorial updated to remove the requirement to disable IPv6.
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 4
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64
       #26

    Further examining the Windows events log turns up the following recurring error, which appears to be the cause of the slow startup problem:
    Error 1055:

    The processing of Group Policy failed. Windows could not resolve the computer name. This could be caused by one of more of the following:
    a) Name Resolution failure on the current domain controller.
    b) Active Directory Replication Latency (an account created on another domain controller has not replicated to the current domain controller).
    Does anyone have a suggestion as to how I can fix this?
      My Computer



 

Tutorial Categories

Join Windows 10 PC to a Domain Tutorial Index Network & Sharing Instalation and Upgrade Browsers and Email General Tips Gaming Customization Apps and Features Virtualization BSOD System Security User Accounts Hardware and Drivers Updates and Activation Backup and Restore Performance and Maintenance Mixed Reality Phone


Related Threads
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 15:51.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums