Windows 10: Prime95 - Stress Test Your CPU  

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  1. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #10

    Dude said: View Post
    Cliff, is CIE disabled? That will cause it to drop too.
    Oh?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    It sure is, that's my boards default.
    Do you recommend it being turned on, or should I accept the down clock, which I have never seen before, and think of it as a "safety measure"?
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  2. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #11

    If I run CPU_Z(for a short bit) and P95 at the same time, I get my x49 back though.
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  3. Posts : 11,865
    Windows 10 Pro X64
       11 Mar 2017 #12

    What I meant is enabled it is a power saving feature. I think what is happennig is it is getting close to the TDP. You would have to change the settings I show here, increase them and it will run at your OC, and yes the temps may skyrocket then

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  4. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #13

    I have no idea what to set them too, maybe It's just better to leave it then. I get the OC when using stuff that needs it, it's just P95 that down clocks. what do you think, you have seen all my benchmarks>?
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  5. Posts : 11,865
    Windows 10 Pro X64
       11 Mar 2017 #14

    I would leave well enough alone, you score good in benchmarks. No need to stress the system with P95 as you will never see a load like that in real life
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  6. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #15

    Dude said: View Post
    I would leave well enough alone, you score good in benchmarks. No need to stress the system with P95 as you will never see a load like that in real life
    Ok, thanks. Funny how all these stress tests all act different on the same system. Realbench, for example will freeze when I'm OC'd, or totally screw up my system times when set to default(4.0GHz with one core @ 4.2GHz turbo boost) and Aida64 works normally.
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #16

    I just found this in the undoc.txt file that comes with the program. It might be worth trying:
    The program automatically computes the number of CPUs, hyperthreading, and speed.
    This information is used to calculate how much work to get.
    If the program did not correctly figure out your CPU information,
    you can override the info in local.txt
    :
    NumCPUs=n
    CpuNumHyperthreads=1 or 2
    CpuSpeed=s
    Where n is the number of physical CPUs or cores, not logical CPUs created by
    hyperthreading. Choose 1 for non-hyperthreaded and 2 for hyperthreaded. Finally,
    s is the speed in MHz.
    As an alternative to the above, one can set NumPhysicalCores=n in local.txt.
    This is useful on machines that are somtimes booted with hyperthreading enabled
    and sometimes without. Normally, the program can detect this situation, but one
    notable problem case is a dual-CPU hyperthreaded machine, For example, take a
    dual-CPU quad-core hyperthreaded machine. When booted with hyperthreading enabled
    this is properly detected as an 8-core hyperthreaded machine. When booted
    with hyperthreading disabled, this is improperly detected as a 4-core hyperthreaded
    machine. If you set NumPhysicalCores=8, then the program will set the
    hyperthreading state properly no matter how the machine is booted.
    Hyperthreads rarely, if ever, help prime95's performance. Thus, by default, one
    cannot assign hyperthreads in the Worker Windows dialog box. To allow assigning
    hyperthreads, set this in prime.txt:
    ConfigureHyperthreads=1
    Local text for mine:
    OldCpuSpeed=4887
    NewCpuSpeedCount=1
    NewCpuSpeed=4008
    RollingAverage=1000
    RollingAverageIsFromV27=1
    ComputerGUID=2b2d4e7e4376a5458154adb60f742d9e
    CPUHours=1
    RollingStartTime=0
    Time to fix it I guess!

    And the moral of this story, four letters:
    RTFM
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  8. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #17

    Nope! didn't work either

    CpuSpeed=4900
    NumCPUs=4
    CpuNumHyperthreads=2

    NewCpuSpeedCount=0
    RollingAverage=1000
    RollingAverageIsFromV27=1
    ComputerGUID=7291f56af91dd756130b8a059d9d998b
    OldCpuSpeed=4900
    NewCpuSpeed=4900

    Still forcing 4.0 to 4.4GHz
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  9. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #18

    The program see's my 4.9
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  10. Posts : 21,014
    Win10 Pro, Win10 Pro N, Win10 Home, Win10 Pro Insider Fast Ring, Windows 8.1 Pro, Ubuntu
       11 Mar 2017 #19

    [review & conclusion]

    Ok the benchmark in P95 ran at 4.9, well actually fluctuated between 4.4 and 4.9GHz.

    But in my search for a possible/plausible answer, I have found out, even though P95 stresses the hardware, it's test are all about data integrity to the nth power, specifically finding prime numbers which are, among other things used in RSA Encryption:
    RSA encryption uses the difficulty of factoring the product of two large prime numbers to make sure hackers can't find your credit card number. To implement it, first you have to find two really big prime numbers and multiply them together.
    (which you shouldn't use too large of one) PSA: Do Not Use the New Prime Number for RSA Encryption - Scientific American Blog Network
    Discovered Primes


    1. 1996-Nov-13 Joel Armengaud discovered the 35th known Mersenne prime, 21,398,269-1
    2. 1997-Aug-24 Gordon Spence discovered the 36th known Mersenne prime, 22,976,221-1
    3. 1998-Jan-27 Roland Clarkson discovered the 37th known Mersenne prime, 23,021,377-1
    4. 1999-Jun-01 Nayan Hajratwala discovered the 38th known Mersenne prime, 26,972,593-1
    5. 2001-Nov-14 Michael Cameron discovered the 39th known Mersenne prime, 213,466,917-1
    6. 2003-Nov-17 Michael Shafer discovered the 40th known Mersenne prime, 220,996,011-1
    7. 2004-May-15 Josh Findley discovered the 41st known Mersenne prime, 224,036,583-1
    8. 2005-Feb-18 Dr. Martin Nowak discovered the 42nd known Mersenne prime, 225,964,951-1
    9. 2005-Dec-15 Curtis Cooper and Steven Boone discovered the 43rd known Mersenne prime, 230,402,457-1
    10. 2006-Sep-04 Curtis Cooper and Steven Boone discovered the 44th known Mersenne prime, 232,582,657-1
    11. 2008-Sep-06 Hans-Michael Elvenich discovered the 45th known Mersenne prime, 237,156,667-1
    12. 2009-Jun-04 Odd Magnar Strindmo discovered the 46th known Mersenne prime, 242,643,801-1
    13. 2008-Aug-23 Edson Smith discovered the 47th known Mersenne prime, 243,112,609-1
    14. 2013-Jan-25 Curtis Cooper discovered the 48th known Mersenne prime, 257,885,161-1
    15. 2016-Jan-07 Curtis Cooper discovered the 49th known Mersenne prime, 274,207,281-1
    https://www.mersenne.org/various/history.php

    From the readme.txt
    This program is a good stress test for the CPU, memory, L1 and L2 caches,
    CPU cooling, and case cooling. The torture test runs continuously, comparing
    your computer's results to results that are known to be correct
    . Any
    mismatch and you've got a problem!
    Most programs you run will not stress your computer enough to cause a
    wrong result or system crash. If you ignore the problem, then video games
    may stress your machine resulting in a system crash. Also, stay away from
    distributed computing projects where an incorrect calculation might cause
    you to return wrong results. Bad data will not help these projects!

    In conclusion, if you are comfortable with a small risk of an occasional
    system crash then feel free to live a little dangerously! Keep in mind
    that the faster prime95 finds a hardware error the more likely it is that
    other programs will experience problems.
    The second school of thought is, "Why run a stress test if you are going
    to ignore the results?" These people want a guaranteed 100% rock solid
    machine. Passing these stability tests gives them the ability to run
    CPU intensive programs with confidence.


    So basically, even though P95 refuses to use my full overclock, in passing the test, I know at least my OC'd system is computing it's data correctly.

    If I want to test for heat, voltage, speed, and throttling, get BSODS and then back off, crash or freeze Windows, there are myriads of other benchmarking software and stress test out there.
    (/review & conclusion]
      My ComputersSystem Spec


 
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