Home Optical Networking - Too late or still OK

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  1. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,474
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
       #1

    Home Optical Networking - Too late or still OK


    Hi folks

    I was thinking since I have a great Internet speed of >10Gb/s soon to be upgraded to 50 Gb/s I was thinking of replacing Lan cables by fibre optic to router to get max speed. Router will take optical cable so at that end it's OK.

    There's hardware around for the computer connector to use fibre optic -- my concern is that am I just wasting my time if the new decent wireless 5g systems will eliminate the need for any sort of cabling in the future. Of course until one knows what the pricing arrangements on 5g systems are it's difficult to make a choice -- 5g broadband needs to have unlimited deals otherwise 15 mins of a 4k UHD movie will eat your entire months allowance !!!! the current phone plans are bonkersly poor so far - however my broad band service is unlimited and with sometimes up to 4 people watching separate 4K UHD movies all at the same time I do need a fast service !!!

    This will give me up to 40Gb/s with full duplex to my multimedia server and the optical cable can go to approx 200 metres so should be fine.

    High Performance 40gbps Fiber Optic Nic Card Xl710-qda2 Ethernet Converged Network Adapter - Buy Xl710-qda2,2 Port Pci Lan Card,Network Adapter Product on Alibaba.com

    This stuff isn't the cheapest but the people watching the 4K UHD streamed movies have all agreed to put some money into the pot.

    Anybody else replaced their ethernet LAN with fibre and does it work "as it says on the tin". I can easily also upgrade the SSD's / HDD's to super mega fast SAS type if I have to as well but Disk I/O speed isn't or doesn't seem to be the bottleneck --it's definitely the load on the network when live streaming a load of very high definition video.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  2.    #2

    Hey @jimbo45: you've got the kind of problems all of us would like to have, but which very few of us can afford. The problem with going optical is that you need optical infrastructure (cables, switch points, taps for troubleshooting, and so forth). I don't think you can put together enough justification for a complete optical replacement for your twisted pair/wireless current situation. My advice: use the highest-rated TP cables you can. If you have to go 40 Gbps anywhere, it will probably makes sense only on the backbone.
    HTH,
    --Ed--
      My ComputersSystem Spec

  3. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,474
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
    Thread Starter
       #3

    EdTittel said: View Post
    Hey @jimbo45: you've got the kind of problems all of us would like to have, but which very few of us can afford. The problem with going optical is that you need optical infrastructure (cables, switch points, taps for troubleshooting, and so forth). I don't think you can put together enough justification for a complete optical replacement for your twisted pair/wireless current situation. My advice: use the highest-rated TP cables you can. If you have to go 40 Gbps anywhere, it will probably makes sense only on the backbone.
    HTH,
    --Ed--
    Hi there

    @EdTittel

    I've installed the card and get around 37 Gb/s on the internet now -- so I'll do the stress test tomorrow -- I've actually got a couple of 8K UHD movies to test -- although I don't have anything to play them on so the computer will have to downsize the video -- at least it's a good stress test.

    I also got the optical green light on the ISP modem to switch on so I know the optical cable is working properly. The ISP connection status also acknowleged the optical connection at 39Gb/s

    (We might be in a small cold country but I think we probably have one of the best Internet systems on the planet --so not all bad !!!)

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  4. bro67's Avatar
    Posts : 6,448
    Mac OS High Sierra 10.14.3 Beta (18D21c)
       #4

    You would need a Switch that has a 10gb port and then have to install 10gb NIC’s on all computers. Laptops would not be able to use a 10gb connection because their ethernet is hardwired on the motherboard. You do not need to run Fiber Optic unless you are going between buildings and do not want the risk of a lightening strike or have a lot of RFI noise around your networking gear or where you are using the devices. CAT-6 will handle 10gb just fine. No need for anything at this time over 1gb, unless you are working from home with large video files for broadcast or CAD.
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  5. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,474
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Hi there
    I don't think you read the spec - the card in the computer is infact the NIC !!!!! and it works

    Of course on other computers they will need their own nic's to be changed -that's obvious -- however my point was to get the server capable of fast internet real time multimedia streams which other client computers could then handle adequately-- if you have got several people wanting to watch different 4K UHD video streams on a slow server --forget it !!!!! If the server can grab a 4KUHD movie in a few minutes -- job done !!! For a single server with one optical cable between it and the ISP cable optical box you don't need a switch ---- now if I start changing stuff on other computers mobos - then that's a different issue.

    Optical technology for the home is reasonably affordable -- especially if you have number of people to share the cost -- I agree though for single users at home a 1Gb/s classical LAN system is more than sufficient for most purposes.

    I also intend to give some video courses and have e-commerce as well so fast Internet is essential fot me.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  6.    #6

    At 39 Gbps, you're redefining what "fast Internet" in the home means. Keep on trail-blazing, my friend, and do share more details -- and photos -- with us, as you get it built out. Great stuff!
    --Ed--
      My ComputersSystem Spec


  7. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,474
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
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       #7

    EdTittel said: View Post
    At 39 Gbps, you're redefining what "fast Internet" in the home means. Keep on trail-blazing, my friend, and do share more details -- and photos -- with us, as you get it built out. Great stuff!
    --Ed--
    @EdTittel

    Will do when it's all working -- If I leave any bit of cable around the place though my life isn't worth living -- she's had enough of bits of computer hardware and other gear left all over the place.

    I used to drive my parents mad years ago when I repaired motorbikes with a few colleagues on Sunday afternoons -- and leaving brand new cleaned carpets dripping with Engine oil didn't make them very happy !!! but we loved it --still remember those days with great affection.

    I was by trade an Engineer and still love old fashioned engineering where you get you hands dirty and breath in fumes of old fashioned soldering iron tinning core flux !!! -- and this stuff makes perfect sense if you need to share movies etc in the home etc.

    Nobody ever suffered by having fast Internet speeds - the amount of things I can do now would not have been possible years ago and don't believe the imbeciles who say older people "Can't do technology or will get to easily scammed on the Internet".

    It's the youngsters these days who only sit in offices and hose up the worlds financial markets who don't understand how "The Planet works". !!

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  8. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,474
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
    Thread Starter
       #8

    Hi folks

    managed to get 4 concurrent UHD 8K streams all sent and played on client computers with barely a ripple in the delivery speed -- the 8K streams all had to be "downrezzed" on the client machines as they didn't have the video graphics to play the content -- however the downrezzing was done on the actual client machines so the server wasn't involved in that.

    The client machines connected via a Netgear blackhawk wifi extender which was capable of delivering via a cheap switch 1.2 Gb/s so the clients had plenty of resolution -- meanwhile the server with the optical LAN card was getting the full wack of around 37Gb/s to the ISP and router and could dish up the stream perfectly.

    If you are using things like NAS for streaming video it's worth looking at the fibre LAN option if you have an ISP with decent fast fibre internet - OK if you don't have several "Greedy" clients then OK a bit overkill but I've found that fast Internet never hurt anybody.

    Incidentally while 5g broadband has the possibility to be faster the current plans with measly data allowances make the thing so far a non starter - especially when current ISP provider gives unlimited bandwidth.

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec

  9.    #9

    What will you do with 50 Gbps internet?

    I have 100 Mbps (up and down), which allows around 600 MB per minute downloads.
    I could pay $20/month more for 1000 Mbps, which would give me 6 GB per minute.

    The largest download I've ever done was a 60 GB piano software package.
    I had "only" 20 Mbps service back then, so it was a time-consuming download.
    But today at 100 Mbps it would take 100 minutes.
    With the faster 1000 Mbps service it would take 10 minutes.
    With your 50 Gbps service you could do it in 2 minutes ... assuming the blaster at the other end of the pipe can feed at that rate.

    That's a noticeable reduction.
    But do you often pull content that big?

    Mostly I pull tens or hundreds of MB, or sometimes a few GB. But seldom tens of GB.
    So there's no incentive for me to go with 1000 Mbps service, never mind 50 Gbps.

    Count me as puzzled.
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  10. jimbo45's Avatar
    Posts : 7,474
    Windows / Linux : Centos, Ubuntu, OpenSuse
    Thread Starter
       #10

    Hi there @margrave55

    It's not that a single user would usually need or require but once you start talking about concurrent users consuming things like continuous on demand 4K UHD movie streams , shared gaming experiences e.g Steam etc , social media chats on video, plus several users in e-commerce and interrogating MySQL databases etc and a load of users for lots of file sharing and client data backup on a NAS the whole ballgame becomes quite different.

    I'll bet even in a "Normal" type household using say the 2.4GHZ wifi band you'll get noticeable slow down once you have say even 10 devices connected and being used e.g phones, tablets, computers, smart TV's and wifi / internet enabled smart speakers, amazon fire tv sticks etc.

    Imagine trying to fill say 12 one gallon cans with water -- obviously if you can use say something like multiple outlets from a swimming pool you can do it far quicker as the cans can all be filled at once but if you only have say a basic outside garden tap it will take a lot longer !!!!!!.

    Hopefully that answers the query as to why this type of stuff is beneficial -- just visit people who have a load of computer literate kids all bashing away on the Internet with every device you can possibly think of - gaming like crazy and testing social media to destruction while watching the latest blockbusters probably filched from TPB etc and some devices you've probably never heard of--- I think you'll see the point very quickly !!

    Cheers
    jimbo
      My ComputerSystem Spec


 
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