Windows 10 System Files Growing

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  1. Bree's Avatar
    Posts : 18,623
    10 Home x64 (20H2) (10 Pro on 2nd pc)
       #11

    DavidY said:
    Another thing to bear in mind is that older versions of Windows 10 will have had more updates and take up more disk space.
    That's where the ResetBase switch is useful, it removes all those previous updates leaving just the latest...
    Note
    Using the /ResetBase switch with the /StartComponentCleanup parameter of DISM.exe on a running version of Windows 10 removes all superseded versions of every component in the component store.
      My Computers


  2. Posts : 1,232
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #12

    You might have already seen this but it interested me
    How to save more disk space with Compact OS on Windows 10
    How to Save More Disk Space with Compact OS on Windows 10
    Although the expert advice that has been provided addresses the following, a couple of my takeaways are:
    “Compact OS frees around 1.5 GB (32-bit systems) or 2.6 GB (64-bit) of hard drive space and kills the recovery partition”
    “After enabling Compact OS, the total installed size of Windows 10 comes out to around 9 GB for the 32-bit version and 11 GB for the 64-bit version”
    --- If you ran it, how did Tree Size turn out?
    It appears to me you have about 10GB of free space available on your computer.
    --- Naturally it would be great to improve on that.
    Since you do not use System Restore, I hope you create System Image backups.
      My Computer

  3. lx07's Avatar
    Posts : 5,479
    2004
       #13

    MeAndMyComputer said:
    You might have already seen this but it interested me
    How to save more disk space with Compact OS on Windows 10
    How to Save More Disk Space with Compact OS on Windows 10
    Although the expert advice that has been provided addresses the following, a couple of my takeaways are:
    “Compact OS frees around 1.5 GB (32-bit systems) or 2.6 GB (64-bit) of hard drive space and kills the recovery partition”
    “After enabling Compact OS, the total installed size of Windows 10 comes out to around 9 GB for the 32-bit version and 11 GB for the 64-bit version”
    That is a strange article. Compacting Windows certainly doesn't break recovery - why would it? The recovery partition is separate and so is the system partition that invokes it. I also find both 32 and 64 bit installs are much smaller (almost half) what he says and I've tested it a lot.

    What he does say in that article (which I find to be true also in my testing) is that compression improves performance. That really is an interesting observation as most people assume compression will make things slower.

    Anyway if OP wants to know what is taking the space they need to check what is taking the space. Anything else is just speculation.
      My Computer

  4. Berton's Avatar
    Posts : 10,505
    Win10 Pro Versions 2004 and 2009/20H2, Win10 Pro IP_Dev, Win10 Home 1909
       #14

    lx07 said:
    What he does say in that article (which I find to be true also in my testing) is that compression improves performance. That really is an interesting observation as most people assume compression will make things slower.
    I haven't a need yet to compress the Windows Folder but have noticed that Win10 File Explorer tends to open .zip/compressed files faster than the former Windows Explorer.
      My Computers

  5. lx07's Avatar
    Posts : 5,479
    2004
       #15

    Berton said:
    I haven't a need yet to compress the Windows Folder but have noticed that Win10 File Explorer tends to open .zip/compressed files faster than the former Windows Explorer.
    That is a separate thing really - the OS decompresses files it needs on the fly although they could certainly could have improved it. 7-zip is about 20% faster making the same zip file than Windows so there is certainly scope to improve things under the covers and perhaps they have.

    It is all a balance - whether the extra CPU time to decompress files is more (or less) than the reduction of time reading less data from disk.

    The new compression algorithms (xpressXk) are far more efficient (especially at decompression) than the old NTFS compression and generally most machines are IO not CPU bound. Perhaps if you had extremely fast storage and an extremely weak CPU then compression would be detrimental but I've never found it to be true in real life and I have some hardware with pretty ancient CPUs..
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 1,232
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
       #16

    lx07 said:
    That is a strange article. Compacting Windows certainly doesn't break recovery - why would it? The recovery partition is separate and so is the system partition that invokes it. I also find both 32 and 64 bit installs are much smaller (almost half) what he says and I've tested it a lot. What he does say in that article (which I find to be true also in my testing) is that compression improves performance. That really is an interesting observation as most people assume compression will make things slower. Anyway if OP wants to know what is taking the space they need to check what is taking the space. Anything else is just speculation.
    Very true, I also find it strange. I've looked up other articles about using a CompactOS: there isn't much consistency among them. I find your information much more reasonable especially with your experience. Thank you.

    Since it's happening on two different systems is also interesting: would manuals be available for each one of the netbooks to determine what the setup and expectations are for each system?
    I suspect it would be good for us to know what Tree Size came up with.
    Would Speccy include helpful information on what's going on?
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 1,520
    Windows 10 Pro (32-bit) 16299.15
       #17

    lx07 said:
    That is a strange article. Compacting Windows certainly doesn't break recovery - why would it? The recovery partition is separate and so is the system partition that invokes it. I also find both 32 and 64 bit installs are much smaller (almost half) what he says and I've tested it a lot.
    I think Microsoft's intention for OEM Windows 10 machines was always that they shouldn't have the traditional large Recovery partition with a complete backup image from when the machine was new. Instead the system should be able to reconstruct itself from WinSxS files, with the advantage that it would be using patched files to reconstruct.

    There's an interesting snippet here:
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/...isk-footprint/
    which is that the Reset function ignores the most recent 30 days worth of updates when doing this.
    All but the most recent 30 days of components updates are automatically used. That’s by choice: you might be resetting to deal with a problem with components that were upgraded in the last month, which would be counter-productive.)
    As you say this isn't directly related to whether or not Compact OS is used although I don't fully have my head around how that works, and whether it ends up running directly from the WinSxS files - I think that was more how Windows 8.1 WIMBoot worked though.
      My Computer

  8. cereberus's Avatar
    Posts : 12,012
    Windows10
       #18

    DavidY said:
    I think Microsoft's intention for OEM Windows 10 machines was always that they shouldn't have the traditional large Recovery partition with a complete backup image from when the machine was new. Instead the system should be able to reconstruct itself from WinSxS files, with the advantage that it would be using patched files to reconstruct.

    There's an interesting snippet here:
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/...isk-footprint/
    which is that the Reset function ignores the most recent 30 days worth of updates when doing this.


    As you say this isn't directly related to whether or not Compact OS is used although I don't fully have my head around how that works, and whether it ends up running directly from the WinSxS files - I think that was more how Windows 8.1 WIMBoot worked though.
    It is more or less the same as wimboot, but main difference is the wimboot files on the old 8.1+Bing were held in a separate partition so you effectively had two copies of winsxs. The wimboot folder doubled up as a recovery partition as well. Many people found to their horror when they deleted the c. 5 GB Recovery partition, they had destroyed Windows!


    It now works directly on the version in C drive. Up side is less space needed, down side is more chance theoretically of infecting winsxs folders on C drive with a virus. However, the folders are well protected and virus infections on winsxs are rare.
      My Computer


 
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