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  1.    14 Mar 2017 #11
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,486
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    @cwburns32, the corners of those fans can be removed easily. They just slip on and are there as anti vibration pads. I removed the ones on my radiator too. Also, pay attention to what Kipper says. He knows.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  2.    14 Mar 2017 #12
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,486
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    You may want to consider reapplying thermal paste. This will show you how, in case you don't know.

      My ComputersSystem Spec
  3.    14 Mar 2017 #13
    Join Date : Mar 2017
    Posts : 40
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter

    Quote Originally Posted by essenbe View Post
    @cwburns32, the corners of those fans can be removed easily. They just slip on and are there as anti vibration pads. I removed the ones on my radiator too. Also, pay attention to what Kipper says. He knows.
    Wow, that is awesome to hear! What do you run yours at while gaming under load, idling, etc? I am going to buy 2 right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by essenbe View Post
    You may want to consider reapplying thermal paste. This will show you how, in case you don't know.

    I do know how but thanks for this. It's been a while and always nice to get a reminder. Thanks again for all the help.
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  4.    15 Mar 2017 #14
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,486
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    For normal usage, as well as gaming I usually run the fans around 1800-1900. I will turn them up when stress testing or benchmarking. They can be fairly loud turned way up, but not so much when turned down. Any fan that turns 3000 RPMs will be loud, but turned down they aren't bad at all. They will put out over 100 CFM of air turned way up, and have quite high static pressure. Dude steered to right about these fans.
    Last edited by essenbe; 15 Mar 2017 at 17:19.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  5.    15 Mar 2017 #15
    Join Date : Nov 2013
    Houston
    Posts : 2,110
    3-Win-7Prox64 2-Win10Prox64

    Hi,
    I use the bottom and front as intakes and the top and top rear fan as exhaust works well
    Bottom and front have filters already plus I made some real filters with a/c filter material for micro dust

    But looking at your case with that huge psu you'd be better off putting the radiator on top and using it as a intake
    The psu will pull air from inside the case and exhaust it so that is why you'd be better off using the front as an exhaust too.

    I just ordered a twin pack of ML140's to see what they are like on my rad.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  6.    15 Mar 2017 #16
    Join Date : Mar 2017
    Posts : 40
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter

    Quote Originally Posted by essenbe View Post
    For normal usage, as well as gaming I usually run the fans around 1800-1900. I will turn them up when stress testing or benchmarking. They can be fairly loud turned way up, but not so much when turned down. Any fan that turns 3000 RPMs will be loud, but turned down they aren't bad at all. They will put out over 100 CFM of air turned way up, and have quite high static pressure. Dude steered to right about these fans.
    I have the Noctua fans ordered. Currently the SP120s that come with rad range from 1300-1800 depending on idle/load. I flipped my 140s on top to intake and set them at 1000 with the exhaust at 800. I still need to fuss with it I think but will wait to other fans come in for now. I'm curious though....with GPU shroud blowing warm into cage + rad blowing warm air into cage and the top fans set to intake (at a faster rate than the single exhaust on the back) will the warm air just be moved around inside the case? I am guessing I need to do a smoke test to see if holes near bottom of cage are drawing air in, pushing air out or neither to best understand what's going on with this new config.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThrashZone View Post
    Hi,
    I use the bottom and front as intakes and the top and top rear fan as exhaust works well
    Bottom and front have filters already plus I made some real filters with a/c filter material for micro dust

    But looking at your case with that huge psu you'd be better off putting the radiator on top and using it as a intake
    The psu will pull air from inside the case and exhaust it so that is why you'd be better off using the front as an exhaust too.

    I just ordered a twin pack of ML140's to see what they are like on my rad.
    Bottom? And I just flipped my top fans to intake (fronts are also intake) with the single exhaust on the back but am going to toy with it for the next while here. The PSU will draw air out of the case even with that shroud? I'd imagine if it does, it isn't much? There is an HDD down below in the front underneath the rad so it may draw some of that air out...but I could be wrong.

    I assume you are suggesting rad as intake because it will blow warm air down towards the PSU that will draw it out? That is an idea but it'd be blowing on top of the open air shroud (which is blowing warm air into cage) and the 1080 is a very large card and then the PSU shroud. I can't imagine the PSU drawing much of this airflow out of the cage with all that going on...but again I could be wrong.

    Let me know your thoughts?
      My ComputerSystem Spec
  7.    15 Mar 2017 #17
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,486
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    See if this helps show what positive airflow is. The air coming through the rad is only about 3 warmer than the air coming in. No big deal. The fan on the PSU is an intake fan to keep the PSU cool. It exhausts out the back of the case. I always install my PSU with the fan facing down, if you have a filter below it. Cooler air and helps when you drop a screw. In the video below, things are more pronounced with the side on as everything in the case is contained so the air flow is more directed while closed up, but this is a good demo.

      My ComputersSystem Spec
  8.    15 Mar 2017 #18
    Join Date : Nov 2013
    Houston
    Posts : 2,110
    3-Win-7Prox64 2-Win10Prox64

    Hi,
    I didn't say so but Steve did that the radiator would be best on the top so cooler intake air would come through it
    That would clear way for straight forward exhaust out the front

    Your psu has many holes on the top so under load it would pull air through it and exhaust out the back
    Attachment 125312
    But if you don't have room for the rad on top to intake through it you're sort of stuck with it as is

    I sort of like a balanced intake exhaust system it is more efficient I believe
    I do have more air pulling out than I have pulling in at the moment the ML140's might change that a tad.
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  9.    15 Mar 2017 #19
    Join Date : Oct 2013
    NW Florida
    Posts : 9,486
    Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro/Windows 7 Enterprise/Linux Mint

    Mike, maybe I don't understand exactly what you are saying, but you would be hurting yourself exhausting air out of the front and rear. The basic rule is to have the airflow running in 1 direction, in the overwhelming majority of cases, in the front and out the rear. That video demonstrates the number of gaps in the case and the flow of air. Even with the rear fan completely removed, it still flows pretty aggressively in the front and out the rear. So, maybe I don't understand you but I would never exhaust out the front. You would be creating a situation where air circulates within the case instead of exiting. Did I miss something?
      My ComputersSystem Spec
  10.    15 Mar 2017 #20
    Join Date : Mar 2017
    Posts : 40
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter

    Quote Originally Posted by essenbe View Post
    See if this helps show what positive airflow is. The air coming through the rad is only about 3 warmer than the air coming in. No big deal. The fan on the PSU is an intake fan to keep the PSU cool. It exhausts out the back of the case. I always install my PSU with the fan facing down, if you have a filter below it. Cooler air and helps when you drop a screw. In the video below, things are more pronounced with the side on as everything in the case is contained so the air flow is more directed while closed up, but this is a good demo.
    I figured this was the concept but good visual. This PSU has a fan on the back that blows out of the case and the fan is on the bottom. There is a removable filter underneath. Thanks for sharing vid.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThrashZone View Post
    Hi,
    I didn't say so but Steve did that the radiator would be best on the top so cooler intake air would come through it
    That would clear way for straight forward exhaust out the front

    Your psu has many holes on the top so under load it would pull air through it and exhaust out the back
    Attachment 125312
    But if you don't have room for the rad on top to intake through it you're sort of stuck with it as is

    I sort of like a balanced intake exhaust system it is more efficient I believe
    I do have more air pulling out than I have pulling in at the moment the ML140's might change that a tad.
    My PSU does not have many holes on it. That is the PSU shroud, the PSU underneath is actually completely sealed. Fan is on bottom with removable filter in front of it. Is this what you meant by intake from bottom?

    Exhaust out the front? Are you saying to flip the rad to top as intake, keep back as exhaust and set front 2 140mms to exhaust? There's an idea I hadn't thought of but exhausting out both front and back is this efficient? I would think all the components in the middle of the case would not get much airflow? Just thinking out loud hear.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

 
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