Windows 10: Laptop wifi slow, very fast at work, other devices are fast at home


  1. Posts : 4
    Windows 10 (64-bit)
       26 Aug 2015 #1

    Laptop wifi slow, very fast at work, other devices are fast at home


    Ever since upgrading to Windows 10, my Lenovo laptop has experienced paralyzingly-slow home WiFi performance. To test if it was my ISP or laptop, I looked at my wife's laptop in a performance test at the same distance away from my router, with all other home devices on airplane mode. Note: We use AT&T Uverse as our ISP.


    • Wife PC (Chrome) - 17 Mbps
    • Wife PC (Firefox) - 15.2 Mbps
    • My PC (Firefox) - 7.2 Mbps
    • My PC (Chrome) - 3 Mbps


    At work, the same speed test (Ookla) run from the same server as my home tests (Duke University) showed 180 Mbps. I'll go through, from my rather inexperienced perspective, various settings I would imagine might be relevant to diagnosing.

    Boxes in "Network Properties" that are checked under "This connection uses the following items:"
    [x] Client for Microsoft Networks
    [x] File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
    [x] QoS Packet Scheduler
    [x] Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)
    [ ] Link-Layer Topology Discovery Mapper I/O Driver
    [ ] Microsoft Network Adapter Multiplexor Protocol
    [ ] Microsoft LLDP Protocol Driver
    [x] Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6}
    [x] Link-Layer Topology Discovery Responder

    Wi-Fi Status

    IPv4 Connectivity: Internet
    IPv6 Connectivity: Internet
    Media State: Enabled
    SSID: <Name of Network>
    Speed: 54.0 Mbps
    Signal Quality (at time of writing): [4 of 5 bars]
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    26 Aug 2015 #2

    doorguote said: View Post
    Ever since upgrading to Windows 10, my Lenovo laptop has experienced paralyzingly-slow home WiFi performance. To test if it was my ISP or laptop, I looked at my wife's laptop in a performance test at the same distance away from my router, with all other home devices on airplane mode. Note: We use AT&T Uverse as our ISP.


    • Wife PC (Chrome) - 17 Mbps
    • Wife PC (Firefox) - 15.2 Mbps
    • My PC (Firefox) - 7.2 Mbps
    • My PC (Chrome) - 3 Mbps


    At work, the same speed test (Ookla) run from the same server as my home tests (Duke University) showed 180 Mbps. I'll go through, from my rather inexperienced perspective, various settings I would imagine might be relevant to diagnosing.

    Boxes in "Network Properties" that are checked under "This connection uses the following items:"
    [x] Client for Microsoft Networks
    [x] File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
    [x] QoS Packet Scheduler
    [x] Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)
    [ ] Link-Layer Topology Discovery Mapper I/O Driver
    [ ] Microsoft Network Adapter Multiplexor Protocol
    [ ] Microsoft LLDP Protocol Driver
    [x] Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6}
    [x] Link-Layer Topology Discovery Responder

    Wi-Fi Status

    IPv4 Connectivity: Internet
    IPv6 Connectivity: Internet
    Media State: Enabled
    SSID: <Name of Network>
    Speed: 54.0 Mbps
    Signal Quality (at time of writing): [4 of 5 bars]
    Are you connected to a 2.4 GHz network at home? Bluetooth devices and some USB 3.0 devices plugged into a laptop's USB 3.0 port will create interference with your wifi. My bluetooth keyboard/mouse will halve my wifi speed. Add a usb 3.0 external hard drive and sometimes my wifi disconnects during peak transfer.

    What WiFi security protocols are being used at home vs at work?
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  3.    26 Aug 2015 #3

    5 GHz band is the solution to this problem.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4.    27 Aug 2015 #4

    theveterans said: View Post
    5 GHz band is the solution to this problem.
    Not sure if this is directed to my post as I've already moved to 5 GHz to fix it. It hasn't been established yet that it's the OP's issue. I 'm just suggesting the interference as the source.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  5. Posts : 4
    Windows 10 (64-bit)
    Thread Starter
       27 Aug 2015 #5

    theveterans said: View Post
    5 GHz band is the solution to this problem.
    I am not sure where to specifically see if I'm connected to 2.4 or 5 GHz band, but followed an online suggestion and ran the following in my command prompt

    netsh wlan show all

    The result for my network:

    SSID 2 : 2WIRE477
    Network type : Infrastructure
    Authentication : WPA2-Personal
    Encryption : CCMP
    BSSID 1 : 74:9d:dc:1f:b2:11
    Signal : 99%
    Radio type : 802.11g
    Channel : 6
    Basic rates (Mbps) : 1 2 5.5 11
    Other rates (Mbps) : 6 9 12 18 24 36 48 54

    Does this point out anything obvious to you guys?
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  6. Posts : 4
    Windows 10 (64-bit)
    Thread Starter
       27 Aug 2015 #6

    sciencegeek said: View Post
    Not sure if this is directed to my post as I've already moved to 5 GHz to fix it. It hasn't been established yet that it's the OP's issue. I 'm just suggesting the interference as the source.
    Thanks for the suggestion, but I do not have any competing bluetooth frequencies as possible interference. Also, no wireless home phone line to interfere.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  7.    27 Aug 2015 #7

    You're on 802.11g so 2.4GzHz.

    If your WiFi driver allows it, could try matching modes. That helped in some cases. Right click on the Start button, select Network Connections, right click on the wi-fi icon, select Properties, click on Configure, click on Advanced tab. You'll see a list of configurable properties. Depending on the driver, hopefully there is one to select "mode". Try setting that to g only to see if that helps.
      My ComputerSystem Spec


  8. Posts : 4
    Windows 10 (64-bit)
    Thread Starter
       30 Aug 2015 #8

    sciencegeek said: View Post
    You're on 802.11g so 2.4GzHz.

    If your WiFi driver allows it, could try matching modes. That helped in some cases. Right click on the Start button, select Network Connections, right click on the wi-fi icon, select Properties, click on Configure, click on Advanced tab. You'll see a list of configurable properties. Depending on the driver, hopefully there is one to select "mode". Try setting that to g only to see if that helps.
    I did that suggestion, speed-testing "b", "b/g", and "g". I also recorded the "speed" value under the "General" box of the "WiFi Status" window under Network Properties.

    • B: Ookla tested at 6.07 up, 1.9 down. "Speed" = 11.0 Mbps
    • B/G: Ookla tested at 13.76 up, 1.9 down. "Speed" = 54.0 Mbps
    • G: Ookla tested at 15.1 up, 1.9 down. "Speed" = 54.0 Mbps


    Does that seem to be the only thing I should check, do you think?



      My ComputerSystem Spec


 

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