USB 3.0 Drive Slowing Down

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  1. FreeBooter's Avatar
    Posts : 3,995
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #11

    When copying files you should disable your antivirus and user account control this is because antivirus scans all files which are been copied which will slow down copy process and user account control checks to see if each file been copied needs elevation of administrators privileges which can again slow down file transfer speed.

    You should also defragment both drives that are been use to transfer files and the drive where files are stored.

    Defragmenting files is just one part of maintaining peak disk performance. Another important part is free space consolidation. Consolidating free space ensures that new files will be created quickly and contiguously - ensuring that peak performance is realized from the beginning. Free space consolidation also results in a faster performing drive - much faster than simply defragmenting files.

    To perform free space consolidation on the specified volumes execute following command.

    Code:
    Defrag C:  /X   /H
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  2. Posts : 2,764
    Windows 10 Pro X64
       #12

    Hi,

    I'm looking at all the information for the affected port, but I can't see anything wrong. Can anyone help me? I've uploaded the report.
    Can't see anything wrong with it either after comparing your file with mine. Odd...

    Cheers,
      My Computers


  3. Posts : 1,143
    Windows 10
       #13

    Usb300 : 1 (yes)
    .....
    DevIsOpAtSsOrHigher : 1 (Is operating at SuperSpeed or higher)
    Well according to the report your usb bus is ok . Now apparently this is a device issue , try switching the cable with the other optimum drive's cable , also try it out on a different machine and see if you get same results or better .
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  4. Shanester's Avatar
    Posts : 62
    Windows 10 Home 64-bit version 1909 build 18363.1440
    Thread Starter
       #14

    I'm sorry for the long delay.

    Mooly said:
    Backup files (as in system image files) tend to be one single file with only a few items in each. These should show as copying at high speed, probably around 60 to 80 Mbs.

    Copying user files such as several hundred or several thousand very small files may slow down to just 10 to 20kbs (yes that slow).
    USB 3.0 advertises transfer rates of up to 5 Gbps. 60 to 80 Mbps would be about 1% of the advertised speed. Is that accurate?

    nIGHTmAYOR said:
    Well according to the report your usb bus is ok . Now apparently this is a device issue , try switching the cable with the other optimum drive's cable , also try it out on a different machine and see if you get same results or better .
    I've tried a different cable. I know this is important because the USB cable is the only source of power for the hard drive. Unfortunately I can't try a different machine.

    Shane.
      My Computer

  5. cereberus's Avatar
    Posts : 12,014
    Windows10
       #15

    Shanester said:
    I'm sorry for the long delay.



    USB 3.0 advertises transfer rates of up to 5 Gbps. 60 to 80 Mbps would be about 1% of the advertised speed. Is that accurate?



    I've tried a different cable. I know this is important because the USB cable is the only source of power for the hard drive. Unfortunately I can't try a different machine.

    Shane.
    Mooly has mistakenly writen Mbps when he means MBps.

    Restriction on speed depends on max reasing speed of source drive, max writing speed of target, types of files (small files vs large files) etc. It takes a finite time to open and close small files, so the total processing time can be a lot more than the actual copying time.
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  6. Shanester's Avatar
    Posts : 62
    Windows 10 Home 64-bit version 1909 build 18363.1440
    Thread Starter
       #16

    cereberus said:
    Mooly has mistakenly writen Mbps when he means MBps.
    USB 3.0 advertises transfer rates of up to 640 MBps. 60 to 80 MBps would be about 10% of the advertised speed. I was originally hoping to get about 50% of their advertised speed. But is 10% the maximum we can expect?

    cereberus said:
    Restriction on speed depends on max reasing speed of source drive, max writing speed of target, types of files (small files vs large files) etc. It takes a finite time to open and close small files, so the total processing time can be a lot more than the actual copying time.
    Files are being copied from an internal 7,200 rpm SATA hard drive to an external 5,400 rpm drive. I'm copying my user directory (%UserProfile%). The smallest files are in \Favorites, and the largest are in \Videos.

    Shane.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 1,868
    W10 pro x64 20H2 Build 19042.610
       #17

    cereberus said:
    Mooly has mistakenly writen Mbps when he means MBps.
    Something like that :)

    I moved a large file today and so took a screen shot. This was to a Seagate HDD (not SSD) USB 3:0 drive. The file size was 17.1 GB and the actual time as measured took 2 mins 43 seconds. So that's 105MB/s actual which compares well with the 109MB/s that Windows showed at the instant I took the image.

    USB 3.0 Drive Slowing Down-transfer-speed.jpg
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  8. Shanester's Avatar
    Posts : 62
    Windows 10 Home 64-bit version 1909 build 18363.1440
    Thread Starter
       #18

    Robocopy seems to be more efficient when transferring large files. The largest files are in my /Videos folder. The Robocopy log says that the files were copied at 61 MBps.

    Someone (Clyde Tilley) posted a comment in a blog post saying that they fixed the problem by disabling Remote Differential Compression. However, Microsoft says not to do this. Do you know anything about this?

    Thanks,
    Shane.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 3
    Windows 10 Professional
       #19

    USB 3.0 Drive slowing down


    Wow, so much misinformation on this thread. Sorry I'm a bit late in replying to this. The first thing to check (after defrag status) when any mechanical (spinning disk) drive starts slowing down is the drive SMART (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) attributes. If sectors are starting to go bad, then this manifests itself as slow downs as the drive retries each failing sector multiple times before giving up.

    Windows doesn't usually surface any error messages to the user that things are going pear shaped which is why it's up to the user to run diagnostics themselves.

    Use a tool like Speed Fan to retrieve the current SMART values for the drive. Look for non zero values under Read/Write Error Rate, Pending Sectors, Reallocated Sector Count and Reported Uncorrectable Errors. A single or couple of errors is survivable. Anything more than a handful and the drive is well on it's way out and should be replaced.

    Hard Drives are particularly susceptible to invisble damage from knocks and drops. Reading off the SMART values is sometimes the only way to ascertain for sure if things are heading south.

    Be aware that basic USB to SATA interfaces used by some drive enclosures don't support reading SMART data. In this case you'd have to remove the drive from the enclosure and connect it another way to a working machine to retrieve the attribute values. Your local reputable computer shop may be able to help if this is beyond your capabilities.

    Also, 2.5" mechanical drives as used in most portable drives top out at around ~120MB/s. Modern 3.5" drives can hit around 220MB/s peak/sustained with large files. Note, that's MB (Megabytes) per second. It's the unit of measurement for drive surface to/from read/write head transfer speeds - sometimes referred to as the media transfer rate.

    The USB interface speed on the other hand is measured in Mb/s (Megabits per second) or Gb/s (Gigabits per second). There are a thousand Megabits in a Gigabit. And there are 8 bits in a byte, so divide Mb/s by 8 to get the rate in MB/s.

    480Mbps is the max theoretical transfer rate for USB2.0 and 5Gbps for USB3.0

    For large transfers, the whole transfer can only go as fast as the slowest part of the train, for USB3.0 this is always the media transfer rate - i.e. 120MB/s for a cutting edge 2.5" drive.
    Last edited by CB27; 08 Apr 2018 at 17:13.
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  10. Posts : 2,764
    Windows 10 Pro X64
       #20

    Hi,

    Wow, so much misinformation on this thread
    True but why add to it ?

    Slow USB transfers aren't pertinent to HDD, SSDs or any other media really, fixed or removable.
    Sure enough, damaged media support isn't going to speed things up but that's only one small aspect of the story really.
    SMART data may be absolutely fine and you can still experience sluggish USB transfers.

    Cheers,
      My Computers


 
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