Which is Better? Separate Modem & Router or Modem-router?

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  1. yahanna's Avatar
    Posts : 533
    10
       #1

    Which is Better? Separate Modem & Router or Modem-router?


    Which is better? having an all in one modem-router or a separate modem and router?

    I wanna make sure I dont experience any reboots and to have consistently high speeds for 4K viewing on my roku.
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  2. bobkn's Avatar
    Posts : 4,166
    Win 11 Pro 22000.282
       #2

    Shouldn't matter, as long as the modem and router can handle the bandwidth.

    I used a modem with voice plus a separate wireless router, but I had to switch to a Comcast xFinity AX7 gateway to get their fastest data rate (1200Mbps down), voice over IP (Comcast's), and a greater than 1Gbps connection to my PC. The good news is that the rental cost for that is no more than their lesser modems. The connection to the PC was the sticking point; the modems I looked at had a single 2.5Gbps output, and wireless routers usually had a 2.5Gbps input with no wired outputs above 1Gbps. (There may be exceptions, but they are expensive.)
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  3. Berton's Avatar
    Posts : 11,963
    Win10 Pro Versions 2004 and 2009/20H2, Win10 Pro IP_Dev, Win10 Home 1909
       #3

    I use a Netgear Wireless Nighthawk Router plus an 8-port Gigabit Switch for my network and an ISP-provided PoE Modem for 25 Mbps Wireless DSL. I've not yet come across a combo PoE Modem/Router [really not looking very hard for one], most seem to be phoneline DSL or Cable/Broadband.
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  4. NavyLCDR's Avatar
    Posts : 16,573
    Windows 11 Pro
       #4

    I use a separate modem (that I own, not rented from the ISP) and router. The reason is that I can upgrade one or the other more cheaply than having to upgrade both at the same time. And, actually, the modem that I use is also a router, including WiFi, but I have it set to bridge mode so the router portion is disabled.
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  5. Posts : 1,378
    X
       #5

    Get the combined modem/router. One piece of gear doing the job of two is better. And cheaper. And less equipment to fail.
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  6. yahanna's Avatar
    Posts : 533
    10
    Thread Starter
       #6

    Hi guys.. just a couple of things to clarify...

    I bought an all-in-one wifi-modem-router so I dont have to rent spectrum's equipment. I also have a spectrum modem for phone only.

    Also I forgot to mention that spectrum sent me a spectrum wifi router. All I need is a modem for it. That being the case, what must I do to each of these devices to avoid issues like double nating and how to put them in bridge mode?

    Looking forward to your replies.
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  7. Samuria's Avatar
    Posts : 6,554
    windows 10
       #7

    The key difference is a modem generally doesnt have nat so its live ip on the net just right for hackers, if you then have a router the connection between to 2 is subject to noise if its one unit router there is no wires to get extra noise
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  8. MaloK's Avatar
    Posts : 993
    Windows 7
       #8

    Also Since all components are internal, Communication between them is often much faster then most Ethernet networks.
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  9. cereberus's Avatar
    Posts : 12,627
    Windows10
       #9

    In the UK, vast majority of routers provided by ISPs are integrated modem/routers and it is hard to buy anything else. Worse, some ISP routers lockdown DNS servers to the ISP's own DNS which can block some sites (Teamviewer gets blocked by Talk Talk).

    I get round this by connecting a (spare) second router LAN to LAN via ethernet cable (static IP in same subnet) and setting DNS on second router to a preferred DNS Server.

    So I end up with two integrated modem/router sets just to get round ISP constraints!
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  10. MaloK's Avatar
    Posts : 993
    Windows 7
       #10

    cereberus said:
    In the UK, vast majority of routers provided by ISPs are integrated modem/routers and it is hard to buy anything else. Worse, some ISP routers lockdown DNS servers to the ISP's own DNS which can block some sites (Teamviewer gets blocked by Talk Talk).

    I get round this by connecting a (spare) second router LAN to LAN via ethernet cable (static IP in same subnet) and setting DNS on second router to a preferred DNS Server.

    So I end up with two integrated modem/router sets just to get round ISP constraints!
    Hi Cereberus,

    From your description, You should be able to set your dns directly in windows TCp/IP config without the need of a secondary dns server...

    Do these routers have a bridge mode or DMZ function ? If yes you could get yourself a fat gaming router and use the pos as a modem instead, and override global dns settings from there...
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