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    Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10

    Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10

    How to Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10
    Published by Category: Browsers & Email
    08 Jun 2017
    Designer Media Ltd

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    Posts: 25,751

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    How to Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10

    information   Information
    Microsoft Edge is a new web browser that is available across the Windows 10 device family. It is designed for Windows 10 to be faster, safer, and compatible with the modern Web.

    Cookies are small files that websites put on your PC to store information about you and your preferences. Cookies can make your browsing experience better by letting sites remember your preferences or letting you avoid signing in each time you visit certain sites. Cookies can also help a website remember your location, so it can provide you with locally relevant content, like weather. However, some cookies might put your privacy at risk by tracking sites that you visit.

    This tutorial will show you how to allow or block cookies in Microsoft Edge for your account in Windows 10.

    Note   Note
    Microsoft Edge saves cookies to the folder locations below.
    • %LocalAppData%\MicrosoftEdge\Cookies
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\INetCookies
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\MicrosoftEdge\Cookies
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!001\INetCookies
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!001\MicrosoftEdge\Cookies
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!001\MicrosoftEdge\User\Default\DO MStore
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!002\INetCookies
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!002\MicrosoftEdge\Cookies
    • %LocalAppData%\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!002\MicrosoftEdge\User\Default\DO MStore


    Types of Cookies:

    Session cookie

    A session cookie, also known as an in-memory cookie or transient cookie, exists only in temporary memory while the user navigates the website. Web browsers normally delete session cookies when the user closes the browser. Unlike other cookies, session cookies do not have an expiration date assigned to them, which is how the browser knows to treat them as session cookies.

    Persistent cookie

    Instead of expiring when the web browser is closed as session cookies do, persistent cookies expire at a specific date or after a specific length of time. This means that, for the cookie's entire lifespan (which can be as long or as short as its creators want), its information will be transmitted to the server every time the user visits the website that it belongs to, or every time the user views a resource belonging to that website from another website (such as an advertisement).

    For this reason, persistent cookies are sometimes referred to as tracking cookies because they can be used by advertisers to record information about a user's web browsing habits over an extended period of time. However, they are also used for "legitimate" reasons as well, such as keeping a user logged into her email account so she does not have to enter her login credentials every time she opens her browser.

    Secure cookie

    A secure cookie can only be transmitted over an encrypted connection (i.e. HTTPS). This makes the cookie less likely to be exposed to cookie theft via eavesdropping.

    HttpOnly cookie

    HttpOnly cookies can only be used when transmitted via HTTP (or HTTPS). They are not accessible through non-HTTP APIs such as JavaScript. This restriction mitigates, but does not eliminate, the threat of session cookie theft via cross-site scripting (XSS). HttpOnly cookies are supported by most modern browsers.

    First-party cookie

    First-party cookies belong to the same domain shown in the web browser's address bar.

    Third-party cookie

    Third-party cookies belong to domains different from the one shown in the address bar. These sorts of cookies typically appear when web pages feature content, such as banner advertisements, from external websites. This opens up the potential for tracking the user's browsing history, and is often used by advertisers in an effort to serve relevant advertisements to each user.

    As an example, suppose a user visits Example Domain. This web site contains an advertisement from ad.foxytracking.com, which, when downloaded, sets a cookie belonging to the advertisements's domain (ad.foxytracking.com). Then, the user visits another website, Foo.com, which also contains an advertisement from ad.foxytracking.com/, and which also sets a cookie belonging to that domain (ad.foxytracking.com). Eventually, both of these cookies will be sent to the advertiser when loading their advertisements or visiting their website. The advertiser can then use these cookies to build up a browsing history of the user across all the websites that have ads from this advertiser.

    As of 2014, some websites were setting cookies readable for over 100 third-party domains. On average, a single website was setting 10 cookies, with a maximum number of cookies (first- and third-party) reaching over 800.

    Most modern web browsers contain privacy settings that can block third-party cookies.

    Supercookie

    A "supercookie" is a cookie with an origin of a Top-Level Domain (such as .com) or a Public Suffix (such as .co.uk). Ordinary cookies, by contrast, have an origin of a specific domain name, such as example.com.

    Supercookies can be a potential security concern and are therefore often blocked by web browsers. If unblocked by the client computer, an attacker in control of a malicious website could set a supercookie and potentially disrupt or impersonate legitimate user requests to another website that shares the same Top-Level Domain or Public Suffix as the malicious website. For example, a supercookie with an origin of .com, could maliciously affect a request made to example.com, even if the cookie did not originate from example.com. This can be used to fake logins or change user information.

    The Public Suffix List helps to mitigate the risk that supercookies pose. The Public Suffix List is a cross-vendor initiative that aims to provide an accurate and up-to-date list of domain name suffixes. Older versions of browsers may not have an up-to-date list, and will therefore be vulnerable to supercookies from certain domains.

    Supercookie (other uses)

    The term "supercookie" is sometimes used for tracking technologies that do not rely on HTTP cookies. Two such "supercookie" mechanisms were found on Microsoft websites in August 2011: cookie syncing that respawned MUID (Machine Unique IDentifier) cookies, and ETag cookies. Due to media attention, Microsoft later disabled this code.

    Zombie cookie

    Zombie cookies are cookies that are automatically recreated after being deleted. This is accomplished with the help of a client-side script. The script starts by storing the cookie's content in multiple locations, such as Flash local storage, HTML5 storage, and other client-side storage locations. When the script detects the cookie's absence, it recreates the cookie using the data stored in these locations.


    CONTENTS:
    • Option One: To Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge Settings
    • Option Two: To Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge using a REG file







    Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10 OPTION ONE Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10
    To Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge Settings

    1. Open the Microsoft Edge app.

    2. Click/tap on the More actions button on the toolbar, and click/tap on Settings. (see screenshot below)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Microsoft_Edge_cookie_settings-1.jpg 
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    3. Click/tap on View advanced settings towards the bottom. (see screenshot below)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    4. Under Cookies, select to either Don't block cookies (default), Block only third party cookies, or Block all cookies for what you want. (see screenshot below)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Microsoft_Edge_cookie_settings-2.jpg 
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    Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10 OPTION TWO Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge in Windows 10
    To Allow or Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge using a REG file

    Note   Note
    The .reg files below make modify the DWORD value in the registry key below.

    Code:
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Classes\Local Settings\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\AppContainer\Storage\microsoft.microsoftedge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\MicrosoftEdge\Main

    Cookies DWORD

    0 = block all cookies
    1 = block only third party cookies
    2 = don't block cookies


    1. Do step 2, step 3, or step 4 below for what you would like to do.


     2. To Block All Cookies in Microsoft Edge

    A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the file below, and go to step 5 below.

    Microsoft_Edge_Block_all_cookies.reg

    download


     3. To Block Only Third Party Cookies in Microsoft Edge

    A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the file below, and go to step 5 below.

    Microsoft_Edge_Block_3rd_party_cookies.reg

    download


     4. To Don't Block Cookies in Microsoft Edge

    NOTE: This is the default setting.

    A) Click/tap on the Download button below to download the file below, and go to step 5 below.

    Microsoft_Edge_Do_not_block_cookies.reg

    download

    5. Save the .reg file to your desktop.

    6. Double click/tap on the downloaded .reg file to merge it.

    7. If prompted, click on Run, Yes (UAC), Yes, and OK to approve the merge.

    8. If Microsoft Edge is currently open, then close and reopen Microsoft Edge to apply.

    9. You can now delete the downloaded .reg file if you like.





    That's it,
    Shawn


  1.    30 Jul 2015 #1
    Join Date : Jul 2015
    Posts : 2
    Windows 10

    Thank you, Shawn
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  2.    30 Jul 2015 #2
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    Posts : 25,751
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro build 17046
    Thread Starter

    Glad it could help Sir James.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  3.    08 Oct 2015 #3
    Join Date : Feb 2015
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 18,015
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu

    Shawn I couldn't find a tut on the subject of deleting cookies in Edgem, so I thought I'd post here
    .
    You know how Ccleaner isn't deleting them(or at the very least, all of them) even after 2 or 3 tries? Well I right clicked(aaah right clicking, one of my favorite tools) in Ccleaner chose "Open containing folder" and got these to positions for two sorts of cookies:

    C:\Users\Cliff S\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!001\MicrosoftEdge\Cookies
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screenshot (170).png 
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ID:	41724
    I have no idea what kind of cookies these are, possibly settings for Edge and ones for Cortana?

    C:\Users\Cliff S\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe\AC\#!001\MicrosoftEdge\User\Default\D OMStore\83YS42D4
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screenshot (169).png 
Views:	1191 
Size:	517.8 KB 
ID:	41723
    The Tweakin(dot)com, googleads and youtube should have been deleted...
    Now the question is, do you think you could come up with something to zap'em? Or maybe a tut to inform? They don't even get deleted using Edges own "Clear browsing data", or are they the type that come back because of syncing?

    Either way, I thought I would bring it to your attention(and ask for knowledge sake)
    Last edited by Cliff S; 08 Oct 2015 at 13:08.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  4.    08 Oct 2015 #4
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    Posts : 25,751
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro build 17046
    Thread Starter

    Thank you Cliff. Added to the list.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  5.    08 Oct 2015 #5
    Join Date : Feb 2015
    Bamberg Germany
    Posts : 18,015
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu

    Quote Originally Posted by Brink View Post
    Thank you Cliff. Added to the list.
    Sorry if I'm making you to much work, but I'm lousy at written tutorials, in the Army I rather took the hands on approach to teaching.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  6.    08 Oct 2015 #6
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    Posts : 25,751
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro build 17046
    Thread Starter

    It's no bother. Any recommendations are always welcomed.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  7.    12 Dec 2015 #7
    Join Date : Dec 2015
    Posts : 107
    Windows 10 Home Edition 64 bit

    Microsoft Edge will not keep the setting allow cookies or block third party cookies. When I go to websites that require cookies I get a message telling me to enable cookies, even though they are enabled in settings.

    Can the reg files listed in the tutorial for enabling or disabling cookies, be used with such an issue? Would you recommend blocking third party cookies?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  8.    12 Dec 2015 #8
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    Posts : 25,751
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro build 17046
    Thread Starter

    Hello Alicia,

    The .reg files set the same thing that are set in Microsoft Edge for cookies. You can try them to see if they may help.

    Usually, setting to "Don't block cookies" should work in this situation.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  9.    12 Dec 2015 #9
    Join Date : Dec 2015
    Posts : 107
    Windows 10 Home Edition 64 bit

    Thanks Brink. I used the reg file 'don't block cookies' and I still can't visit sites that require cookies enabled. It was worth a shot.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
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