Unusually long boot time on PC that used to boot in seconds


  1. Posts : 381
    Windows 10
       #1

    Unusually long boot time on PC that used to boot in seconds


    I gave my old MSI X470 Gaming Plus Max and Ryzen 2700X to my partner when I upgraded last weekend. It is using the same 1 TB Crucial NVMe drive that I was using. No changes on hardware whatsoever. The only change was to clone the existing hard drive on the system to the new SSD. I have removed the original boot hard disk. All drivers are up to date.

    The problem is that from switch on to post is roughly about 100 seconds, according to task manager. When I power up, BIOS just sits there for 100 seconds with the hard disk light on (not flashing) before posting. Windows boots then and operates fine without issue. I have set BIOS to UEFI boot, and the SSD is the only drive in the machine. It's almost like the PC is looking for something while it is trying to post, but I can't figure out what it might be. The machine posted in seconds when I had it.

    Does anyone out there have any pointers on troubleshooting this?

    System specs:

    MSI X470 Gaming Plus Max motherboard
    Ryzen 2700X
    Crucial 1TB NVMe SSD
    16 GB GSkill 3200 memory, running at 2933
    Corsair TX750 power supply
    Radeon R9 280 graphics card
    Windows 10 x64 21H1

    Any assistance gratefully received.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 140
    Windows 10
       #2

    Does this long POST time also happen when you do a restart (warm boot) as well as a switch on (cold boot)?

    Is the power supply in your new PC the same power capacity as the power supply in your old PC?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 381
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Yes, warm boot or cold, there is no difference in the wait time.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 140
    Windows 10
       #4

    How do the power supplies in the two PCs compare? Any differences?
      My Computer

  5. Ghot's Avatar
    Posts : 15,766
    Win 10 Home 10.0.19044.1469 (x64) [21H2]
       #5

    Gurn Blanston said:
    Yes, warm boot or cold, there is no difference in the wait time.


    If I were you I'd make the free Macrium Reflect bootable Rescue Media.
    Then boot the computer from that, and choose the "Fix Boot problems" tool and follow the directions.

    If that doesn't fix the problem, then I would just do a clean install of Windows 10 on that machine.
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 381
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #6

    Eksy61 said:
    How do the power supplies in the two PCs compare? Any differences?
    The power supply is the same one that was used before. No hardware changes at all. I moved all of the system hardware into a new case, but left all hardware intact.


    @Ghot I'll give the Macrium thing a try later this evening. Thanks for the tip.
      My Computer

  7. MaloK's Avatar
    Posts : 1,438
    Windows 7 Pro
       #7

    Before excruciating this install, you can go to device manager, Select from View "Show Hidden devices", Then delete every ghosts device and it's current active counterparts eg: You have a quad core i7 but it shows a i5 and a i7 and you have 8 cores... Delete every CPUs... do the same for video, chipset, usb, hdd controllers... and everything else that look suspicious...

    Restart the computer... Let it reinstall devices and......................................... Restart it again.

    That would be my last resort before a clean install.
      My Computers

  8. spunk's Avatar
    Posts : 3,568
    Windows 11 Pro 64 Bit 21H2
       #8

    Boot into Setup (Bios) Go to the Boot tab, make sure the SSD is the first Boot device, remove any other boot devices. Or Set Bios to Defaults
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 381
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #9

    MaloK said:
    Before excruciating this install, you can go to device manager, Select from View "Show Hidden devices", Then delete every ghosts device and it's current active counterparts eg: You have a quad core i7 but it shows a i5 and a i7 and you have 8 cores... Delete every CPUs... do the same for video, chipset, usb, hdd controllers... and everything else that look suspicious...

    Restart the computer... Let it reinstall devices and......................................... Restart it again.

    That would be my last resort before a clean install.
    I will try this out, thanks.

    spunk said:
    Boot into Setup (Bios) Go to the Boot tab, make sure the SSD is the first Boot device, remove any other boot devices. Or Set Bios to Defaults
    Already did this. It didn't help, though. SSD is the only boot device. I have disabled everything else, including the CD/DVD.

    @Ghot Tried the Macrium repair thing. No joy, I'm afraid.
      My Computer

  10. spunk's Avatar
    Posts : 3,568
    Windows 11 Pro 64 Bit 21H2
       #10

    Download DiskGenius in my signature. Select your SSD and go to the toolbar to Disk/View SMART Information. Check the health of the Drive. You can also go to View or Repair Bad Sectors/Start Verify. If you have Bad Sectors, this will give you a map of them. If you have more then a couple you should replace the SSD.
      My Computer


 

  Related Discussions
Our Sites
Site Links
About Us
Windows 10 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 10" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 00:04.
Find Us




Windows 10 Forums