SMBv1 and Windows 10 (network attached storage)

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  1. Posts : 72
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #21

    Railtech said:
    The issue is and always will be how SAMBA (the Linux equivalent of SMB) handles network discovery. Almost all of the NAS devices on the market use a Linux based OS (which uses SAMBA). Manufacturers of these devices simply use whatever version of SAMBA that works with their OS with little concern about how the user interacts with the device.

    For the most part it is expected that users will map drive letters to these NAS devices to have access. Doing that is very similar to using a mapped location. So my question to you is, what about that do you not like?

    Switching to a different NAS brand is no guarantee that your situation will change, in fact, it is likely nothing will change as far as access to the device goes. Reality is that just because you cannot see these devices in Explorer does not mean that they do not or will not function, it only means that the user needs to adapt to a new way of working with the devices. As I said before, the most effective way I have found is the mapped location method. I do not use mapped drive letters as I find them to be unreliable for my purposes. I run multiple machines on my LAN that require access to my NAS devices so having access via mapped location allows for that where a mapped drive letter does not.

    You can force an NAS device to appear in the traditional way, showing under Network in the Navigation column of Explorer by selecting Network and then typing the path in the address field in Explorer. Example below:

    Attachment 319938

    The above example should work for your Drobo the same way. The Synology device you link to would also be the same way.
    Would I need a user name/password to access the Drobo? I use one now and I would like to keep that feature.

    Here is a list of Network protocols for the Synology.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails SMBv1 and Windows 10 (network attached storage)-drobo.png  
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  2. Posts : 494
    Win 10 Pro x64 versions
       #22

    HarryD,

    Your shares can be (and probably are already given your statement) password protected when creating a mapped location. As stated previously, a mapped location is basically a shortcut to your network share on the device. During creation of the mapped location, if the share being mapped is password protected then you will be prompted to enter credentials for the shortcut. You will have the option of allowing Windows to remember those credentials or not. If you chose not to have them remembered, then every time you click on the shortcut the credentials prompt will appear.

    The specs on the Synology device are okay, nothing spectacular but good among the consumer class devices. I have no idea what specs are on the Drobo 5N however, since it is a bit older device I am sure this Synology is a good deal ahead of it. Nonetheless, you will need to do some configuration of the Synology to make it discoverable on your Windows network.

    First, the Synology device must be running firmware DSM 6.2-22259 which offers support for the WS-Discovery service which can facilitate the ability to have the device show up in Explorer. In addition, you will need to configure the device during setup to locate the WS-Discovery service option in the Control Panel of the device and then enable the "Windows network discovery to allow file access via SMB to get things working. Having said that the above only applies to IPv4, if you are using IPv6 this does not apply and you are back to where you are now with this issue.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 72
    Windows 10
    Thread Starter
       #23

    Railtech said:
    HarryD,

    Your shares can be (and probably are already given your statement) password protected when creating a mapped location. As stated previously, a mapped location is basically a shortcut to your network share on the device. During creation of the mapped location, if the share being mapped is password protected then you will be prompted to enter credentials for the shortcut. You will have the option of allowing Windows to remember those credentials or not. If you chose not to have them remembered, then every time you click on the shortcut the credentials prompt will appear.

    The specs on the Synology device are okay, nothing spectacular but good among the consumer class devices. I have no idea what specs are on the Drobo 5N however, since it is a bit older device I am sure this Synology is a good deal ahead of it. Nonetheless, you will need to do some configuration of the Synology to make it discoverable on your Windows network.

    First, the Synology device must be running firmware DSM 6.2-22259 which offers support for the WS-Discovery service which can facilitate the ability to have the device show up in Explorer. In addition, you will need to configure the device during setup to locate the WS-Discovery service option in the Control Panel of the device and then enable the "Windows network discovery to allow file access via SMB to get things working. Having said that the above only applies to IPv4, if you are using IPv6 this does not apply and you are back to where you are now with this issue.
    I am using IPv4. To use it how I have it right now, will I have to create a mapped location for each folder that's on the Drobo?
    I have three Drobo 5N's. The first one has multiple folders. The second and third have one folder each.

    That's why I was looking at the 8 drive Synology (with the number of drives I currently own). If we ever get the Covid money I think I'll be buying one.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 1,203
    11 Home
       #24

    HarryD said:
    I've read through his fix and realized that all it does is enable SMBv1. I can do that quite easily but I'm looking for another solution. If the Drobo's rely on SMB but version 1 is disabled on the Drobo, the problem has to lie within Windows.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Maybe I'd be better off looking for a new NAS?

    Synology 4 Bay NAS DiskStation DS418 (Diskless) - Newegg.com
    Here is another possible solution, but I'm not sure if the Drobo can be tweaked in such a way that it will run Christgau's wsdd service. Using WS-Discovery to enable Windows 10 to browse SMB shares in my home network of Linux computers | Fitzcarraldo's Blog

    That said, NAS solutions very often tend to be more expensive compared to building your own server pod. The latter choice requires a bit more work, but when it comes to added functionalities that you might need, you highly reduce the risk of bumping into a brick wall.
      My Computers


  5. Posts : 18,428
    Windows 11 Pro
       #25

    HarryD said:
    That's why I was looking at the 8 drive Synology (with the number of drives I currently own). If we ever get the Covid money I think I'll be buying one.
    I would look at building your own server. TrueNAS core is free and much more capable than a NAS box. Mine is running on an older AMD FX computer and it functions as a file server, a Plex media server, and currently runs Windows 10 in a VM but, of course, will run Linux in a VM as well.

    SMBv1 and Windows 10 (network attached storage)-capture.jpg
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  6. Posts : 13,967
    Win10 Pro and Home, Win11 Pro and Home, Win7, Linux Mint
       #26

    I did my 2 WD MyCloud 2TB NAS drives differently, both are connected via Ethernet cable to the Router. I can access the data on them if they are seen in File Explorer's Network section then I Map the Public folder on them, can do it from any computer whether Wired or Wireless. One advantage for me is no one computer has to remain on for them to be useful.
      My Computers


  7. Posts : 11,247
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #27

    Hi folks

    I really hate these "Proprietary NAS systems" when a simple Linux box would do it all.

    If you can set SAMBA (some of these hideous proprietary NAS boxes might let you get into the SAMBA system if that's what they use (and probably generally do) then simply edit the samba config file --usually it's a text file in /etc/samba/smb.conf.

    Then make these changes :

    in the [Global] section :


    [global]
    min protocol = NT1 #This allows SMBV1 for older protocols -- ensure your W10 system also enables SMBV1
    Also if you have any XP systems that need to access large multi TB HDD;s then also add these lines :

    lanman auth=yes
    ntlm auth=yes


    I'm always amazed why people go for expensve proprietary QNAP or other NAS systems -- a basic Linux OS on even old hardware (probably on a one way trip to the tip) would be infinitely better value (and performance -- you can run a Linux system in as little as 512Kb of memory !!!) and also you can install what you like on it etc etc.

    Any old cheap piece of kit will run a Linux OS -- good as a server and save you oodles of dosh (and hassle). Even run one as a VM if needs must. !!

    Note to share with old protocol you need to use NT1 in the SAMBA file !! I know it's not intuitive but SAMBA changed a while ago so it's now NT1 (and set as MIN protocol so other more modern stuff can use SMBV2/3 etc).

    Here's a complete SAMBA file from one of my NAS boxes -- it's on a LAN and please don't say "security" - Linux is good enough and this box has far better basic security than even the most up to date W10 stuff -- even though WD is now excellent.



    #======================= Global Settings =====================================

    [global]
    min protocol = NT1
    # can set it to SMB2 if you want experimental SMB2 support.
    #
    workgroup = VIKINGURS
    server string = Samba Server Version %v

    ; max protocol = SMB2

    log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m
    max log size = 50
    netbios name = refur
    security = user
    passdb backend = tdbsam
    name resolve order = bcast host lmhosts wins
    lanman auth=yes
    ntlm auth=yes
    ; local master = yes
    ; preferred master = yes
    ; os level = 10

    load printers = yes
    cups options = raw

    ; printcap name = /etc/printcap
    # obtain a list of printers automatically on UNIX System V systems:
    ; printcap name = lpstat
    ; printing = cups


    #============================ Share Definitions ==============================

    [homes]
    comment = Home Directories
    browseable = yes
    writable = yes
    valid users = %S

    [printers]
    comment = All Printers
    path = /var/spool/samba
    browseable = no
    guest ok = no
    writable = no
    printable = yes

    [HDD0]
    comment HDD0
    path = /mnt/DV0
    guest ok = yes
    writeable = yes
    browseable = yes

    [HDD1]
    comment HDD1
    path = /mnt/DV1
    guest ok = yes
    writeable = yes
    browseable = yes

    [HDD2]
    comment HDD2
    path = /mnt/DV2
    guest ok = yes
    writeable = yes
    browseable = yes

    [HDD3]
    comment HDD3
    path = /mnt/DV3
    guest ok = yes
    writeable = yes
    browseable = yes

    [HDD4]
    comment HDD4
    path = /mnt/DV4
    guest ok = yes
    writeable = yes
    browseable = yes




    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 494
    Win 10 Pro x64 versions
       #28

    HarryD,

    You stated previously that currently your access to the Drobo's is password protected. Given that statement it suggests that you have an authenticated user account established on each Drobo. When you create folders then these folders should be under your authenticated user account control. Once you have that accomplished you can then assign the user to the shares created.

    So to address your multiple folders, when creating a share give the share a unique name like MyShare. Next map that share in Windows Explorer as a Network Location. Now having access to that share in Windows Explorer you can open that share in Explorer and create other folders within that share. You then only need to place your files in these folders you have created. The end result is a single location in Explorer that you can open that will have all of your data. The Drobo has the ability to copy data from one location to another on the device itself as well so any existing data can be moved from say a Public share to a User share.

    This is really quite simple actually. Have a look at the user guide for the Drobo 5N to learn how to create shares and users. Link below:

    Drobo Online User Guide
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 11,247
    Windows / Linux : Arch Linux
       #29

    Railtech said:
    HarryD,

    You stated previously that currently your access to the Drobo's is password protected. Given that statement it suggests that you have an authenticated user account established on each Drobo. When you create folders then these folders should be under your authenticated user account control. Once you have that accomplished you can then assign the user to the shares created.

    So to address your multiple folders, when creating a share give the share a unique name like MyShare. Next map that share in Windows Explorer as a Network Location. Now having access to that share in Windows Explorer you can open that share in Explorer and create other folders within that share. You then only need to place your files in these folders you have created. The end result is a single location in Explorer that you can open that will have all of your data. The Drobo has the ability to copy data from one location to another on the device itself as well so any existing data can be moved from say a Public share to a User share.

    This is really quite simple actually. Have a look at the user guide for the Drobo 5N to learn how to create shares and users. Link below:

    Drobo Online User Guide
    @Railtech

    I think as I've posted above that a cheap Linux server is infinitely better than any of these"Proprietary QNAP or other systems".

    And of course vastly more flexible -- apart from the fact it's also a lot cheaper solution too.

    Most Linux software is 100% free and doen't need a load of expensive hardware to run it on amd ntfs (Windows disks) can be attched for read / write simply by adding the package ntfs-3g - usually installed these days by default on modern distros.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 494
    Win 10 Pro x64 versions
       #30

    @jimbo45

    I agree with you on this point. Problem is that not everyone is comfortable with taking on a project like that so for them an off the self device is the perfect solution. For these folks they only need to learn to work with what they have. Either way, problem solved.
      My Computer


 

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