See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10  

    See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10

    See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10

    How to See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10
    Published by Category: General Tips
    29 Sep 2018
    Designer Media Ltd



    information   Information
    A process is an instance of a program that is being executed. Each process running in Windows is assigned a unique decimal number called the process ID, or PID.

    Some legitimate applications require a full administrator access token (elevated) to perform their functions or tasks. For example, when a program that you are trying to run is giving you a Access Denied or No Permission type error.

    The User Account Control (UAC) message is displayed to request consent or credentials to allow an application to use the full administrator access token in any of the following circumstances:
    • The application developer marked the application to require an administrator access token. This is done by using a development technique known as an embedded manifest.
    • UAC detected that the application is an installer or setup application. (Automatic detection can be disabled by using Group Policy.)
    • Microsoft analyzed the application and provided an application compatibility shim. A shim is a small amount of extra code provided by Microsoft that supports certain non-Microsoft applications.
    • An administrator configured the application compatibility settings on the application's Program Properties page.
    • An interactive user right-clicked the application and then clicked Run as administrator to start the application.


    This tutorial will show you how to determine if an app or process is running as administrator (elevated) or not in Windows 10.



    Here's How:

    1. Open Task Manager in more details view.

    2. Click/tap on the Details tab, right click on the column header bar, and click/tap on Select columns. (see screenshot below)

    See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10-task_manager_uac_virtualization-1.png

    3. Check the Elevated and UAC virtualization box, and click/tap on OK. (see screenshot below)

    See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10-task_manager_uac_virtualization-2.png

    4. You can now look in the Elevated column to see if it says Yes or No for running as administrator (elevated). (see screenshot below)

    5. You can also look in the UAC virtualization column to see if a process (ex: regedit.exe) in the Name column is running elevated or not. (see screenshot below)
    Note   Note
    Not allowed = Running as administrator (elevated).

    Enabled = Subject to UAC virtualization.

    Disabled = Not subject to UAC virtualization.



    See also:


    See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10-task_manager_uac_virtualization-3.png


    That's it,
    Shawn






  1. Posts : 5,319
    Windows 11 Home
       #1

    Nice guide. The alternative is to install a better task manager, it will show it in color and in details.

      My Computer


  2. Posts : 64,502
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Thread Starter
       #2

      My Computers


  3. Posts : 2
    Win10 Pro x64
       #3

    Running regedit Elevated


    Purchased laptop from Dell 12/2015 and set up all my admin settings, but now I'm noticing changes from Dell's reimage changed those settings. How do you change regedit to run elevated if your already logged in as Admin.? I can run command prompt Elevated with noticing restrictions after reimaged with latest build from Dell, Hoping Anniversary build fixes.



    Win10 Pro x64 Inspiron 3542 latest build Dell reimaged May 2016 OEM
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 64,502
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Thread Starter
       #4

    Hello hpmini, and welcome to Ten Forums. :)

    Regedit should run as administrator by default when you open Registry Editor while signed in to an administrator account.

    Run as Administrator in Windows 10
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 2
    Win10 Pro x64
       #5

    Brink said:
    Hello hpmini, and welcome to Ten Forums. :)

    Regedit should run as administrator by default when you open Registry Editor while signed in to an administrator account.

    Run as Administrator in Windows 10
    I will check again by using Win + R regedit. In Win 7 used regedit.exe.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 3
    Windows 10
       #6

    What is meant No in elevated and Not Allowed in UAC Visualization
    See if Process is Running as Administrator (elevated) in Windows 10-2017_01_29_14_37_131.png
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 64,502
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Thread Starter
       #7

    Hello @SmartManoj, and welcome to Ten Forums. :)

    "No" means that the program is not running elevated (run as administrator), and "Not allowed" means you will not get a UAC prompt for it.
      My Computers


  8. Posts : 250
    Pro 20H2
       #8

    Brink said:
    "Not allowed" means you will not get a UAC prompt for it.
    For a running process, you already did not get UAC, right? (as opposed to "will not")
    If "Disabled", then likewise you already did not get UAC, right? How does it differ from "Not Allowed"?
    If "Enabled", then you already responded to UAC, right?
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 64,502
    64-bit Windows 11 Pro for Workstations
    Thread Starter
       #9

    thename said:
    For a running process, you already did not get UAC, right? (as opposed to "will not")
    If "Disabled", then likewise you already did not get UAC, right? How does it differ from "Not Allowed"?
    If "Enabled", then you already responded to UAC, right?
    Hello,

    Not allowed = Currently tunning as administrator (elevated).

    Enabled = Subject to UAC virtualization. Usually, you would get a UAC prompt.

    Disabled = Not subject to UAC virtualization. Elevation not required. Good for standard user.
      My Computers


 

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