Why HDD was fast back-in-the-day, but so slow today?

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

  1. Posts : 4,542
    several
       #21

    Fox Computers said:
    Occasionally the program "Microsoft Teams" is installed through Windows Update, it is quite a resource intensive program. If you do not use Teams, be sure to disable it from starting up automatically when you turn your laptop on. Here is a guide on how to do that:

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/...EBD=Windows_10

    If you do not see Teams in the list, it is most likely not installed.
    yes, I remember having that issue trying win10 on a mechanical disk. Disabling teams made a difference.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 6,290
    Windows 11 Pro - Windows 7 HP - Lubuntu
       #22

    Massarelda said:
    I just don't get why HDD was fine with Windows 10 just a few years ago but now it is slow.

    Alot of computers must have been shipped with HDD and Windows 10, and they booted up fast when new.
    Slow and fast is not precise, it's relative.
    When I had a HDD as my main drive in 2011 on a i7 desktop I consider 3 min boot times normal. When I installed a 2.5" SSD drive in 2013 and the boot time dropped to 20 sec I saw how slow a HDD is compared to a SSD.

    Last March my nephew gave me an Asus i7 laptop (second on My computer specs). After a clean install it was booting in 3 minutes.
    I removed the ODD and replaced it with the HDD on a caddy and I added a small (128G) 2.5"SSD. It boots in 15 sec.

    Do you want to do a huge upgrade to your Lenovo? Install a mall SSD and use the HDD for data. (will cost ~US$25)
    This is a 12 years old i3 laptop with only 4G of memory. Works great.

      My Computers


  3. Posts : 4,542
    several
       #23

    win10 appears to be more demanding of the disk than earlier o/s , which makes it even more important to avoid mechanicals ( except for storage where it is much cheaper if you need a lot of space )

    According to Bryan the ultra cheap dramless things are not all that bad

    Are CHEAP Budget SSD's Worth It...!? (AliExpress) - YouTube
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 2,724
    Windows 10
       #24

    "I just don't get why HDD was fine with Windows 10 just a few years ago but now it is slow."

    It's not, the HDD is the same as it always was. You are not comparing like with like.

    Your test is a compound one mainly to do with Restarting Windows not your HDD speed.
    Windows has markedly changed over all those years so it is largely a fictitious comparison.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 15,474
    Windows10
       #25

    Massarelda said:
    I just don't get why HDD was fine with Windows 10 just a few years ago but now it is slow.

    Alot of computers must have been shipped with HDD and Windows 10, and they booted up fast when new.
    When W10 came out SSDs were "new kid on the block" and quite expensive. Vendors shipped with HDDs to keep costs down.

    Nearly a decade later things have moved on e.g. 50 for 120 GB SSD in 2015, 50 for 1000 GB SSD in 2023. Not only that, the life expectancy in terms of write cycles has increased to point where an average person could wear out a drive due to lots of write cycles.

    I write a lot of stuff to my nvme drives and have only used 10% of its nominal write cycle limits in just under 2 years. At this rate, the drive will outlast me LOL.

    I appreciate I am not directly helping to solve your main issue but the fact is your hdd is old, and will have a limited life expectancy.
    It could die tomorrow, or last another 10 years - who knows, but statistically 10 years is towards the upper end of life expectancy.

    As for it being slow at start, could be lots of reasons, failing hardware, other software interfering etc. Even if you solve that, drive will still be slow.

    Given your laptop is old, I would only invest in relatively cheap SSDs. They may not be top notch in performance but still several times faster than the fastest HDD.

    Trust me - once you start using SSDs, you will never want to use HDDS as your main drive ever again. Having said that HDDS are till useful for backups.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 184
    Windows 10 Pro x64 21H2
       #26

    Just reading the title and nothing else, it's because programs had to keep up with OS upgrades, i.e., Windows 7 to 8 to 10, meaning that an increase in the demand for resources from the OS demands more resources to be used to keep up with the OS. I feel like EVERYTHING read/writes to the HDD--even if it's some hardware that doesn't use the HDD, it still had to write its specs to the drive and install a driver, in some cases.
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 43
    Windows
       #27

    There are a lot of tweaks you can make to speed up boot times.

    1. Remove the splashscreen:

    Why HDD was fast back-in-the-day, but so slow today?-174351-1.png

    How to Disable the Windows Loading Splash Screen

    Your screen might be black for awhile longer than normal if you do this tweak, but it is nothing to be alarmed about.

    2. Having a blank solid colour background instead of a picture can help speed up boot time.

    Turn On or Off Desktop Background Image in Windows 10

    - - - Updated - - -

    3. Turn off background apps that you do not use. Usually I just turn off background applications altogether and have never once had an issue, but for examples of individual applications you might want to disable, 3D Viewer, calculator, etc.

    How to disable background apps in Windows 10 - TechEngage

    4. Turn off Startup Apps you do not use. Same method as you did to disable Microsoft Teams. I would leave any "official" looking applications alone i.e. Intel/AMD/Nvidia Control Panels, those might be necessary for your computers functionality - just keep to disabling 3rd party application that you could do without needing starting up everytime your turn your computer on, for instance Discord. General rule, if in doubt, leave it on.

    - - - Updated - - -

    SIW2 said:
    yes, I remember having that issue trying win10 on a mechanical disk. Disabling teams made a difference.
    It is shocking how they can make an application use so many resources, yet do so lacking so much functionality!

    While OP is at it, they could disable OneDrive from startup, which is installed on all "recent" version of Windows 10 from the get-go, and possibly via Windows Update on older versions - although they would need to make certain they are not using it for anything first.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 6,290
    Windows 11 Pro - Windows 7 HP - Lubuntu
       #28

    Sorry Fox Computers, your proposal can reduce only some seconds in 3 minutes.
    A SSD is around 6 times faster than a 5600 RPM HDD so it cuts boot times in same proportion, from 180 s to 30 s.
      My Computers


  9. Posts : 7,606
    Windows 10 Home 20H2
       #29

    Massarelda said:
     I timed it: it takes almost 10 minutes to boot. It has a WD 1-Tera HDD.
    Today, I replaced 【my dysfunctional HDD】 with a functional Seagate 7200-RPM HDD removed from an unused Lenovo desktop.
    Then, I clean installed Windows 10 Version 20H2 on it.
    Then, I ran the following script to measure the restart time:
    See Windows 11 Restart Time Tutorial | Windows 11 Forum

    It took 67 seconds to completely restart Windows as shown below:

    Why HDD was fast back-in-the-day, but so slow today?-restart-time.jpg
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 52
    Windows 22H2
    Thread Starter
       #30

    Matthew Wai said:
    Today, I replaced 【my dysfunctional HDD】 with a functional Seagate 7200-RPM HDD removed from an unused Lenovo desktop.
    Then, I clean installed Windows 10 Version 20H2 on it.
    Then, I ran the following script to measure the restart time:
    See Windows 11 Restart Time Tutorial | Windows 11 Forum

    It took 67 seconds to completely restart Windows as shown below:

    Why HDD was fast back-in-the-day, but so slow today?-restart-time.jpg
    Did you get all the latest Updates before measuring the boot time?

    - - - Updated - - -

    The last time I did a clean install of Windows, my BIOS's graphics chip was set to "switching" graphics. As I understanding that means, it will use both the discrete AMD Radeon as well as the integrated graphics chip in the i7 CPU. It will automatically switch to the AMD Radeon as necessary.

    I was getting frequently system lock-up. I suspected the AMD Radeon. So, I disabled the "switching" graphics thru the BIOS. So, now it will only use the integrated graphics chip. No more system lock up.

    I wonder if Windows is still looking for the AMD Radeon every time it boots?
      My Computer


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:06.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums