Backup and Restore with Macrium Reflect  

  1. CountMike's Avatar
    Posts : 18,369
    W10+Developer Insider + Linux
       #1000

    fdegrove said:
    Hi,
    @CountMike
    Sure but that doesn't mean you have to include your data in a OS backup. I don't anyway but we all have our habits, don't we ?

    Cheers and best wishes to all,
    One more thing, I don't keep any significant and important data on same physical disk as OS and backed up data are always done offline, disk with such backup is in removable tray only while backing up.
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  2. Posts : 2,764
    Windows 10 Pro X64
       #1001

    Hi,

    Well then, we do pretty much the same thing. I use a Seagate external drive for data backup. Actually this consists mostly of copies of files for easy access.
    So there you go, same, same but different.

    Cheers,
      My Computers


  3. mck
    Posts : 122
    Windows 10 Home
       #1002

    fdegrove said:
    Hi,
    @mck
    That's how it works really. You image the partitions pertinent to W10 and when you restore these you will get back exactly what it was like at the time of when the image image was made.
    You can include partition D: if you like but you do not have to.
    Cheers,
    I see from one of your later posts that you actually do this. So thanks for your confirmation that it will work.

    - - - Updated - - -

    f14tomcat said:
    Even more than just a "D:" partition. I have multiple partitions on my boot disk. Insider and RTM and RP, etc. I can easily backup just my RTM win 10 ( in box) and restore without affecting anything else.

    Attachment 313456
    Thanks for your confirmation that you've done it and it works without affecting the other partitions that were not included in the system image backup. Very helpful.
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  4. f14tomcat's Avatar
    Posts : 53,175
    Multi-boot Windows 10 - RTM, RP, Beta, and Insider
       #1003

    mck said:
    I see from one of your later posts that you actually do this. So thanks for your confirmation that it will work.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Thanks for your confirmation that you've done it and it works without affecting the other partitions that were not included in the system image backup. Very helpful.
    You're quite welcome.
      My Computers

  5. Clintlgm's Avatar
    Posts : 1,083
    Win 10 pro Upgraded from 8.1
       #1004

    mck said:
    2. My current system SSD (500GB SATA) that is my Win10 system drive (C:), has 3 partitions as follows:
    .... 1. 499MB Recovery Partition.
    .... 2. 100MB EFI System Partition.
    .... 3. 465GB C: Partition.

    I expect the 2TB NVMe SSD to have those 3 partitions plus the D: partition. My question is if I image the 3 partitions above from the 2TB SSD, will that make the SSD bootable? IOW, are all boot records and what ever else is needed, included in partitions 1 or 2 above to make the SSD bootable?

    And if I restore the image backup of the system (the 3 partitions above) to the 2TB SSD, will that work without affecting the D: partition?
    No, however you can create a Partition C image, if you have an bad WU or some other C partition issue you can just Restore that C Partition Image. Yes I have done this many times. As long as your boot sector has not been damages it not necessary to restore the entire disk/SSD. For this reason I usually only run a 512GB m.2 NVME SSD for my OS. My new Precision 3440 came with a 256gb M.2 NVME SSD, I replace it with a 512GB M.2 NVME Samsung 980 Pro. And since I have a 2nd m.2 NVME slot I dropped in a 2 TB Samsung 970 EVO plus. Had I not had the 2nd slot I would have dropped in a 2TB 2.5 SATA SSD. Since I didn't have to I use the SATA Bay for a 3TB hard drive that I use for internal Back up. You don't really need the speed of M.2 PCIe for storage unless your regularly transferring huge files.
    Something else back to your regular question You could just restore all the partition with out the D Partition with a full disk/SSD Image but then you would need to restore your D partition from where ever you have it stored. Using a partitioning software such as MiniTool Partition Wizard to recreate your partition D then restore you D partition image to the newly created D partition
      My Computers


  6. mck
    Posts : 122
    Windows 10 Home
       #1005

    Clintlgm said:
    No, however you can create a Partition C image, if you have an bad WU or some other C partition issue you can just Restore that C Partition Image. Yes I have done this many times. As long as your boot sector has not been damages it not necessary to restore the entire disk/SSD.
    Sounds logical and makes sense. Thanks.

    For this reason I usually only run a 512GB m.2 NVME SSD for my OS. My new Precision 3440 came with a 256gb M.2 NVME SSD, I replace it with a 512GB M.2 NVME Samsung 980 Pro. And since I have a 2nd m.2 NVME slot I dropped in a 2 TB Samsung 970 EVO plus. Had I not had the 2nd slot I would have dropped in a 2TB 2.5 SATA SSD. Since I didn't have to I use the SATA Bay for a 3TB hard drive that I use for internal Back up. You don't really need the speed of M.2 PCIe for storage unless your regularly transferring huge files.
    Yes, you configuration is ideal. I actually planned to get the 2TB SSD to replace my 2TB mechanical HDD since it's hard to find 2TB HDDs with CMR. Most are SMR HDDs anymore and I definitely don't want a SMR HDD for my data drive. Since my motherboard has a M.2 NVMe slot, I decided to get a 2TB M.2 NVMe SSD. Then I started thinking about moving my 500GB SATA SSD to the new 2TB NVMe SSD and partitioning it to have the D: partition. That's how this all started.

    Something else back to your regular question You could just restore all the partition with out the D Partition with a full disk/SSD Image but then you would need to restore your D partition from where ever you have it stored. Using a partitioning software such as MiniTool Partition Wizard to recreate your partition D then restore you D partition image to the newly created D partition
    Too much work that way. Just image the ALL of the partitions except the D partition to backup Win10 and installed programs and restore that if necessary is a lot better. With the D partition I can backup my data more frequently without including the C partition. A little faster and smaller "data" backups that way.
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  7. Clintlgm's Avatar
    Posts : 1,083
    Win 10 pro Upgraded from 8.1
       #1006

    mck said:
    Sounds logical and makes sense. Thanks.


    Yes, you configuration is ideal. I actually planned to get the 2TB SSD to replace my 2TB mechanical HDD since it's hard to find 2TB HDDs with CMR. Most are SMR HDDs anymore and I definitely don't want a SMR HDD for my data drive. Since my motherboard has a M.2 NVMe slot, I decided to get a 2TB M.2 NVMe SSD. Then I started thinking about moving my 500GB SATA SSD to the new 2TB NVMe SSD and partitioning it to have the D: partition. That's how this all started.


    Too much work that way. Just image the ALL of the partitions except the D partition to backup Win10 and installed programs and restore that if necessary is a lot better. With the D partition I can backup my data more frequently without including the C partition. A little faster and smaller "data" backups that way.
    Yes that's why i keep my OS SSD At 512GB more than big enough for OS and programs. this is the drive most likely to have issues even then most times all that is needed is to restore the C partition Quick and easy, Data drive are slower to restore and most times you only need to restore certain files of folders which can be extracted from an Image. Rather than to restore the entire partition. MR is very flexible and Reliable I use it for all my local back ups mostly scheduled So I don't even think about them unless I need to restore something. I manually make C partition images prior to Feature updates and sometimes any WU or software installs.
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  8. CountMike's Avatar
    Posts : 18,369
    W10+Developer Insider + Linux
       #1007

    If you have any programs installed in second partition, restoring only one partition is likely to brake the link. Unless it's some space restricted device like a small laptop or an AIO keeping data on fast but expensive NVME doesn't make sense. SATA SSDs are plentiful and cheap nowadays and performance wise using them as data drives makes no difference. I'd rather have my eggs in different baskets.
      My Computers


  9. mck
    Posts : 122
    Windows 10 Home
       #1008

    CountMike said:
    If you have any programs installed in second partition, restoring only one partition is likely to brake the link. Unless it's some space restricted device like a small laptop or an AIO keeping data on fast but expensive NVME doesn't make sense. SATA SSDs are plentiful and cheap nowadays and performance wise using them as data drives makes no difference. I'd rather have my eggs in different baskets.
    I only install programs in the C partition. Never in any other partition.

    I actually bought a 2TB NVMe SSD to replace my 2TB HDD since 2TB HDD with CMR are getting rare and I don't want a data drive with SMR technology.

    The thing is that the Silicon Power 2TB NVMe SSD ($196) actually cost less than 2TB SATA SSDs like Samsung and Crucial that cost about $220 or so. So in my case, the 2TB NVMe SSD cost less than typical 2TB SATA SSDs.

    I could continue using my current 500GB SATA SSD for my system SSD and use the 2TB NVMe SSD for data only to replace my 2TB HDD. But I think having my OS on the NVMe SSD will be worth it to give me a faster experience.

    I plan to clean up my D drive that has a LOT of years and years of really old data that I "never" access. Good time to have a D drive with current data to have faster and smaller data backups. I won't delete my "old data" but will archive them on an external HDD. I'm trying to work out the best way to do that. Currently I plan to "move" data from my current D: HDD to the D: partition on the SSD. I plan to use the same folder names and hierarchy to match my D: HDD so I can continue as if nothing changed. .... If anyone has archived old data off of their data drive, I would love to hear how they did that.
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  10. ignatzatsonic's Avatar
    Posts : 2,406
    Windows 10 Home, 64-bit
       #1009

    mck said:
    If anyone has archived old data off of their data drive, I would love to hear how they did that.
    Ordinary drag and drop?

    You may be past the point of no return, but you might have considered 2 new drives: an NVMe of maybe 500 gb for the OS and all apps and a SATA drive of 2 TB for data only. It's useful to separate the 2 by entire drives rather than just by partitions.
      My Computer


 

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