Performance and other power plans missing from my Power Panel.

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  1. Posts : 8
    Windows 10
       #1

    Performance and other power plans missing from my Power Panel.


    Sorry if I'm posting this in the wrong category, not sure where else I could post it.

    The issue is a few months ago all my power plans (including my custom ones) disappeared, the only one remaining is balanced. I'm running on a low end machine and want to use the High Performance plan to get maximum performance in a certain game, as well as improve my laptop's multitasking ability.
    I had the High Performance plan on just a few months ago and it suddenly removed itself from the power plan options, as well as plans such as power saver.
    Not too sure how to fix this, I've watched a few tutorials that use PowerShell as well as registry edits, and none of those seem to work. The other thing that I've seen on the internet is my power options being blocked by the OEM, meaning my laptop only has 1 plan it's capable of using, but I was able to use the other plans before, so I don't think this is the case.

    I'm looking for a permanent fix for this to get my power plans back.

    Thanks in advance.

    Specs of my laptop:
    - HP Envy 13 (model)
    -8 GB RAM
    -i5-10210U (CPU)
    -GPU: Intel UHD 620
    Running on Windows 10 (OS Build 19041.804)
      My Computer

  2. steve108's Avatar
    Posts : 13,124
    19041.1083 - 2004/20H1 Home x64
       #2

    Hello Ryuji and welcome to Tenforums ,
    Give this a try
    Restore Missing Default Power Plans in Windows 10
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 2,051
    Windows 10
       #3

    You can get back your Old Power Plans, but it will make no difference to performance in Games or anything else, like multi-tasking.

    By default there is one Balanced(recommended) plan, but you can create your own additional plans. On the left menu is "Create a power plan".

    I use one for a specific purpose in mind.

    If you click on the Battery Icon bottom right move that slider to the right "Best performance" that equates to the Old Plan. If you are (plugged in) it should say so just above the slider.
    You will find that even the central position "Better performance" is just as good. It still turbos up when required.
    I have tested for this.

    What will increase performance with integrated graphics is to increase the RAM from 8 GB to say 16 GB.
    On mine with an Application taking 1.8 GB of video memory out of the RAM, a ~5% to ~7 % increase in performance was measured with a RAM increase from 8 GB to 16 GB.
    That 1.8 GB is a smaller cut of the RAM thus more is available for other purposes.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 8
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #4

    Helmut said:
    You can get back your Old Power Plans, but it will make no difference to performance in Games or anything else, like multi-tasking.

    By default there is one Balanced(recommended) plan, but you can create your own additional plans. On the left menu is "Create a power plan".

    I use one for a specific purpose in mind.

    If you click on the Battery Icon bottom right move that slider to the right "Best performance" that equates to the Old Plan. If you are (plugged in) it should say so just above the slider.
    You will find that even the central position "Better performance" is just as good. It still turbos up when required.
    I have tested for this.

    What will increase performance with integrated graphics is to increase the RAM from 8 GB to say 16 GB.
    On mine with an Application taking 1.8 GB of video memory out of the RAM, a ~5% to ~7 % increase in performance was measured with a RAM increase from 8 GB to 16 GB.
    That 1.8 GB is a smaller cut of the RAM thus more is available for other purposes.
    I have already put the power slider all the way up to the maximum, that was a given. But I also want to be able to change the power processor states as well, from the default which I remember to be something like 35% for me to around 75-85%. As well as this, it would be very hard to increase my amount of RAM, as I'm on a laptop.

    - - - Updated - - -

    steve108 said:
    Hello Ryuji and welcome to Tenforums ,
    Give this a try
    Restore Missing Default Power Plans in Windows 10
    Thanks, I'm checking out the link now.

    - - - Updated - - -

    steve108 said:
    Hello Ryuji and welcome to Tenforums ,
    Give this a try
    Restore Missing Default Power Plans in Windows 10
    I was wondering if you had any alternate links/tutorials if this doesn't work? I've read quite a few articles that were like this and nothing really seemed to work for me.

    - - - Updated - - -

    steve108 said:
    Hello Ryuji and welcome to Tenforums ,
    Give this a try
    Restore Missing Default Power Plans in Windows 10
    Sorry to quote this message for the 3rd time within an hour, but I'd just like to tell you that I just attempted exactly what I've been asked to do on the site, using the cmd commands. Should I be restarting my computer right after entering these codes as well? Because I've tried doing this before and it doesn't seem to bring back the old plans. I'm not sure why this is happening to just me, none of my other friends with PCs or laptops seem to be having this issue either. Really strange that this is happening considering I had it before as well.
      My Computer

  5. steve108's Avatar
    Posts : 13,124
    19041.1083 - 2004/20H1 Home x64
       #5

    Yes, I would restart the PC always after issuing system modifications commands as here. Sorry, I don't have any other links for you. May have more suggestions later.
      My Computer

  6. hdmi's Avatar
    Posts : 480
    10 Home (21H1)
       #6

    By using a free program called ThrottleStop you can check if Speed Shift is enabled on the CPU. If the 'SST' is shown in green, it means enabled. The EPP number can be edited after you click on it. Lower numbers cause the CPU to ramp up its own clock speed more aggressively thus boosting performance, but at the sacrifice of consuming more power─thus resulting in more heat generation.

    Note that, as far as the specific part of power management that only applies to the CPU is concerned, Power Plans have no effect on it when Speed Shift is enabled. Specifically on 6th Gen, or Skylake Intel CPUs and up, Speed Shift replaces the older EIST (Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology). An improved 'version' of Speed Shift was later introduced with the arrival of 7th Gen, or Kaby Lake. Speed Shift v2: Speed Harder - Intel Launches 7th Generation Kaby Lake: 15W/28W with Iris, 35-91W Desktop and Mobile Xeon

    Also worth noting is that systems that support Modern Standby have typically only one Power Plan in Power Management of Windows 10. In which case, also typically, the Power Management tab in Device Manager will also be missing. By issuing the powercfg a command from a command window, you can check which type of Standby is supported by the system. There currently exist only these 2 different types:
    1. Standby (S3)
    2. Standby (S0 Low Power Idle)─also known as 'Modern Standby'

    They cannot both be supported at once. On some systems it is possible to disable Modern Standby in Windows 10 (20H2), by editing the Windows registry like follows:
    Code:
    reg add HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power /v PlatformAoAcOverride /t REG_DWORD /d 0
    (This setting does not take effect before the system will be restarted.)

    I should probably add that Modern Standby on some laptops (also including certain DELL laptops) reportedly had caused serious issues like draining the battery and heating the laptop, with the lid closed, to insane temperatures in a laptop carrying bag. Lucky for me, on my new Medion laptop I was able to apply the above registry hack, and that also brought back the missing Power Plans and brought back the missing Power Management tab in my Device Manager on my Windows 10─20H2.
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 8
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #7

    hdmi said:
    By using a free program called ThrottleStop you can check if Speed Shift is enabled on the CPU. If the 'SST' is shown in green, it means enabled. The EPP number can be edited after you click on it. Lower numbers cause the CPU to ramp up its own clock speed more aggressively thus boosting performance, but at the sacrifice of consuming more power─thus resulting in more heat generation.

    Note that, as far as the specific part of power management that only applies to the CPU is concerned, Power Plans have no effect on it when Speed Shift is enabled. Specifically on 6th Gen, or Skylake Intel CPUs and up, Speed Shift replaces the older EIST (Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology). An improved 'version' of Speed Shift was later introduced with the arrival of 7th Gen, or Kaby Lake. Speed Shift v2: Speed Harder - Intel Launches 7th Generation Kaby Lake: 15W/28W with Iris, 35-91W Desktop and Mobile Xeon

    Also worth noting is that systems that support Modern Standby have typically only one Power Plan in Power Management of Windows 10. In which case, also typically, the Power Management tab in Device Manager will also be missing. By issuing the powercfg a command from a command window, you can check which type of Standby is supported by the system. There currently exist only these 2 different types:
    1. Standby (S3)
    2. Standby (S0 Low Power Idle)─also known as 'Modern Standby'

    They cannot both be supported at once. On some systems it is possible to disable Modern Standby in Windows 10 (20H2), by editing the Windows registry like follows:
    Code:
    reg add HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power /v PlatformAoAcOverride /t REG_DWORD /d 0
    (This setting does not take effect before the system will be restarted.)

    I should probably add that Modern Standby on some laptops (also including certain DELL laptops) reportedly had caused serious issues like draining the battery and heating the laptop, with the lid closed, to insane temperatures in a laptop carrying bag. Lucky for me, on my new Medion laptop I was able to apply the above registry hack, and that also brought back the missing Power Plans and brought back the missing Power Management tab in my Device Manager on my Windows 10─20H2.
    Hey! Thanks for the detailed reply, the program that you recommended to me already seems to enable my High Performance power plan without it being in my Control Panel. I was just wondering, how low do you think I can go with my EPP number to get the best performance without ruining my laptop? (The default was 128)

    - - - Updated - - -

    hdmi said:
    By using a free program called ThrottleStop you can check if Speed Shift is enabled on the CPU. If the 'SST' is shown in green, it means enabled. The EPP number can be edited after you click on it. Lower numbers cause the CPU to ramp up its own clock speed more aggressively thus boosting performance, but at the sacrifice of consuming more power─thus resulting in more heat generation.

    Note that, as far as the specific part of power management that only applies to the CPU is concerned, Power Plans have no effect on it when Speed Shift is enabled. Specifically on 6th Gen, or Skylake Intel CPUs and up, Speed Shift replaces the older EIST (Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology). An improved 'version' of Speed Shift was later introduced with the arrival of 7th Gen, or Kaby Lake. Speed Shift v2: Speed Harder - Intel Launches 7th Generation Kaby Lake: 15W/28W with Iris, 35-91W Desktop and Mobile Xeon

    Also worth noting is that systems that support Modern Standby have typically only one Power Plan in Power Management of Windows 10. In which case, also typically, the Power Management tab in Device Manager will also be missing. By issuing the powercfg a command from a command window, you can check which type of Standby is supported by the system. There currently exist only these 2 different types:
    1. Standby (S3)
    2. Standby (S0 Low Power Idle)─also known as 'Modern Standby'

    They cannot both be supported at once. On some systems it is possible to disable Modern Standby in Windows 10 (20H2), by editing the Windows registry like follows:
    Code:
    reg add HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power /v PlatformAoAcOverride /t REG_DWORD /d 0
    (This setting does not take effect before the system will be restarted.)

    I should probably add that Modern Standby on some laptops (also including certain DELL laptops) reportedly had caused serious issues like draining the battery and heating the laptop, with the lid closed, to insane temperatures in a laptop carrying bag. Lucky for me, on my new Medion laptop I was able to apply the above registry hack, and that also brought back the missing Power Plans and brought back the missing Power Management tab in my Device Manager on my Windows 10─20H2.
    Just one more query, should I click the 'Turn on' button? Whenever I do, the symbol in my Taskbar becomes red, and when it's supposedly 'off' the symbol is green. Does the 'Turn on' button actually activate the program? Or is it something else.
      My Computer

  8. hdmi's Avatar
    Posts : 480
    10 Home (21H1)
       #8

    Ryuji said:
    Hey! Thanks for the detailed reply, the program that you recommended to me already seems to enable my High Performance power plan without it being in my Control Panel. I was just wondering, how low do you think I can go with my EPP number to get the best performance without ruining my laptop? (The default was 128)

    - - - Updated - - -



    Just one more query, should I click the 'Turn on' button? Whenever I do, the symbol in my Taskbar becomes red, and when it's supposedly 'off' the symbol is green. Does the 'Turn on' button actually activate the program? Or is it something else.

    Laptop manufacturers generally set the BD PROCHOT flag to enabled, as doing this is what allows them to use the PROCHOT offset in order to dictate how high the CPU temp can go before the CPU starts throttling itself down. They do this for a variety of reasons one of which is that letting the CPU reach to 100C before it finally shuts off isn't the brightest idea, even, if the cooling system is up to snuff. The PROCHOT offset has to be a negative number, as it is an offset that is relative to the base number of 100C so, for example, if the offset equals -12, then CPU throttling starts after 88C has been exceeded.

    Another fact is that setting BD PROCHOT to enabled also allows other hardware components to trigger CPU throttling, which isn't necessarily always a bad thing, either.

    Depending on the design implementation of the laptop in question, letting the CPU run excessively hot might inflict permanent damage to other sensitive intestines of the laptop, due to how heat energy propagates from the CPU onto them. This is relevant especially in thin-size laptops where interior space used to let airflow keep localized heat buildups─in areas that surround the CPU─mitigated tends to be more limited. Also in addition to this, in laptops with a dedicated GPU, the CPU and GPU might share the same heatsink because it is a design choice that specifically can help to reduce laptop's overall size, weight, and cooling fan battery power consumption.

    As for the Speed Shift EPP number and the resulting temperatures that you can experiment. Use Real Temp to monitor the sensors, after which you can then decide on whether you want your laptop rare, medium, or well done.

    - - - Updated - - -

    The Turn On/Off button in ThrottleStop should no longer be required. If your BIOS doesn't automatically enable Speed Shift, then you could decide to add a task in Task Scheduler to make ThrottleStop run at system startup─and make sure that Speed Shift is set to enabled in ThrottleStop and you have saved the settings in ThrottleStop.
      My Computers

  9. Chrysalis's Avatar
    Posts : 210
    Win 10 1809 LTSC
       #9

    On my laptop I have this issue, and the registry change didnt do anything, but as others have said you can create new power plans and they will show.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 8
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #10

    hdmi said:
    Laptop manufacturers generally set the BD PROCHOT flag to enabled, as doing this is what allows them to use the PROCHOT offset in order to dictate how high the CPU temp can go before the CPU starts throttling itself down. They do this for a variety of reasons one of which is that letting the CPU reach to 100C before it finally shuts off isn't the brightest idea, even, if the cooling system is up to snuff. The PROCHOT offset has to be a negative number, as it is an offset that is relative to the base number of 100C so, for example, if the offset equals -12, then CPU throttling starts after 88C has been exceeded.

    Another fact is that setting BD PROCHOT to enabled also allows other hardware components to trigger CPU throttling, which isn't necessarily always a bad thing, either.

    Depending on the design implementation of the laptop in question, letting the CPU run excessively hot might inflict permanent damage to other sensitive intestines of the laptop, due to how heat energy propagates from the CPU onto them. This is relevant especially in thin-size laptops where interior space used to let airflow keep localized heat buildups─in areas that surround the CPU─mitigated tends to be more limited. Also in addition to this, in laptops with a dedicated GPU, the CPU and GPU might share the same heatsink because it is a design choice that specifically can help to reduce laptop's overall size, weight, and cooling fan battery power consumption.

    As for the Speed Shift EPP number and the resulting temperatures that you can experiment. Use Real Temp to monitor the sensors, after which you can then decide on whether you want your laptop rare, medium, or well done.

    - - - Updated - - -

    The Turn On/Off button in ThrottleStop should no longer be required. If your BIOS doesn't automatically enable Speed Shift, then you could decide to add a task in Task Scheduler to make ThrottleStop run at system startup─and make sure that Speed Shift is set to enabled in ThrottleStop and you have saved the settings in ThrottleStop.
    Right, thanks. I'll do some experimenting and I'll gradually lower the Shift EPP number to see what works best in terms of balance between power consumption and performance. Just one more question, sorry. I have a program called Process Lasso constantly on in the background, should I have it shut down to allow ThrottleStop to run at full capability? Or should it be fine for the most part?
      My Computer


 
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