Apply Windows Image using DISM Instead of Clean Install  

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  1. Posts : 138
    Windows 10
       #10

    @Kari @cereberus

    I have two questions...

    >> Why do you think applying the image is faster than the traditional USB method (via USB 2.0 or 3.0) -- just curious?

    >> When creating the boot entry via "bcdboot G:\Windows" command, if the " /s " flag isn't used to designate where the boot files should be added too, does Windows automatically know which partition to add the boot entry too? What if there was another disk (such as Disk 1) or primary partition.
    Last edited by KabyBlue; 01 Apr 2018 at 08:38.
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  2. Posts : 13,584
    Windows10
       #11

    Windows just knows where the bcd is it seems. I am guessing dism has been updated to search for an existing EFI even in a winpe environment.

    I am guessing here (@Kari may advise) that you would only need to use the /s if trying to create a fully bootable drive with its own EFI partition rather than modifying the exiting EFI partition.

    This would only make sense if you wanted a fully independent drive to boot from selecting boot drive from bios.

    I assume it is faster as dism is just more efficient, and cuts out all the internet, driver checking phases, multiple reboots etc.
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  3. Posts : 17,638
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #12

    KabyBlue said:
    >> When creating the boot entry via "bcdboot G:\Windows" command, if the " /s " flag isn't used to designate where the boot files should be added too, does Windows automatically know which partition to add the boot entry too? What if there was another disk (such as Disk 1) or primary partition.
    Installing on GPT disk on UEFI systems, boot records will be on C: drive by default. No need to use /s switch. On MBR disk / BIOS system, if the switch is not used, boot records will be stored on C: drive but using the switch you can store them on System Reserved (or another) partition.

    Note that on MBR disk, you also need to mark partition containing boot records active with DISKPART after adding deployed Windows with BCDBOOT.


    cereberus said:
    I assume it is faster as dism is just more efficient, and cuts out all the internet, driver checking phases, multiple reboots etc.
    Deploying with DISM does not decrease amount of reboots. The deployment phase has no reboots, the same when running a traditional clean installation until OOBE starts. The reboots will then occur when OOBE takes over from Windows installation, be it a deployment with DISM or running Windows Setup from install media.

    Kari
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  4. Posts : 13,584
    Windows10
       #13

    Kari said:
    Installing on GPT disk on UEFI systems, boot records will be on C: drive by default. No need to use /s switch. On MBR disk / BIOS system, if the switch is not used, boot records will be stored on C: drive but using the switch you can store them on System Reserved (or another) partition.

    Note that on MBR disk, you also need to mark partition containing boot records active with DISKPART after adding deployed Windows with BCDBOOT.




    Deploying with DISM does not decrease amount of reboots. The deployment phase has no reboots, the same when running a traditional clean installation until OOBE starts. The reboots will then occur when OOBE takes over from Windows installation, be it a deployment with DISM or running Windows Setup from install media.

    Kari
    Yeah of course you correct about reboots in deployment phase.
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  5. Posts : 13,584
    Windows10
       #14

    You would be better off deploying image to G. Then boot from a windows 10 installation drive, and just use bcdboot - as UEFI, you would not need the /s.

    If you tried to do by booting from wintogo drive, you would have to use /s to ensure it correctly updated EFI on drive 0.
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  6. Posts : 138
    Windows 10
       #15

    cereberus said:
    You would be better off deploying image to G. Then boot from a windows 10 installation drive, and just use bcdboot - as UEFI, you would not need the /s.

    If you tried to do by booting from wintogo drive, you would have to use /s to ensure it correctly updated EFI on drive 0.
    Solid advice. Thnx!
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  7. Posts : 1
    Windows 10 Enterprise 1709
       #16

    Including Bitlocker Pre-Provisioning


    Hi @Kari,

    That was an awesome Tutorial, exactly what I've been looking for !

    I have been doing a bit of experimenting and found that a slight modification to your procedure can be used to pre-provision Bitlocker encryption, as long as the machine has a TPM chip present and activated on the motherboard. This pre-provisioning, if successful, could save a few hours as compared to configuring it post-install.
    Note: all of the following worked on Win 10 Enterprise x64 1709 on both an old Laptop (non-UEFI, non-Secure Boot e.g. a 10 year old Dell Latitude E4200 ) and a modern desktop (Dell Optiplex 5040 w UEFI and Secure Boot).
    All that's needed is to insert a step between 2.6 and 2.7 which would check if the destination drive is encryptable, and, if it is then enable encryption of used space. Because the 'used space' at that point is almost zero it gets encrypted almost instantaneously. But, because the drive is now encrypted, anything that DISM adds to the drive gets encrypted on the fly ! End result is that when the installation is finished the drive is encrypted with Bitlocker and just needs a 'protector' (e.g. TPM and PIN) added ..

    Here's what worked for me ....
    - just after step 2.6, check that G: drive is actually encryptable (this also checks the BIOS, TPM activated etc.)
    run command 'manage-bde -status' (if that lists the volume as encryptable, then we're good to go to next ..)
    run command 'manage-bde -on G: -used' (that turns on bitlocker for the drive, and should finish after a few seconds ...... just wait a few seconds and verify that another 'manage-bde -status' now shows 100%)
    - .. now proceed to step 2.7

    At the end of the installation and after first bootup and logon you should see a little yellow triangle as well as an unlock icon on the drive, showing it's encrypted but with a 'clear protector' ...... then just need to add a protector, like TPM and PIN e.g. 'manage-bde -protectors -add c: -TPMAndPIN' where you will be prompted for PIN, and if all goes well, will be prompted to enter PIN in order for machine to boot up.
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  8. Posts : 32
    windows 100586.164
       #17

    Hi @Kari can this method be used to populate a HDD that plugged in to an existing installation, and once DISM is done move over the HDD to the Actual PC?

    Thanks in advance
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  9. Posts : 56
    Windows 10 Pro 1903
       #18

    2.8) DISM will now apply Windows image to selected partition (G: in this example). This partition will get the correct drive ID C: when image has been applied and Windows restarted.
    Is it possible to change the drive ID from C: to any other letter after Windows boots ? for the case when applying the image to a VHD ?
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  10. Posts : 3,846
    Windows 3.1 to Windows 10
       #19

    This Batch Fille will create an un-mounted Expandable (50GB max ) VHD
    With a Drive letter of G when Mounted
    Adjust " E:\TEST-WIN-OS.vhd " to assign vhd file location and name
    Adjust Label to Display Drive label when mounted

    Code:
    create vdisk file="E:\TEST-WIN-OS.vhd" Maximum=51200 Type=Expandable
    attach vdisk
    automount disable
    create partition primary
    online volume
    format quick fs=ntfs label="TEST-WIN-OS-VHD"
    automount enable
    assign letter=G
    exit
      My Computer


 

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