System Reserved (Drive) - How to remove?


  1. Posts : 9
    Windows 10
       #1

    System Reserved (Drive) - How to remove?


    This is for Windows 10 Version 10.0.19043 Build 19043

    I had forgotten the Administrator's password and tried the recovery disk to view it, but not to change it. It didn't work, but it left a System Reserved drive on my hard drive. I want to get rid of it. Two questions:

    1) Is that drive in a separate partition (abt 480 MB)?
    2) Is it safe to simply delete everything there but still allow the system to boot?
    3) How can I delete that drive/partition and get back the disk space?
      My Computer

  2. Berton's Avatar
    Posts : 11,991
    Win10 Pro Versions 2004 and 2009/20H2, Win10 Pro IP_Dev, Win10 Home 1909
       #2

    1. Open Disk Management and use Snip and Sketch to capture the window and post it here.
    2. Maybe, Maybe not. I'd leave it alone.
    3. At 480MB it is an insignificant amount of space, hardly worth messing with it.
      My Computers

  3. Try3's Avatar
    Posts : 9,740
    Windows 10 Home x64 Version 21H2 Build 19044.1348
       #3

    louarnold said:
    I had forgotten the Administrator's password and tried the recovery disk to view it, but not to change it.
    Windows does not allow any display of a user account's password.

    Are you referring to an Admin user account that you have created or to the built-in Admin that Windows created [& left disabled]?

    Denis
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 9
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #4

    System Reserved (Drive) - How to remove?-screenshot-2021-10-22-011657.png

    I would like to get rid of it nonetheless. The drives letters are all shifted down and I would have to find links and change them. Can you, in fact, help?
      My Computer

  5. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 16,588
    Windows 11 Pro
       #5

    From your screenshot in post #4 - assuming disk 0 is what you want to work on. You need a command prompt with admin privileges. Then the commands are:

    Code:
    diskpart
    select disk 0
    select part 1
    delete part override
    exit
    exit
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 9
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #6

    Try3 said:
    Windows does not allow any display of a user account's password.

    Are you referring to an Admin user account that you have created or to the built-in Admin that Windows created [& left disabled]?

    Denis
    I understand the question, but I forget what I did. I have already remembered the password and used it since. So that is solved.

    Note that there are tools pwDump.exe and John the Ripper that claim to display the current passwords, but I could not use them. The system threat software deleted these automatically when I downloaded them. However there appears to be malicious software in the system already vis. XMeters that I am still looking into.

    The recovery disk that I tried seems to have left alot of files on the system.:
    - The E drive as I mentioned
    - The C drive with "hiberfil.sys", (2021-10-22)
    ------(2021-10-19)"Boot" file, DumpStack.log.tmp
    ------(2021-05-09) bootTel.dat,
    ------(2016) bootmgr, BOOTNXT. I have never seen these before and always have the explorer show hidden system files.
    - In C:\Users\<user>\ several NTUSER.DAT(....) about 2020-06-09



    I note that the E drive has 5 files with dates ranging from 2021-10-19, back to 2018.

    - - - Updated - - -

    NavyLCDR said:
    From your screenshot in post #4 - assuming disk 0 is what you want to work on. You need a command prompt with admin privileges. Then the commands are:

    Code:
    diskpart
    select disk 0
    select part 1
    delete part override
    exit
    exit
    By these instructions, you are deleting a partition, and one that I may now be booting from. Would a system snapshot recovery process be a better idea?
      My Computer


  7. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 16,588
    Windows 11 Pro
       #7

    louarnold said:
    By these instructions, you are deleting a partition, and one that I may now be booting from. Would a system snapshot recovery process be a better idea?
    You need to make up your mind. In posts #1 and #4 you said you wanted to get rid of the system reserved partition. I told you how to get rid of it. Now you don't want to. So which is it? Your computer is booting from C: drive, not the System Reserved Partition that you so desperately wanted to get rid of before.
      My Computer


 

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