Samsung begins mass production of industry first 4-bit consumer SSD

    Samsung begins mass production of industry first 4-bit consumer SSD

    Samsung begins mass production of industry first 4-bit consumer SSD


    Posted: 06 Aug 2018


    Samsung Electronics, the world leader in advanced memory technology, today announced that it has begun mass producing the industry’s first 4-bit (QLC, quad-level cell) 4-terabyte (TB) SATA solid-state drive (SSD) for consumers.

    Based on 1-terabit (Tb) V-NAND with outstanding performance equivalent to the company’s 3-bit design, Samsung’s QLC SSD is expected to bring a new level of efficiency to consumer SSDs.

    “Samsung’s new 4-bit SATA SSD will herald a massive move to terabyte-SSDs for consumers,” said Jaesoo Han, executive vice president of memory sales & marketing at Samsung Electronics. “As we expand our lineup across consumer segments and to the enterprise, 4-bit terabyte-SSD products will rapidly spread throughout the entire market.”

    With its new 1Tb 4-bit V-NAND chip, Samsung will be able to efficiently produce a 128GB memory card for smartphones that will lead the charge toward higher capacities for high-performance memory storage.

    Typically, as data stored within a memory cell increases from three bits to four, the chip capacity per unit area would rise and the electrical charge (used to determine information from a sensor) would decrease by as much as 50 percent, making it considerably more difficult to maintain a device’s desired performance and speed.

    However, Samsung’s 4-bit 4TB QLC SATA SSD maintains its performance levels at the same level as a 3-bit SSD, by using a 3-bit SSD controller and TurboWrite technology, while increasing drive capacity through the use of 32 chips, all based on 64-layer fourth-generation 1Tb V-NAND.*

    The 4-bit QLC SSD enables a sequential read speed of 540 MB/s and a sequential write speed of 520 MB/s, and comes with a three-year warranty.

    Samsung plans to introduce several 4-bit consumer SSDs later this year with 1TB, 2TB, and 4TB capacities in the widely used 2.5-inch form factor.

    Since introducing the 32-gigabyte (GB) 1-bit SSD in 2006, which ushered in the PC SSD era, to today’s 4TB 4-bit SSD, Samsung continues to drive new thresholds for each multi-bit generation.**

    In addition, the company expects to provide M.2 NVMe SSDs for the enterprise this year and begin mass production of 4-bit fifth-generation V-NAND. This will considerably expand its SSD lineup to meet the growing demand for faster, more reliable performance across a wide span of applications, such as next generation data centers, enterprise servers, and enterprise storage.

    *1Tb (128GB) x 32 = 4TB (4,096GB)

    **Samsung’s mass production history of SSDs in bits per cell


    Year
    Bit
    Nodes
    Chip Capacity
    Drive Capacity
    2006
    1-bit SLC (single-level cell) 70nm-class 4Gb 32GB
    2010
    2-bit MLC (multi-level cell) 30nm-class 32Gb 512GB
    2012
    3-bit TLC (triple-level cell) 20nm-class 64Gb 500GB
    2018
    4-bit QLC (quad-level cell) 4th-gen V-NAND 1Tb 4 TB

    Source: https://news.samsung.com/global/sams...t-consumer-ssd
    Brink's Avatar Posted By: Brink
    06 Aug 2018

  1. EdTittel's Avatar
    Posts : 4,130
    Windows 10
       #1

    Les Tokar also covered this over at the SSD review: Samsung Announces Mass Production of Industry SATA Drive | The SSD Review. There, he sheds some additional light on the new technology. Looks like it's about the same speed as the old mSATA technology but with much greater info density. Hopefully, that means it will also cost about the same as that older technology on a per bit/byte basis. If that's true, then a 2 TB drive of this kind should go for about $500. At that price I'd consider replacing my SSHD 2 TB 2.5" drives (use them for laptop backup on USB 3.0) with such stuff. If cheaper, it would be a slam dunk.
    HTH,
    --Ed--
      My Computers


  2. Posts : 80
    Windows 10
       #2

    I can see how this would be great news for laptop users, but all most desktops need is a very fast 256gb SSD boot drive and a cheap, reliable 1-4tb spinning drive.
      My Computer

  3. x509's Avatar
    Posts : 863
    Windows 10 Pro
       #3

    bobad said:
    I can see how this would be great news for laptop users, but all most desktops need is a very fast 256gb SSD boot drive and a cheap, reliable 1-4tb spinning drive.
    On my old Lenovo T530, I had a 512 GB SSD for my boot drive, and my data files. I put in a 1 TB HDD in the Ultra Bay, instead of using that space for a DVD drive. Unfortunately my new Lenovo T560 doesn't even have a DVD drive as an option, so I'm now forced to put that HDD into an external USB 3 case.
      My Computers

  4. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 10,558
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #4

    Hi there.

    at 500 USD for 2TB that's still much too expensive to be used in place of HDD's on a NAS or desktop computer.

    The price would need to drop to about the same as current HDD's or up to say 20% more and then it could make sense.

    As for laptops I've always found 250GB or 500 GB SSD's more than sufficient - if I need mass data on the move a 4TB self powered pocket size external usb3 HDD is excellent value for money and a good performer.

    Samsung though knows these sorts of Markets and I'm sure prices will drop quite rapidly once production ramps up -- providing "Chinese trade wars" don't get in the way -- the SSD's require in the manufacturing process "rare Earths" mainly found in China so that could be a potential future problem.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer

  5. Cr00zng's Avatar
    Posts : 698
    Windows 10 64-bits
       #5

    EdTittel said:
    Les Tokar also covered this over at the SSD review: Samsung Announces Mass Production of Industry SATA Drive | The SSD Review. There, he sheds some additional light on the new technology. Looks like it's about the same speed as the old mSATA technology but with much greater info density. Hopefully, that means it will also cost about the same as that older technology on a per bit/byte basis. If that's true, then a 2 TB drive of this kind should go for about $500. At that price I'd consider replacing my SSHD 2 TB 2.5" drives (use them for laptop backup on USB 3.0) with such stuff. If cheaper, it would be a slam dunk.
    HTH,
    --Ed--
    While I generally agree...

    I think that the USB 3.0 connection is the bottleneck even for rusty drives in some cases, never mind for SSD drives. To take advantage of the increased transfer speeds of the SSD drives, the system should support USB 3.1 or 3.2 interfaces.

    As for the target price, there are number of 2 TB SSDs available for a hundred bucks less, like this one. Performance wise, the new quad-level cell doesn't really improve when compared to the triple-level cell technology. At least, based on the initial performance data from your link. The differentiation at the moment seems to be just the maximum storage size between the two technologies.

    Let's hope that the triple-level cell technology will become even cheaper, when the new drives from Samsung hits the market. The storage technology is changing and building systems based on NVMe PCIe (x4) cards and SSDs aren't much more expensive nowadays, than doing the same with rusty drives....
      My Computer


 

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