Windows 10: Paging file VS readyboost on micro PCs with Solid state memory. Solved


  1. Posts : 4
    win 10 multiple versions
       30 Nov 2017 #1

    Paging file VS readyboost on micro PCs with Solid state memory.


    hello all,
    I have a question for the masses regarding Paging files vs readyboost. The situation I find myself in is that I have just purchased a Intel Compute Stick with the M5 prococessor, 4GB ram, and 64(usable 57) Gb storage. I am currently running windows 10 professional x64. I would like to optimize the performance of this device as much as possible. since there is no hardware upgradability I'm stuck using software tweaks and expandable storage(micro SD slot or USB3 is the only option). I plan on adding a 128GB micro SD card to improve storage and to reduce the need to constantly monitor how much onboard storage I have left. the question I have is would it be better for me to simply move my paging file from onboard storage to the SD and set a manual static paging size or to simply set a static paging file size and instead configure readyboost on he SD. a third option that just occured to me would be to combine both options, move the page file to the SD, set a static size, and use readyboost all on the SD card.

    primarily my reason for wanting the static size is so that storage capacity isn't dynamically filling my storage to capacity during heavy usage periods. which of the three makes the most sense to create the highest performance boost and create the best use of onboard storage.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  2. Posts : 4
    win 10 multiple versions
    Thread Starter
       01 Dec 2017 #2

    so, this came to a fairly disappointing end. apparently with Windows 10, Readyboost is a feature that the system can enable/disable depending on the hardware installed. since my system has 4GB of usable ram and a 4 core processor, it disables readyboost as an option because it is not slow enough to warrant it(in its opinion, not mine). furthermore, disabling the paging file will also disable the machine's ability to use readyboost to begin with. I'm not a software engineer so I'm not sure how the two interact and are inter-related but apparently there is a service called sysmain(which does not show up under services.msc), that is required by readyboost that is disabled when the page file is not set. lastly I have determined that the SD card does not mount until windows boots, so attempting to move the page file to the sd card fails because paging file must be set early in the boot process and the system just sets a temporary file on the SD after boot and gives you a nastygram on login.

    overall the only option available to me for memory optimization was to set a fixed page file size on the onboard memory and to set visual themes to maximum performance which greatly reduced disk usage(30%) and slightly reduced memory usage(5%) while running basic programs. I will see if there is anything in power options that can help performance as a whole but I'm marking this solved just because regardless of the answer to my original question, it's not an option available to me. I would still welcome answers to the original question for academic reasons.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    01 Dec 2017 #3

    Can we assume that the main storage is some form of solid state drive?
    If so, that is the reason.

    Readyboost is essentially a type of cache. A basic concept in any type of cache is that the media acting as the cache must be faster in some significant way than the media it is caching. Otherwise it would not be a cache at all and performance would be degraded, not improved. Your SD card is likely the slowest storage in the system and thus unsuitable for use as Readyboost

    But there is more. Readyboost works best in systems with limited RAM, generally less than 2 GB. With 4 GB RAM there is adequate RAM for caching purposes and Readyboost would do little to nothing. And even then it would depend on the SD card being faster than main storage, which it is not.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    01 Dec 2017 #4

    Ready boost is a complete waste of time on Windows 10 which uses compressed memory. Windows 10 keeps as much in memory as it can, to minimise pagefiling but pagefiles when RAM is needed.

    Use of garbage tools like readyboost are totally unecessary and are more likely to reduce performance rather than enhance it.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5.    01 Dec 2017 #5

    It never ceases to amaze me the number of users who want to move the paging file to the slowest storage device possible on their systems...
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    01 Dec 2017 #6

    NavyLCDR said: View Post
    It never ceases to amaze me the number of users who want to move the paging file to the slowest storage device possible on their systems...
    Yeah - "I read on a website you should do this to prevent ssd being written to and hence prolong its life"

    My flabber is always gasted that people perpetuate this last decade crap.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  7. Posts : 314
    Windows 10 Home 64-bit Edition
       01 Dec 2017 #7

    Would the USB port make a difference, using a 2.0 vs 3.0 on Readyboost? My laptop has 2 2.0 ports and 1 3.0 port.
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  8. Posts : 4
    win 10 multiple versions
    Thread Starter
       01 Dec 2017 #8

    you can assume correctly that it does have solid state storage. it's too small to allow a traditional form factor HDD. paging files work best with solid state storage because there's no mechanical use, but the side effect of having the paging file on the primary storage device, especially with windows 8 and 10 is that they are constantly expanding and shrinking with needs and while performing any task that requires read and write from the disk, the HDD/SSD becomes the performance bottleneck. in that regard moving the paging file to a secondary storage would make sense to reduce system requirements on the primary storage device, essentially load balancing. I doubt the USB would make a difference. all USB ports are USB3 on these things.

    now if I was trying to move it to a 4200RPM toshiba external HDD I would probably say you guys are correct that it's a stupid idea, but as I am only dealing with comparable, solid state storage options, I think some of the sarcasm could be left at the door.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    02 Dec 2017 #9

    tahunua001 said: View Post

    now if I was trying to move it to a 4200RPM toshiba external HDD I would probably say you guys are correct that it's a stupid idea, but as I am only dealing with comparable, solid state storage options, I think some of the sarcasm could be left at the door.
    You are not dealing with comparable, solid state storage options though. You are trying to compare an SD Card to the built in eMMC memory of the device. Unless you are going to go with the highest class of ultra high speed II SD Card. eMMC memory has advertised transfer rates of 400 MB/s. The highest class SD card, UHS-II runs at 300 MB/s. Your standard SD Cards run between 25 - 104 MB/s.

    The Fastest Memory Cards Money Can Buy | BH Explora

    https://www.amazon.com/Sandisk-Sdsdx...12ENTF22M73N5H

    Real world performance:
    Intel Compute Stick Review - Windows 8.1 PC For Under $150 - Page 3 of 5 - Legit ReviewsMicroSD and eMMC Storage Drive Speed Tests



    And the SD Card may not even be the limiting factor in speed, if the SD Card interface is not UHS-II capable.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 

Related Threads
How to Enable or Disable TRIM Support for Solid State Drives (SSD) in Windows 10 The TRIM command is essential to maintain the performance of solid state drives (SSDs) at an optimal level over the lifetime of the drive. TRIM functions by actively...
Read more: Samsung Electronics Accelerates the NVMe Era for Consumers with Its Highest Performing 960 PRO and EVO Solid State Drives Samsung Newsroom
Defrag for SSD Solid State Disk in Drivers and Hardware
I know that is Dangerous... why the Defrag of Windows want to do it???
I hope shortly to receive a "pre-owned" Dell M6800 laptop with a 128GB Solid State Disk (SSD) and a 750GB HDD. It comes with 8.1 installed (shudder) and I will upgrade to 10 immediately as I couldn't tolerate 8 or 8.1. Once I've done that, I'll...
So since I am 12 I am probably going to get a lot for Christmas. So I decided I will make my notebook laptop into a gaming PC. Before you think; Laptop.. Gaming PC? It is a beast of a laptop and it has beaten many desktops at video games,...
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:57.
Find Us