Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot  

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    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot

    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot

    How to Set Up Dual or Multi Boot using Macrium Reflect System Image
    Published by Category: Installation & Upgrade
    24 Jan 2017
    Designer Media Ltd


    information   Information
    If you ask me, Macrium Reflect should be obligatory, first application installed after installing Windows 10.

    Users often think it as just another backup application but in fact it is much more, giving more than any other free imaging solution. This tutorial will show how to use Macrium Reflect system images to set up a Dual or Multi Boot PC.

    Please notice that the method told in this tutorial works in all scenarios. You can have a later Windows version installed on your new UEFI / GPT system and set up an older Windows installation from a BIOS / MBR system to Multi Boot, or vice versa, or set up a new Windows 10 from a UEFI / GPT system to Multi Boot on an older BIOS / MBR machine. The partitioning system and Windows version on the Macrium image you have can be any Windows (Vista or later), any language, any bit version, using any partitioning system.

    This tutorial assumes you know how to create a Macrium image and in fact have already done that. In case you need help to get started with Macrium Reflect, see the tutorial for instructions and download:

    For more advanced usage of Macrium, see this thread:

    Screenshots in this tutorial are from Hyper-V virtual machine. However, this method can be used as told in all machines, physical and virtual alike, both in UEFI / GPT and BIOS / MBR setups.

    Regardless if the machine in question is UEFI or BIOS using GPT or MBR partitioning, this method can be used to set any Windows version (Vista or later) in any language and bit version to multi boot with your current Windows.

    Tutorial might look long and complicated but please take my word: this is an incredibly simple and uncomplicated procedure which takes less than a minute of your time (not counting time needed to create and restore a system image) :)

    Note   Note
    This tutorial shows a hypothetical scenario:
    • Old PC with Windows 8.1 on MBR partitioned disk on a legacy BIOS machine
    • New PC with Windows 10 on GPT partitioned disk on a UEFI machine
    • Setting old Windows 8.1 installation to dual boot on new PC with Windows 10





    Contents

     Use links to jump to any part of this tutorial


    Step One: Create System Image of old Windows installation
    Step Two: Restore Image to new PC
    Step Three: Add old Windows installation to new PC Boot Menu
    Step Four: Add Macrium Rescue to Boot Menu
    Step Five: Boot menu: Select Operating System
    Step Six: Activating restored Windows

    Tip   Tip
    Click screenshots to pop out, click again to enlarge.




    Step One

     Create System Image of old Windows installation


    1.1) Create a system image of the Windows installation you want to use in dual / multi boot
    warning   Warning
    Rest of this tutorial is based on fact that your full Windows installation you are making an image from is on C: drive.

    If main profile folder Users or parts of it, or any other system elements are relocated on any other drive than C: you must first reverse that, restore everything to C: drive.
    In this example I will make an image of Windows 8.1 PRO on old machine I do not want to use anymore

    1.2) Save the image on an external HDD or USB flash drive

    1.3) When done, close Macrium Reflect
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png




    Step Two

     Restore Image to new PC


    2.1)
    Attach the drive containing Macrium image made in Step One to new PC

    2.2) Open Macrium Reflect, browse to and open the image:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.3) Select the Windows partition C: of the image, click Actions, click Restore this partition:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.4) Select to which disk this Windows partition should be restored:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.5) In this example I have an empty 512 GB disk on my new Windows 10 machine. I select it:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.6) Now simply drag the C: partition from selected image to empty space on selected target disk dropping it there:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.7) Clicking Next and thereafter Finish will start restoring selected Windows partition from the image to selected disk on new PC:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.8) When done, close Macrium:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.9) My original Windows 8.1 disk was only 64 GB. I want it to have some more space available in my new dual boot system. I will extend its partition in Disk Management:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    2.10) I gave Windows 8.1 partition 125 GB (green in screenshot), assigning rest of the disk to a Data partition (yellow) shared by newly added Windows 8.1 and original Windows 10:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png




    Step Three

     Add old Windows installation to new PC Boot Menu


    3.1)
    Open an elevated Command Prompt (tutorial)

    3.2) Enter the following command, replacing X:\ with drive letter your restored Windows image got:
    Code:
    bcdboot X:\Windows
    In my case the Windows partition of the Windows 8.1 installation I restored to this machine got letter F:. I will use it (see screenshot in step 3.3)

    3.3) Above command adds Windows on selected disk to Windows Boot Menu. Last boot entry added will be the default operating system which will be automatically booted if user makes no selection in given time (default = 30 seconds). In this case Windows 8.1 became now my default OS

    I will change that, making my main OS Windows 10 default. As I am currently booted to that OS, its boot entry ID will be {current}. Using that ID I will set it to be my default OS with following command:
    Code:
    bcdedit /default {current}

    Commands from steps 3.2 & 3.3:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png




    Step Four

     Add Macrium Rescue to Boot Menu


    4.1)
    Open Macrium Reflect

    4.2) Select Other Tasks > Add Macrium Recovery Boot Menu Option:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    4.3) Select Windows PE 10.0:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png




    Step Five

     Boot menu: Select Operating System


    5.1)
    Restart the PC to see your new Boot Menu, select operating system to boot:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    5.2) In this example case I can now select and boot to original OS on new PC, Windows 10:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    5.3) ... or to restored OS from old PC, Windows 8.1:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png

    5.4) ... and in case of emergency, boot to Macrium Recovery Console:
    Macrium Reflect - Use Macrium Image to set up Dual / Multi Boot-image.png




    Step Six

     Activating restored Windows


    Note   Note
    Following activation guidelines are based on Microsoft general EULA.

    In some cases users have told about getting for instance OEM Windows activated on different hardware, however, as this is not something that happens automatically, every time, the following describes various activation scenarios solely based on EULA, known defaults and general Windows behaviour.

    6.1) Restoring Windows 10 image:
    • If restoring a Windows 10 image on other hardware than where it was originally installed and activated, it will in most cases be automatically activated if the new hardware has a digital license for that edition of Windows 10, regardless if the image was made from an OEM or Retail installation
    • In case no digital license for that edition exists, or Windows 10 is restored to new hardware, a genuine product key will be required
    • In case of any activation issues use Windows Activation Troubleshooter (tutorial)

    6.2) Restoring Windows 8.1 or older:
    • OEM Windows 8.1 or older image restored on other hardware will need a genuine product key to activate
    • OEM Windows 8.1 or older restored on hardware it originally came as pre-installed can be re-activated with product key from original sticker
    • Retail Windows 8.1 or older can be re-activated with original retail product key on different hardware
    • In case of any activation issues use Windows Phone Activation (tutorial)


    That's it geeks :)

    Kari

  1. topgundcp's Avatar
    Posts : 2,618
    MintMate19x64 Win10Prox64
       #1

    @Kari
    Step 2.7: Instead of clicking "Next", click on "Restored partition properties", extend the partition to 125GB then click "Next". No need for step 2.9
    Last edited by topgundcp; 24 Jan 2017 at 20:12. Reason: Typo
      My Computer

  2. f14tomcat's Avatar
    Posts : 47,935
    Triple boot - Win 10 Pro, Win 10 Pro Insider (2) - (and a sprinkling of VMs)
       #2

    Excellent, Kari. I totally agree with your opening statement.

      My Computers

  3. Kari's Avatar
    Posts : 17,160
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #3

    topgundcp said:
    @Kari
    Step 2.7: Instead of clicking "Next", click on "Restore partition properties" then extend the partition to 125GB. No need for step 2.9
    Thanks. Will do the edit later on, need to fire up virtual machines to get scenario redone for screenshots :)
      My Computer

  4. Kari's Avatar
    Posts : 17,160
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #4

    f14tomcat said:
    Excellent, Kari. I totally agree with your opening statement.

    Thanks!

    Let's repeat it, advice from old school geeks :

    If you ask me or esteemed fellow geek @Dick, Macrium Reflect should be obligatory, first application installed after installing Windows 10.
      My Computer

  5. cereberus's Avatar
    Posts : 11,421
    Windows10
       #5

    "If you ask me or esteemed fellow geek @Dick, Macrium Reflect should be obligatory, first application installed after installing Windows 10."

    If I could have my way, it would be the first even before Windows (actually I do that sort of in vms)
    .
      My Computer

  6. slicendice's Avatar
    Posts : 4,538
    Windows 10 Pro x64 v2004 Build 19041.329 (Branch: Release Preview)
       #6

    This tutorial is so freaking awesome! And I completely agree with your first statement about Macrium Reflect. Macrium makes things so easy.
      My Computers


  7. Kari's Avatar
    Posts : 17,160
    Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #7

    Thanks Slicendice :)
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 6
    Windows 10 and Windows 7
       #8

    I have a Windows 7 Pro image of my desktop system backed up on an external drive. I also have a Windows 10 image of my desktop system backed up on that same external drive. Both images are via Macrium Reflect (free version).

    I like both operating systems, and will usually alternate between the two by restoring one image or the other.
    While that process has worked well for me, I think it would be more convenient if I could set up a dual boot system where I could choose between either Windows 7 or Windows 10 when starting up my desktop. However, I’m a newbie at dual booting.

    Here’s some more info regarding my images. The Win7 image consists of two partitions: the System Reserved partition (24.9mb used of 100mb) and the NFTS Primary consisting of the OS and everything else (63.77 gb used of 232.79 gb). The Win10 image consists of three partitions: the System Reserved partition (354.9mb of 500mb), the NFTS Primary consisting of the OS and major programs (46.8 gb out of 121.58 gb), and the third partition being another NFTS Primary consisting of some portable apps (3.48 gb out of 110.81).

    I understand some of the info in this tutorial, but not everything. So, here are some preliminary questions (with more to follow):

    1. My thinking is to restore the Win10 image onto my desktop. Since the third partition has about 107 gb not being used (110.81-3.48), I thought I would shrink that partition to free up about 90 gb.
    2. Am I correct in wanting to then use Macrium Reflect to drag the image of the Win7 Primary partition to the Win10 90 gb free space created in above step 1? Can I actually do that if the Win7 Primary partition is 232.79 gb (63.77 gb being used)? Or do I have to first use Disk Management to shrink the Win7 Primary partition to about 65 gb and drag and drop that smaller partition to the Win10 90 gb free space created in step 1?


    Again, I've got more questions, but thought I'd tackle this issue first.

    Thanks in advance.
      My Computer

  9. ICIT2LOL's Avatar
    Posts : 4,466
    1010 Pro on all on various machines version 1909
       #9

    Hello Kari
    Mate I have just done a dual boot on this machine 7 / 10 and I went the through the tutorial and so I have it right I can image the whole drive and then use whichever partition to get back my system for example the 10 without necessarily having to do anything whit the 7 set up??
    John
      My Computer


 

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